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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Influence Of International Organizations On Militarized Interstate Dispute Initiation And Duration, Megan Shannon, Daniel Morey, Frederick Boehmke Jan 2010

The Influence Of International Organizations On Militarized Interstate Dispute Initiation And Duration, Megan Shannon, Daniel Morey, Frederick Boehmke

Megan Shannon

No abstract provided.


Ngos And Political Participation In Weak Democracies: Sub National Evidence On Protest And Voter Turnout From Bolivia., Carew E. Boulding Jan 2010

Ngos And Political Participation In Weak Democracies: Sub National Evidence On Protest And Voter Turnout From Bolivia., Carew E. Boulding

Carew E Boulding

How do NGOs affect political participation in weakly democratic settings? We know that NGOs can be an important part of moderate civil society by building trust, facilitating collective action, and encouraging voter turnout. This paper explores these relationships in weakly democratic settings. NGOs stimulate political participation by providing resources and opportunities for association. Where voting is seen as ineffective, new participation can take the form of political protests and demonstrations. This paper presents results from an original local level dataset from Bolivia on NGO activity, voter turnout, and political protest, showing a strong relationship between NGO activity and political protest ...


Benefit-Cost Analysis Of Environmental Projects: A Plethora Of Systematic Biases, Philip E. Graves Jan 2010

Benefit-Cost Analysis Of Environmental Projects: A Plethora Of Systematic Biases, Philip E. Graves

PHILIP E GRAVES

There are many reasons to suspect that benefit-cost analysis applied to environmental policies will result in policy decisions that will reject those environmental policies. The important question, of course, is whether those rejections are based on proper science. The present paper explores sources of bias in the methods used to evaluate environmental policy in the United States, although most of the arguments translate immediately to decision-making in other countries. There are some “big picture” considerations that have gone unrecognized, and there are numerous more minor, yet cumulatively important, technical details that point to potentially large biases against acceptance on benefit-cost ...