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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Laughing In The Face Of Oppression: The Nature Of Political Satire Under Different Types Of Political Regimes, Victoria Villavicencio Pérez Jan 2017

Laughing In The Face Of Oppression: The Nature Of Political Satire Under Different Types Of Political Regimes, Victoria Villavicencio Pérez

Honors Program Theses

This research examines how different types of political regimes shape the nature of the political satire produced under them. Unlike traditional journalism, the sly character of political humor may enable it to operate with more freedom than other forms of media while still providing social critique. This research examines three different case studies: the United States (democracy), Venezuela (semi-authoritarian), and Cuba (authoritarian) and evaluates their satire on how openly critical it is and what type of censorship it suffers. Through extensive content analysis of satirical work produced within the country, as well as a historical research into the censorship of ...


Old News: A Historical Analysis Of Criticism Of Venezuela's Press Freedom, Emilee Lamb May 2016

Old News: A Historical Analysis Of Criticism Of Venezuela's Press Freedom, Emilee Lamb

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


Performing Private Life On The Public Stage: Tracing Narratives Of Presidential Family Lives, Leisure And Masculinities In Us News Media, Kathryn Michele Kallenberger May 2015

Performing Private Life On The Public Stage: Tracing Narratives Of Presidential Family Lives, Leisure And Masculinities In Us News Media, Kathryn Michele Kallenberger

Theses and Dissertations

Images and stories about US presidents’ family lives, private vacations and athletic identities are constants in the political news media landscape. These news representations texture and shape how the presidents are envisioned in popular imagination as powerful political figures and embodiments of contemporary masculinities. This study explicates US news media representations of President Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama in select mainstream political news publications from the 1990s to the 2000s. This study further considers how the cultural forces of heteronormativity, patriarchy, Baby Boomer masculinity, class, race and taste influenced popular presidential images. Much of the news discourse regarding presidents ...


American Propaganda, Popular Media, And The Fall Of Jacobo Arbenz, Zachary Carl Fisher May 2012

American Propaganda, Popular Media, And The Fall Of Jacobo Arbenz, Zachary Carl Fisher

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

In June 1954, President Jacobo Arbenz Guzman of Guatemala resigned in the face of a coup led by Colonel Carlos Castillo Armas. While the United States publicly denied involvement, the coup was in fact the culmination of a plan called PBSUCCESS (CIA codeword), led by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Although PBSUCCESS lived up to its namesake, it was aided (both intentionally and unintentionally) by various U.S. media outlets. For the duration of Arbenz Guzman's regime, he and his country had been the subject of U.S. suspicions of undue Communist and Soviet influence. A general anti-Communist attitude ...


Behind The Scenes Of The American Dream: Identity Struggles Of Arab And Muslim Minorities In The U.S., Lama Abbasi Jan 2012

Behind The Scenes Of The American Dream: Identity Struggles Of Arab And Muslim Minorities In The U.S., Lama Abbasi

Global Honors Theses

While diversity and inclusion are commonly regarded as American ideals, minorities often feel out of place in "mainstream" American society, marginalized by misconceptions of culture, religion, and politics. In this thesis, the author analyzes the struggles of Arab Americans, focusing on issues such as racial classification, the contradictions of the Arab and American identities, and the influence of U.S. foreign policy and the media on public perceptions of Arabs and Muslims. The paper concludes with suggestions on how educational and societal curricula can correct misconceptions about Arab Americans and other minority groups.