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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn Nov 2010

Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn

Kenneth D. Colburn

As the People's Republic of China shifts toward a more market-oriented economic system, it has also begun exploring another Western institution: scientific public opinion polling. As Yang Guansan, one of China's leading pollsters, said recently in the Beijing Review: "Only five or six years ago, the public opinion poll was considered to be a 'bourgeois' or 'capitalist' method of social survey ... Now the taboo has been swept away in the strong tide of reform, which is challenging all of China's traditions, stereotypes and prejudices."


Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn Aug 2010

Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn

David S. Mason

As the People's Republic of China shifts toward a more market-oriented economic system, it has also begun exploring another Western institution: scientific public opinion polling. As Yang Guansan, one of China's leading pollsters, said recently in the Beijing Review: "Only five or six years ago, the public opinion poll was considered to be a 'bourgeois' or 'capitalist' method of social survey ... Now the taboo has been swept away in the strong tide of reform, which is challenging all of China's traditions, stereotypes and prejudices."


Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn Aug 2010

Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn

David S. Mason

As the People's Republic of China shifts toward a more market-oriented economic system, it has also begun exploring another Western institution: scientific public opinion polling. As Yang Guansan, one of China's leading pollsters, said recently in the Beijing Review: "Only five or six years ago, the public opinion poll was considered to be a 'bourgeois' or 'capitalist' method of social survey ... Now the taboo has been swept away in the strong tide of reform, which is challenging all of China's traditions, stereotypes and prejudices."


Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn Mar 2010

Public Opinion Reform In China, David S. Mason, Ken Colburn

David S. Mason

As the People's Republic of China shifts toward a more market-oriented economic system, it has also begun exploring another Western institution: scientific public opinion polling. As Yang Guansan, one of China's leading pollsters, said recently in the Beijing Review: "Only five or six years ago, the public opinion poll was considered to be a 'bourgeois' or 'capitalist' method of social survey ... Now the taboo has been swept away in the strong tide of reform, which is challenging all of China's traditions, stereotypes and prejudices."


The Government Shareholder: Regulating Public Ownership Of Private Enterprise, Benjamin A. Templin Jan 2010

The Government Shareholder: Regulating Public Ownership Of Private Enterprise, Benjamin A. Templin

Benjamin A. Templin

During the subprime financial crisis of 2007-2009, the U.S. transformed its policies from a focus on privatization and deregulation to one where the government plays an active role as a market participant. By the end of the 2009 fiscal year, the U.S. government became one of the largest shareholders in the world owning a portfolio of investments valued at $959 billion. Some pundits condemned the investments as socialism. The sudden increase in the government portfolio is better understood as a Keynesian response to market failure rather than a change in the political economy. However, the dramatic increase in ...


Black Tuesday And Graying The Legitimacy Line For Governmental Intervention: When Tomorrow Is Just A Future Yesterday, Donald J. Kochan Dec 2009

Black Tuesday And Graying The Legitimacy Line For Governmental Intervention: When Tomorrow Is Just A Future Yesterday, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

Black Tuesday in October 1929 marked a major crisis in American history. As we face current economic woes, it is appropriate to recall not only the event but also reflect on how it altered the legal landscape and the change it precipitated in the acceptance of governmental intervention into the marketplace. Perceived or real crises can cause us to dance between free markets and regulatory power. Much like the events of 1929, current financial concerns have led to new, unprecedented governmental intervention into the private sector. This Article seeks caution, on the basis of history, arguing that fear and crisis ...