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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

Government officials who run administrative agencies must make countless decisions every day about what issues and work to prioritize. These agenda-setting decisions hold enormous implications for the shape of law and public policy, but they have received remarkably little attention by either administrative law scholars or social scientists who study the bureaucracy. Existing research offers few insights about the institutions, norms, and inputs that shape and constrain agency discretion over their agendas or about the strategies that officials employ in choosing to elevate certain issues while putting others on the back burner. In this article, we advance the study of ...


Presidential Rhetoric And The Federal Reserve, C. Damien Arthur Jan 2018

Presidential Rhetoric And The Federal Reserve, C. Damien Arthur

C. Damien Arthur

Presidents persistently use their rhetoric as a mechanism of influence over salient policies. As the economy has become more salient, presidents have tried to gain a semblance of control over its direction and robustness. Yet, there exists no substantial research regarding whether the rhetoric is influential with the most important economic actors such as the Federal Reserve. Assessing whether presidential cues and signals shape the Fed’s economic behavior provides an assessment of rhetoric’s effect. Utilizing the economic speeches from D.D. Eisenhower through B.H. Obama this paper questions whether the Fed’s behavior modeled what the presidents ...


Obstruction Scores - Chamber-Congress - 1789-1901.Xlsx, Gregory Koger Dec 2017

Obstruction Scores - Chamber-Congress - 1789-1901.Xlsx, Gregory Koger

Gregory Koger

Provides data on dilatory motions and disappearing quorums from 1789 to 1901 for both the U.S. House and Senate. The data are aggregated by Congress, i.e. two-year periods beginning and ending in March of odd-numbered years.


A Quantum Congress, Jorge R. Roig Dec 2014

A Quantum Congress, Jorge R. Roig

Jorge R Roig

This article tries to address the problem of a corrupt and broken electoral system that has been captured by special interests through big money spending in political campaigns, while at the same time preserving the spirit of the Free Speech Clause of our Constitution. In doing so, this article first reviews and summarizes the different alternatives proposed as potential fixes for the campaign finance problem. It then explains why none of the proposed alternatives can accomplish the dual goals set out above. Finally, the article briefly sketches a proposal for a fundamental reworking of our representative democracy by substituting legislative ...


Strategic Diversity In Union Political Action: Implications For The 1992 House Elections, Richard W. Hurd, Jeffrey E. Sohl Oct 2013

Strategic Diversity In Union Political Action: Implications For The 1992 House Elections, Richard W. Hurd, Jeffrey E. Sohl

Richard W Hurd

[Excerpt] The purpose of this paper is to explore labor's strategic options in the 1992 elections. We will focus on House races because the diversity in political strategies among unions is most apparent there. However, our conclusions will have broader implications for union activity in elections at all levels of government. In evaluating the situation we will consider the impact of redistricting on labor's alternatives. We should note that recent developments have made many union political operatives more optimistic. The upset victory by populist Democrat Harris Wofford in the special Senate election in Pennsylvania, the eventual compromises on ...


Don’T Be Silly: Lawmakers “Rarely” Read Legislation And Oftentimes Don’T Understand It . . . But That’S Okay, Brian Christopher Jones Sep 2013

Don’T Be Silly: Lawmakers “Rarely” Read Legislation And Oftentimes Don’T Understand It . . . But That’S Okay, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

During the debate over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare"), the reading and understanding of legislation became one of the most controversial issues mentioned in Congress and throughout the media. This led many to state that lawmakers should “read the bill,” and led one academic to propose a read-the-bill rule for Congress, where legislators would not vote or vote “no” if they had not read the full text of the legislation. My essay argues that in contemporary legislatures such proposals are unfeasible, and would ultimately produce lower quality legislation. In doing so, the piece uses interviews with legislative ...


Parlamento Re-Activo. De Cómo Partidos Poderosos Habitan En Una Legislatura Con Potestades Recortadas, Daniel Chasquetti Apr 2012

Parlamento Re-Activo. De Cómo Partidos Poderosos Habitan En Una Legislatura Con Potestades Recortadas, Daniel Chasquetti

Daniel Chasquetti

This article examines the institutional features of the Uruguayan Parliament and its particular relationship with a powerful Executive and an institutionalized party system. The thesis argues that the current Parliament’s prerogatives arise in the preferences of political parties, which at different junctures reformers chose to design a government system with a powerful Executive branch. This implied the definition of a reactive legislature and a functional habitat for the development of a stable political party cast. In order to demonstrate these statements, the author tooks several empirical tests to assess the consequences of this institutional design, the power exerted by ...


A Gender Gap In Policy Representation In The U.S. Congress?, Brian Newman, Christina Wolbrecht, John Griffin Dec 2011

A Gender Gap In Policy Representation In The U.S. Congress?, Brian Newman, Christina Wolbrecht, John Griffin

Brian Newman

In the first article to evaluate the equality of dyadic policy representation experienced by women, we assess the congruence between U.S. House members' roll-call votes and the policy preferences of their female and male constituents. Employing two measures of policy representation, we do not find a gender gap in dyadic policy representation. However, we uncover a sizeable gender gap favoring men in districts represented by Republicans, and a similarly sizeable gap favoring women in districts represented by Democrats. A Democratic majority further improves women's dyadic representation relative to men, but having a female representative (descriptive representation) does not.


The Rise Of The 60-Vote Senate, Gregory Koger Dec 2011

The Rise Of The 60-Vote Senate, Gregory Koger

Gregory Koger

How did the Senate transform into a supermajority legislature? To answer this question, we must have a clear understanding of what filibustering was like before 1960, and why senators abandoned this system. I begin with some definitions and a quick historical survey, and then explain the emergence of the sixty-vote Senate.


Drafting Proper Short Bill Titles: Do States Have The Answer?, Brian Christopher Jones Dec 2011

Drafting Proper Short Bill Titles: Do States Have The Answer?, Brian Christopher Jones

Brian Christopher Jones

No abstract provided.


El Secreto Del Éxito: Presidentes Y Cártles Legislativos En Uruguay, Daniel Chasquetti Dec 2011

El Secreto Del Éxito: Presidentes Y Cártles Legislativos En Uruguay, Daniel Chasquetti

Daniel Chasquetti

In the last two decades the Uruguayan political system has shown a cooperative relationship between the two government branches. he Executives were able to pass their legislative agenda in an eicient way by building cartel-party at the Houses. his article proposes an explanation based on the theoretical developments of Cox and McCubbins (1993 and 2005), about the creation of legislative cartels in Uruguay. In particular, the article explains how constitutes a central authority in the House where the executive holds a dominant inluence, and how that authority usurps and controls the agenda power. I also present new evidence about the ...


What Is A Reasonable Compromise On Health Care Reform?, Peter Dreier Jun 2011

What Is A Reasonable Compromise On Health Care Reform?, Peter Dreier

Peter Dreier

No abstract provided.


Divided Government And Foreign Relations Approval, Brian Newman, Kevin Lammert May 2011

Divided Government And Foreign Relations Approval, Brian Newman, Kevin Lammert

Brian Newman

During divided government, the public tends to attribute credit and blame for economic conditions to both the president and Congress. However, the "two presidencies" thesis argues that presidents have more influence vis-a-vis Congress in shaping foreign policy compared to domestic policy, so the public may attribute all foreign policy outcomes to the president alone. This suggests that the boost presidents typically receive in their overall approval during divided government due to sharing the blame for negative economic conditions will not extend to their foreign relations approval numbers, We find that presidents do enjoy higher overall approval during divided government. However ...


The Past And Future Of The Supermajority Senate, Gregory Koger Dec 2010

The Past And Future Of The Supermajority Senate, Gregory Koger

Gregory Koger

The distinguishing feature of the modern U.S. Senate is the ability of any senator to block legislation and nominations, forcing the rest of the chamber to limit debate using a slow process that requires a 60-vote supermajority. This article explains the development of this new and powerful veto in the legislative process, its use as a minority party veto, and then reviews options for restoring the balance between governance and deliberation.


Determinants Of Protectionist Attitudes In The U.S. House Of Representatives, James Lutz Sep 2010

Determinants Of Protectionist Attitudes In The U.S. House Of Representatives, James Lutz

James M Lutz

No abstract provided.


War Powers In The Obama Administration, Ryan C. Hendrickson Jul 2010

War Powers In The Obama Administration, Ryan C. Hendrickson

Ryan C. Hendrickson

With the arrival of a new American president in 2009, the power and constitutional authority of the commander in chief to engage in military action remains as relevant as ever. Barack Obama inherited a war in Iraq, has worked with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to initiate a 17,000 American combat troop surge in Afghanistan in March 2009 and another increase of 30,000 personnel later that year, more than doubling the total American presence. He also permitted American Navy Seals to use force against Somali pirates in the first months of his presidency. In addition, nuclear development and ...


Identifying Central Actors: A Network Analysis Of The 2009-2010 Health Reform Debate, Jennifer Hayes Clark, Stacey Pelika, Elizabeth Rigby Jan 2010

Identifying Central Actors: A Network Analysis Of The 2009-2010 Health Reform Debate, Jennifer Hayes Clark, Stacey Pelika, Elizabeth Rigby

Jennifer Hayes Clark

The fragmented design of American institutions intentionally diffuses authority among political actors. As a result, tracing the (often changing) distribution of power is essential to better understanding the policymaking process. In this paper, we capitalize on the current health care debate’s multidimensionality and its high salience, as reflected in the extensive media coverage it has attracted. Through network analysis of daily news articles from five news sources that vary in approach and audience, we assess the centrality of each Member of Congress to the health care debate in general, as well as at each stage of this recent policy ...


Making Change: A Six-Month Review, Gregory Koger Dec 2008

Making Change: A Six-Month Review, Gregory Koger

Gregory Koger

This article surveys President Obama's policy agenda-setting for the first six months of his term. I consider whether the conditions ripe for an ambitious policy agenda and summarize the logic of Presidential agenda-setting. I use this framework to explain the Democrats' agenda for 2009, summarize their progress thus far, and discuss the implications for the Democratic Party in 2010 and after. Although the Democrats have made significant progress on their policy goals, they have not reaped the full political rewards from this success. Instead, the majority party will likely be judged on the pace of economic recovery and whether ...


The Unequal Representation Of Latinos And Whites, Brian Newman, John D. Griffin Oct 2007

The Unequal Representation Of Latinos And Whites, Brian Newman, John D. Griffin

Brian Newman

We compare the ideological proximity of Latinos and whites to their Members of Congress (MCs), demonstrating the degree to which Latinos are underrepresented compared to whites. We show how this representation gap varies with group differences in electoral turnout and income, district ethnic composition, and MCs' ethnicity and party affiliation. We find that Latinos' unequal representation is not simply a function of the group's numerical minority status. Concentrating Latinos in congressional districts does not necessarily translate into more equal representation. However, several factors can enhance the equality of Latinos' representation-participation in elections and representation by both Latinos and Democrats.


Strategic Party Government: Party Influence In Congress, 1789-2000.”, Matthew J. Lebo, Adam J. Mcglynn, Gregory Koger Dec 2006

Strategic Party Government: Party Influence In Congress, 1789-2000.”, Matthew J. Lebo, Adam J. Mcglynn, Gregory Koger

Gregory Koger

Why does the influence of Congressional parties fluctuate over time Building on prevailing answers, we develop a model, Strategic Party Government, which highlights the electoral motives of legislative parties and the strategic interaction between parties. We test this theory using the entire range of House and Senate party behavior from 1789 to 2000 and find that the strategic behavior of parties complements members' preferences as an explanation for variation in party influence. Specifically, the strongest predictors of one party's voting unity are the unity of the opposing party and the difference between the parties in the preceding year. Moreover ...


Cloture Reform And Party Government In The Senate, 1918 To 1925, Gregory Koger Dec 2005

Cloture Reform And Party Government In The Senate, 1918 To 1925, Gregory Koger

Gregory Koger

Why does filibustering persist in the U.S. Senate? This article analyzes senators' preferences toward majority cloture from 1918 to 1925, a crucial period in Senate history. I find that majority party members were more likely to support stricter cloture rules, but support for cloture reform diminished within both parties for senators far from the party median. I find little evidence that support or opposition to cloture reform was linked to seniority, prior House experience, legislative activism, or state size. These findings are consistent with the micro-level claims of conditional party government theory.


Agenda Setting, Issue Priorities, And Organizational Maintenance: The U.S. Supreme Court, 1955 To 1994, Jeff L. Yates, Andrew B. Whitford, William Gillespie Jan 2005

Agenda Setting, Issue Priorities, And Organizational Maintenance: The U.S. Supreme Court, 1955 To 1994, Jeff L. Yates, Andrew B. Whitford, William Gillespie

Jeff L Yates

In this study, we examine agenda setting by the U.S. Supreme Court, and ask the question of why the Court allocates more or less of its valuable agenda space to one policy issue over others. Our study environment is the policy issue composition of the Court's docket: the Court's attention to criminal justice policy issues relative to other issues. We model the Court's allocation of this agenda space as a function of internal organizational demands and external political signals. We find that this agenda responds to the issue priorities of the other branches of the federal ...


John Kerry As Commander-In-Chief: War Powers In A Kerry Administration, Ryan C. Hendrickson Dec 2003

John Kerry As Commander-In-Chief: War Powers In A Kerry Administration, Ryan C. Hendrickson

Ryan C. Hendrickson

Unlike many previous presidential elections, in 2004 foreign policy issues are at the forefront of the American policy and electoral agenda. Not since the Vietnam era has the United States entered an election year with the United States at such a heightened state of war, with ongoing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as covert operations deployed around the world to wage the war on terrorism. After nearly one full term with George W. Bush as commander in chief, his views on constitutional war powers have been expressed on numerous occasions. Bush, like his post World War II ...


Position-Taking And Cosponsorship In The U.S. House, Gregory Koger Dec 2002

Position-Taking And Cosponsorship In The U.S. House, Gregory Koger

Gregory Koger

Bill cosponsorship has become an important part of the legislative and electoral process in the modern House of Representatives. Using interviews with congressional members and staff, I explain the role of cosponsorship as a signal to agenda setters and a form of position taking for constituents. Regression analysis confirms that cosponsoring varies with a member's electoral circumstances, institutional position, and state size, but generally members have adapted slowly to the introduction of cosponsorship to the rules and practice of the House.


Explaining Seat Changes In The U.S. House Of Representatives, 1950-1998, Brian Newman, Charles Ostrom Dec 2001

Explaining Seat Changes In The U.S. House Of Representatives, 1950-1998, Brian Newman, Charles Ostrom

Brian Newman

Recent U.S. House elections have challenged existing models of congressional elections, raising the question of whether or not processes thought to govern previous elections are still at work. Taking Marra and Ostrom's (1989) model of congressional elections as representative of extant theoretical perspectives and testing it against recent elections, we find that the model fails. We augment Marra and Ostrom's model with new insights, constructing a model that explains elections from 1950 to 1998. We find that, although presidential approval ratings and major political events continue to drive congressional elections, the distribution of open seats must also ...


"The Rebirth Of Party: The 1994 Congressional Elections In Historical Perspective", Richard M. Skinner Dec 1996

"The Rebirth Of Party: The 1994 Congressional Elections In Historical Perspective", Richard M. Skinner

Richard M. Skinner

The Republican surge of 1994 poses serious problems for most theories of congressional elections, which either discount the likelihood of such a swing, or attribute one to a readily apparent short-term cause. This essay includes a district-level analysis that finds a strong link between the 1988-92 presidential vote and the 1994 House vote. A discussion of theories of realignment leads to a conclusion that while the U.S. political system is changing, a new Republican era may not yet be upon us.


Bringing Politics Back In: Defense Policy And The Theoretical Study Of Institutions And Processes, Kenneth R. Mayer, Khademian M. Anne Mar 1996

Bringing Politics Back In: Defense Policy And The Theoretical Study Of Institutions And Processes, Kenneth R. Mayer, Khademian M. Anne

Kenneth R Mayer

Application of public administration theory to defense policy and procruemt. Students of public administration, regulatory processes, public bureaucracy, and policy studies rarely focus on defense as their substantive area. leaving the field to those trained in defense studies and international relations. THe result is negligible attention to the domestic political aspects of defense policy and minimal understanding of the administrative aspects of defense policy. We argue that a realistic examination of procurement in a political context of multiple and competing principals illustrates the difficulty of demanding accountability when goals are diverse and heavily debated, measured with difficulty, and where outcomes ...


Closing Military Bases (Finally)): Solving Collective Dilemmas Through Delegation, Kenneth R. Mayer Aug 1995

Closing Military Bases (Finally)): Solving Collective Dilemmas Through Delegation, Kenneth R. Mayer

Kenneth R Mayer

No abstract provided.