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Political Science Commons

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2006

Other Political Science

Michael S. Givel

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Neoliberal And Public Health Impact Of Not Adopting Osha’S Proposed National Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Rule, Michael Givel Jan 2006

Neoliberal And Public Health Impact Of Not Adopting Osha’S Proposed National Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Rule, Michael Givel

Michael S. Givel

From the early 1980s to the present, neo-liberal doctrine has called for governmental policies of privatization, funding cutbacks, and deregulation of public health and other domestic social programs in the belief that the market can best organize and distribute crucial societal services rather than the public sector. Proponents of a neoliberal and deregulatory mixed approach of command and control and self-regulation argue this approach provides the most adequate means to conduct regulation in the legalistic and adversarial United States regulatory process. In April 1994, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a proposed rule to eliminate tobacco smoking in most ...


Punctuated Equilibrium In Limbo: The Tobacco Lobby And U.S. State Policy Making From 1990 To 2003, Michael S. Givel Dec 2005

Punctuated Equilibrium In Limbo: The Tobacco Lobby And U.S. State Policy Making From 1990 To 2003, Michael S. Givel

Michael S. Givel

Since the mid-1980s, U.S. tobacco policy has been an intense and acrimonious issue between antitobacco advocates and the tobacco industry. In the United States, the tobacco industry has responded to heightened state antitobacco litigation, adverse public opinion, and public health advocacy by aggressively mobilizing against tobacco taxes and regulations. This article examines whether these tobacco policy trends can be generalized to punctuated equilibrium theory ideas that policy monopolies are stable over long periods and usually change because of sharp and short-term exogenous shocks to the policy system. From 1990 to 2003, there was a sharp mobilization by health advocates ...