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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Stato Moderno E Pubblico Ministero. Il Modello Brasiliano, Eduardo Meira Zauli Dr. Sep 2014

Stato Moderno E Pubblico Ministero. Il Modello Brasiliano, Eduardo Meira Zauli Dr.

Eduardo Meira Zauli

No abstract provided.


The Two-Seat Solution, Hippu Salk Kristle Nathan Mar 2014

The Two-Seat Solution, Hippu Salk Kristle Nathan

Hippu Salk Kristle Nathan

The article highlights the fallacy in the system of provisioning more than one constituency/seat to a single candidate in Lok Sabha or Assembly elections. It gives instances of how the veteran leaders have historically exploited this system. This is a violation of principle of equity, justice, and fairness as enshrined in the Constitution. This reminds the Orwellian saying: "All are equal, but some are more equal than others." The article proposes that the only way out is make a leader's candidature void if he or she files nomination from more than one constituency.


Public Reason As Higher Law, Gordon D. Ballingrud Jan 2014

Public Reason As Higher Law, Gordon D. Ballingrud

Gordon D Ballingrud

This paper presents a model of higher-law formation by employing a modified version of John Rawls’ idea of public reason. The model specifies a theory of public reason that combines the procedural and substantive aspects of public reason, and extends the concept over a third dimension, time. This concept, by virtue of its multi-generational democratic pedigree, forms a repository of political and legal concepts of justice that conform to the duty of civility, and the broad consensus on political and legal norms required of the content of public reason, which forms the overlapping consensus. Thus, public reason as higher law ...


Legitimation, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 2014

Legitimation, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Mark C Modak-Truran

This article identifies three different conceptions of legitimation - pre-modern, modern, and post-secular - that compete both within and across national boundaries for the coveted prize of informing the social imaginary regarding how the government and the law should be legitimated in constitutional democracies. Pre-modern conceptions of legitimation consider governments and rulers legitimate if they are ordained by God or if the political system is ordered in accordance with the normative cosmic order. Contemporary proponents of the pre-modern conception range from those in the United States who maintain that the government has been legitimated by the “Judeo-Christian tradition” to those in predominantly ...