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1975

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Testimony Of Ambassador Clayton K. Yeutter U.S. Deputy Special Representative For Trade Negotiations The American Role In East-West Trade Before The U.S. Senate Committee On Commerce, Clayton K. Yeutter Dec 1975

Testimony Of Ambassador Clayton K. Yeutter U.S. Deputy Special Representative For Trade Negotiations The American Role In East-West Trade Before The U.S. Senate Committee On Commerce, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee:

Thank you for extending to me this opportunity to participate in these hearings on the current status of East-West trade. This review of the U.S. role in East-West trade is both important and timely. Ambassador Dent had looked forward to being with you, and regrets that he is out of the country and unable to testify today.


Facing The Economic Issue, Clayton K. Yeutter Aug 1975

Facing The Economic Issue, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

Perhaps the most significant item on America's unfinished agenda is the status of our economy. We are all aware of serious difficulties in our economic structure today. We could scarcely fail to notice, what with recent devaluations of the dollar, double-digit inflation, serious unemployment, recession and staggering Federal budget deficits.

Obviously, we have not yet achieved the ideal economic system. Even worse, we seem to have major disagreement about where we are and the direction in which we want to travel.


Address By The Honorable Clayton K. Yeutter Assistant Secretary Of Agriculture For International Affairs & Commodity Programs U.S. Department Of Agriculture To The 51st Annual Convention Of The American Cotton Shippers Association, Clayton K. Yeutter May 1975

Address By The Honorable Clayton K. Yeutter Assistant Secretary Of Agriculture For International Affairs & Commodity Programs U.S. Department Of Agriculture To The 51st Annual Convention Of The American Cotton Shippers Association, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

Thank you very much, Heinz.

You know, this program has gone so well this morning, that it is with some trepidation that l even stand up.

My compliments to everybody here at the table who has been before this podium today.

Hans, I think this is the best organized, best presented program on which I have appeared in many, many months and, I have appeared on a lot of them.

I "take my hat off" to all of you.

Beyond that, I want to say to all of you, before I get into the substance of my remarks, that although ...


"Producing A World Crop In A World Market", Clayton K. Yeutter Apr 1975

"Producing A World Crop In A World Market", Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

From the very beginning, rice in the United States has been an export crop. History shows that the development of the U.S. rice industry started in about 1964, and by 1698 sufficient rice was being produced to warrant an effort to export it.

That same year a petition was drawn up in South Caroline where the rice was being produced to get the English to drop their import tariffs on colony-produced rice. Two years later about 300 tons were shipped to England.


Youth And The Rural Resurgence, Clayton K. Yeutter Mar 1975

Youth And The Rural Resurgence, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

Many of us have been concerned about the apparent decline of rural America for some time. We have watched the outmigration of people from farms and rural towns. We have worried about the substandard housing and the relative scarcity of health care. We have charted declining economic bases I and shrinking rural job markets.

Thus, it is a.particular pleasure today to see rural America staging a comeback. A radical turnaround is under way in rural and small town areas. It is changing the destiny of these areas, making them more attractive places for young people like yourselves to locate ...


The Dangerous Time, Clayton K. Yeutter Mar 1975

The Dangerous Time, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

This is the most dangerous legislative period for American farming in at least ten years. Not since 1965, when low farm incomes and massive crop surpluses forced the beginning of a radical shift in our farm policy approach, has there existed as much potential for backward steps in our farm program.

The nation made the right choice ten years ago. Our farm programs have gradually become more market-oriented and more export-oriented since that time. Acreage allotments and bases have been relaxed. Farmers have been given more management freedom, which they have used to increase their productive efficiency. Massive surpluses have ...


The Psychology Of Recovery, Clayton K. Yeutter Mar 1975

The Psychology Of Recovery, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

Franklin Roosevelt said during the Great Depression, 11 The only thing we have to fear is fear itself." That may have seemed ironic to the man standing in line outside a soup kitchen at the time. But the statement was true; in the 1930's, we let fear drive us into some policies that worsened the Great Depression and made it longer and more far-reaching than might otherwise have been the case.

By the same token, our attitude toward the present recession can play an important role in getting us out of it. And nothing will do more for American ...


The Changing Congressional Climate, Clayton K. Yeutter Feb 1975

The Changing Congressional Climate, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

The current legislative climate for American agriculture is illustrated by the House Agriculture Committee in the new Congress. The committee in the last session had 37 members and was chaired by Rep. Poage of Texas. The House Agriculture Committee today has 43 members, and is chaired by Rep. Foley of the State of Washington.

The committee was enlarged this session to make room for all of the new Congressmen who wanted to serve on it. Only a few years ago, new Congressmen had to be dragooned onto the Agriculture Committee.


Quick Economic Action Needed To Help Agriculture, Yeutter Says:, Clayton K. Yeutter Feb 1975

Quick Economic Action Needed To Help Agriculture, Yeutter Says:, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

"American agriculture needs a healthy non-farm economy to prosper fully. Right now, that means taking some strong economic medicine, which President Ford has prescribed," said Clayton K. Yeutter, Assistant Secretary of Agriculture and Nebraska farmer-rancher in Omaha today. Speaking to the Omaha Chamber of Commerce Agribusiness Club, Mr. Yeutter said that the economies of the United States and most of the world have been thrown out of kilter by the combination of the oil crisis and business cycle downturns.


Looking Forward, Clayton K. Yeutter Feb 1975

Looking Forward, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

A couple of weeks ago, on my Far Eastern tour, I visited a farm in Taiwan. The contrast with Montana could not have been more striking.

This was a good-sized farm by Taiwanese standards, about 10 acres. It is farmed by a father and his six sons, and provides most of the support for the 40 people in their families. The agriculture is highly intensive. They alternate rice and vegetables on their land, getting at least two crops of each per year. They were also raising hogs--completely confined from birth to slaughter because land is so precious. There were no ...


Soybeans -- What To Look For In 1975, Clayton K. Yeutter Jan 1975

Soybeans -- What To Look For In 1975, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

I have just returned from a tour of our major farm product customers in the Far East -- Japan, Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines. The most impressive thing I found there was the forward-looking spirit of these nations, and their driving determination to continue their economic growth in spite of the world's current energy and inflation problems.

All of these nations are vitally interested in American farm products, with soybeans high on their priority lists. All of them are looking past the current recession atmosphere, and planning for the future. All of them have more protein for their diets as ...


Food Trade And Aid, Clayton K. Yeutter Jan 1975

Food Trade And Aid, Clayton K. Yeutter

Clayton K. Yeutter, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Papers

The key question on food policy in the world today is how we can get maximum effective output from the world's agriculture in the years ahead. ·World food production will likely need to double in the next 25 years if we are going to meet the needs of the world's rapidly growing population and to provide the higher standard of eating that so many of the world's peoples desire.

We cannot attain that level of efficient food production without a far more efficient and effective world agriculture than we have today.