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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Pluralism, Relativism, And Liberalism, Matthew J. Moore Dec 2010

Pluralism, Relativism, And Liberalism, Matthew J. Moore

Matthew Moore

One major focus of recent value-pluralist literature has been the question of what normative consequences follow from pluralism. This essay critically examines three arguments that attempt to show that either liberalism or a bounded modus vivendi is the state of affairs that pluralism makes morally preferable. All three arguments are shown to encounter the same fundamental problem—once we have agreed that values and sets of values are unrankable, any effort to claim that one such set is morally preferable will inevitably contradict value pluralism, either explicitly or implicitly. If this is correct, it seems that pluralism leads to relativism.


E Pluribus Unum? (Geopolitica), Steven Alan Samson Aug 2010

E Pluribus Unum? (Geopolitica), Steven Alan Samson

Steven Alan Samson

No abstract provided.


State Ideology And The Kurds In Turkey, Neophytos Loizides Jul 2010

State Ideology And The Kurds In Turkey, Neophytos Loizides

Neophytos Loizides

This article evaluates theories of nationalism by examining the formation of Kurdish nationalism in Turkey. It deals particularly with the various manifestations of contemporary Kurdish minority question and provides an account for the late development of Kurdish nationalism in Turkey. It situates the Kurdish experience within the broader experience of the post-Ottoman world and analyzes the awakening of Kurdish national identity among broader segments of the population. It provides an alternative to Ernest Gellner’s functionalist account of nationalism and industrialization by stressing the link between state policies and minority nationalism. It considers the political, social and other implications of ...


Yitzhak Rabin And The Price Of Peace, Steven Alan Samson Jun 2010

Yitzhak Rabin And The Price Of Peace, Steven Alan Samson

Steven Alan Samson

A society that wishes to remain free and self-governing must learn to recognize that endemic political violence, including the symbolic violence of character assassination, is an invitation to either tyranny from without or conquest from without. As Edmund Burke put it: ‘Men of intemperate minds cannot be free; their passions forge their fetters.” As a general rule, we might conclude that a fixation on the purity of political outcomes at the expense of the integrity of the political process leads people away from politics to the realm of ideology, from civility to fanaticism. This is the way nations and civilizations ...


“Pilot Implementation Of An Interdisciplinary Course On Climate Solutions”, Lawrence Quill, Jinny Rhee, Eugene Cordero Apr 2010

“Pilot Implementation Of An Interdisciplinary Course On Climate Solutions”, Lawrence Quill, Jinny Rhee, Eugene Cordero

Lawrence Quill

A pilot implementation of an experimental interdisciplinary course on climate solutions was undertaken at San Jose´ State University in the fall semester of 2008. The course, co-taught by seven faculty members from six colleges, was approved for a general education requirement and was open to upperclass students campus-wide. A course with such a breadth of topics and range of student backgrounds was the first of its kind here. The lessons learned from the pilot effort were assessed from student, faculty, and administrative perspectives. The educational benefits to students from the interdisciplinary format were found to be substantial, in addition to ...


International Soft Law, Andrew T. Guzman, Timothy L. Meyer Mar 2010

International Soft Law, Andrew T. Guzman, Timothy L. Meyer

Timothy Meyer

Although the concept of soft law has existed for years, scholars have not reached consensus on why states use soft law or even whether “soft law” is a meaningful analytic category. In part, this confusion reflects a deep diversity both in the types of international agreements that states employ, and in the strategic situations that produce these agreements. In this paper, we advance four complementary explanations for why states use soft law. Our explanations account for a much broader range of state behavior than the existing literature is able to explain.

First, and least significantly, states may use soft law ...


Dilemmas Of Justice And Reconciliation: Rwandans And The Gacaca Courts, Amaka Megwalu, Neophytos Loizides Mar 2010

Dilemmas Of Justice And Reconciliation: Rwandans And The Gacaca Courts, Amaka Megwalu, Neophytos Loizides

Neophytos Loizides

Following the 1994 genocide, several justice initiatives were implemented in Rwanda, including a tribunal established by the United Nations, Rwanda’s national court system and Gacaca, a ‘traditional’ community-run conflict resolution mechanism adapted to prosecute genocide perpetrators. Since their inception in 2001, the Gacaca courts have been praised for their efficiency and for widening participation but criticized for lack of due process, trained personnel and attention to atrocities committed by the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF). To evaluate these criticisms, we survey 227 Rwandans and analyze their attitudes towards Gacaca in relation to demographic characteristics such as education, residence and loss ...


The Way Home: Peaceful Return For Victims Of Ethnic Cleansing, Djordje Stefanovic, Neophytos Loizides Jan 2010

The Way Home: Peaceful Return For Victims Of Ethnic Cleansing, Djordje Stefanovic, Neophytos Loizides

Neophytos Loizides

This article examines how the right of return is negotiated and implemented in post-conflict societies. It focuses on cases of voluntary yet ‘difficult’ return and identifies the conditions under which victims of ethnic cleansing choose to return to their homes despite opposition from new occupants and local authorities. The article provides a theoretical framework for the study of return looking at security provisions, incentives, contact and ideology. Drawing on the experiences of Bosnian (Drvar) and Cypriot (Maronite) returnees, it emphasizes the role of social capital and demonstrates how community effort resolves coordination and commitment problems and facilitates voluntary peaceful return.


Delaying Truth Recovery For Missing Persons, Iosif Kovras, Neophytos G. Loizides Jan 2010

Delaying Truth Recovery For Missing Persons, Iosif Kovras, Neophytos G. Loizides

Neophytos Loizides

The fate of missing persons is a central issue in post-conflict societies facing truth recovery and human rights dilemmas. Despite widespread public sympathy towards relatives, societies emerging from conflict often defer the recovery of missing for decades. More paradoxically, in post-1974 Cyprus, the official authorities delayed unilateral exhumations of victims buried within cemeteries in their own jurisdiction. Analysis of official post-1974 discourse reveals a Greek-Cypriot consensus to emphasise the issue as one of Turkish aggression, thus downplaying in-group responsibilities and the legacy of intra-communal violence. We compare the experience of Cyprus with other post-conflict societies such as Spain, Northern Ireland ...


The Bureau Of Municipal Research And The Development Of A Professional Public Service, Bruce D. Mcdonald Iii Jan 2010

The Bureau Of Municipal Research And The Development Of A Professional Public Service, Bruce D. Mcdonald Iii

Bruce D. McDonald, III

This paper explores the professionalization of public administration in terms of its relation to the New York Bureau of Municipal Research. The formation of the New York Bureau of Municipal Research in 1907 served as the catalyst for the creation and expansion of a professional public service. Though public administration has failed to transform into a profession, this paper shows that the Bureau contributed to professionalization by (1) developing a body of knowledge and theory for the field; (2) developing a school in which to train persons in that knowledge; and, (3) promoting a place that the training and knowledge ...


Counting The Cost, Marc A. Clauson Jan 2010

Counting The Cost, Marc A. Clauson

Marc A. Clauson, J.D., Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


The Role Of The Media In Electoral Behaviour: A Canadian Perspective, Paul W. Nesbitt-Larking Dec 2009

The Role Of The Media In Electoral Behaviour: A Canadian Perspective, Paul W. Nesbitt-Larking

Paul W Nesbitt-Larking

This work, divided in four sections, is a critical assessment of Canadian perspectives on the role of the media in electoral behaviour, notably on the roles media play in setting or responding to the agenda in the heat of election campaigns. The first section of the article highlights important Canadian methodological and empirical contributions to behaviouralism. The second section of the article, on culture, ideology, and discourse, illustrates general patterns of contrast between the Canadian and American political cultures through an exploration of the comparative role of negative and attack advertisements in election campaigns. The third section of the article ...


Media And Democracy: Recent Experiences From Canada And Mexico-An Introduction, Manuel A. Gurrero, Paul W. Nesbitt-Larking Dec 2009

Media And Democracy: Recent Experiences From Canada And Mexico-An Introduction, Manuel A. Gurrero, Paul W. Nesbitt-Larking

Paul W Nesbitt-Larking

No abstract provided.


Power, Exit Costs, And Renegotiation In International Law, Timothy L. Meyer Dec 2009

Power, Exit Costs, And Renegotiation In International Law, Timothy L. Meyer

Timothy Meyer

Scholars have long understood that the instability of power has ramifications for compliance with international law. Scholars have not, however, focused on how states’ expectations about shifting power affect the initial design of international agreements. In this paper, I integrate shifting power into an analysis of the initial design of both the formal and substantive aspects of agreements. I argue that a state expecting to become more powerful over time incurs an opportunity cost by agreeing to formal provisions that raise the cost of exiting an agreement. Exit costs – which promote the stability of legal rules – have distributional implications. Before ...