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Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1998

College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Race And Baseball In North Dakota In The 1930'S, Reynaldo A. Aligada Jan 1998

Race And Baseball In North Dakota In The 1930'S, Reynaldo A. Aligada

Honors Theses, 1963-2015

In the 1930s in North Dakota, town teams employed black players from the Negro Leagues. In the communities of Bismarck and Jamestown, North Dakota, players were denied membership while performing a socially important function--playing baseball. Because of their race, they were ineligible for membership.


1996 Welfare Reform: Effects On Single-Parent Families In Rural Minnesota, Philip M. Kern Jan 1998

1996 Welfare Reform: Effects On Single-Parent Families In Rural Minnesota, Philip M. Kern

Honors Theses, 1963-2015

In 1996, historic legislation redirected and changed our national system of welfare, a structure that had been in place for over 60 years. Despite minor tinkering in various years since the 1960s, the distribution of welfare in this country for the most part has fallen under the same guidelines since its creation. However, the recent changes, at both the national and state levels, will have a profound impact on the lives of the most disadvantaged Americans. In this thesis, I will explain the 1996 national and state welfare reform laws and how they fail to provide the necessary solutions for ...


The Gender Gap In The 1996 Presidential Election:An Examination Of Gender Gaps In Public Opinion And Political Communication, Nicole Kroetsch Jan 1998

The Gender Gap In The 1996 Presidential Election:An Examination Of Gender Gaps In Public Opinion And Political Communication, Nicole Kroetsch

Honors Theses, 1963-2015

The gender gap in the electorate was highlighted as a distinguishing feature of the presidential election in 1996. Because it was recognized as such an important political phenomenon, citizens, politicians, political strategists and journalists offered explanations for its existence. Two common explanations surfaced: women and men voted differently because they cared about different public issues and women and men voted differently because they responded differently to the communication styles of the candidates. When examining these claims within the specific context of the presidential campaign of 1996, their validity is challenged by solid research. Although there were some political issues, such ...