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Political Science Commons

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2001

World War II

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Bushido, Robert J. Bunker Jan 2001

Bushido, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Bushido was originally a code of conduct for the samurai, the warrior class of feudal Japan. The term literally means "the way [do] of the warrior [bushi]." Basic principles of Bushido developed during and in the centuries of warfare before the Kamakura Shogunate (1192-1333). The term came into normal usage during the stable Tokugawa Shogunate (1603-1867), when the samurai were subordinated tot he will of the state and the literary classic Hagakure (1716) was written.


Small Arms, Japanese, Robert J. Bunker Jan 2001

Small Arms, Japanese, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Japanese army and naval-infantry forces relied on a standard assortment of small arms in World War II. These arms can be grouped into rifles and carbines, pistols, light machine guns, and submachine guns. Heavy machine guns, while not normally considered small arms, will also be covered under this topical heading, Japanese small arms ammunition could be identified, in many instances, by the following colored bands: pink (ball), black (armor-piercing), and green (tracer).


Grenades And Land Mines, Japanese, Robert J. Bunker Jan 2001

Grenades And Land Mines, Japanese, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Two forms of infantry weapons–grenades and land mines–complemented the small arms used by Japanese army and naval landing forces in World War II. These forces employed numerous types of hand grenades, which generally ranged in weight to 10 to 20 ounces.


Psychological Warfare, Japanese, Robert J. Bunker Jan 2001

Psychological Warfare, Japanese, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Japanese psychological warfare operations were modeled on campaigns conducted by the British in World War I and the Germans in World War II. The Germans established a branch of their propaganda ministry in Japan, which resulted in close psychological warfare collaboration between these two Axis powers. As a result, their propaganda themes, such as both nations having divine or semidivine rulers and being populated by super races whose destiny was to rule the world, were strikingly parallel.