Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Selected Works

PDF

American Politics

Institution
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication

Articles 1 - 30 of 512

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

"The Politics Of Deracialization: South Asian American Candidates, Nicknames, And Campaign Strategies", Shyam Sriram, Stonegarden Grindlife Dec 2105

"The Politics Of Deracialization: South Asian American Candidates, Nicknames, And Campaign Strategies", Shyam Sriram, Stonegarden Grindlife

Shyam K. Sriram (ssriram@butler.edu)

No abstract provided.


Through The Looking Glass: What Abortion Teaches Us About American Politics, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Through The Looking Glass: What Abortion Teaches Us About American Politics, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Tom Delay: Popular Constitutionalist?, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Tom Delay: Popular Constitutionalist?, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Federalism-Rights Nexus: Explaining Why Senate Democrats Tolerate Rehnquist Court Decision Making But Not The Rehnquist Court, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The Federalism-Rights Nexus: Explaining Why Senate Democrats Tolerate Rehnquist Court Decision Making But Not The Rehnquist Court, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Split Definitive, Lawrence Baum, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Split Definitive, Lawrence Baum, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

For the first time in a century, the Supreme Court is divided solely by political party.


The Youngstown Question And The Presidential Contest, Timothy Zick Sep 2019

The Youngstown Question And The Presidential Contest, Timothy Zick

Timothy Zick

No abstract provided.


Introduction: Reconstructing Liberalism, Cynthia V. Ward Sep 2019

Introduction: Reconstructing Liberalism, Cynthia V. Ward

Cynthia V. Ward

No abstract provided.


On Difference And Equality, Cynthia V. Ward Sep 2019

On Difference And Equality, Cynthia V. Ward

Cynthia V. Ward

No abstract provided.


Romney And Huntsman: Two Answers To The 'Mormon Question', Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

Romney And Huntsman: Two Answers To The 'Mormon Question', Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


Prosperity Versus Equality At The Polls, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

Prosperity Versus Equality At The Polls, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


Without Compromise, Fixing Deficit Is A Fairy Tale, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

Without Compromise, Fixing Deficit Is A Fairy Tale, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan Oman

No abstract provided.


The Mormon Plot That Wasn't, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

The Mormon Plot That Wasn't, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


The End Of The Great Fiscal Compromise, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

The End Of The Great Fiscal Compromise, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


Why Congress Does Not Challenge Judicial Supremacy, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Why Congress Does Not Challenge Judicial Supremacy, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

Members of Congress largely acquiesce to judicial supremacy both on constitutional and statutory interpretation questions. Lawmakers, however, do not formally embrace judicial supremacy; they rarely think about the courts when enacting legislation. This Article explains why this is so, focusing on why lawmakers have both strong incentive to acquiesce to judicial power and little incentive to advance a coherent view of congressional power. In particular, lawmakers are interested in advancing favored policies, winning reelection, and gaining personal power within Congress. Abstract questions of institutional power do not interest lawmakers and judicial defeats are seen as opportunities to find some other ...


Diminished Luster In Escambia County?, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Diminished Luster In Escambia County?, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Immature Citizens And The State, Vivian E. Hamilton Sep 2019

Immature Citizens And The State, Vivian E. Hamilton

Vivian E. Hamilton

Citizens are born, but they are also made. How its citizens come to be—whether the educations they receive will expand or constrain their future options, whether the values they assimilate will encourage or dissuade their civic engagement, etc.—fundamentally concerns the state. Through the power it wields over a vast range of policymaking contexts, the state can significantly influence (or designate those who will influence) many of the formative experiences of young citizens. Young citizens’ accumulated experiences in turn can significantly influence the future mature citizens they will become. The state insufficiently considers the cumulative nature of its citizens ...


The 1965 Voting Rights Act: Some Wrongs Still Not Righted, Neal Devins Sep 2019

The 1965 Voting Rights Act: Some Wrongs Still Not Righted, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


Bearing False Witness: The Clinton Impeachment And The Future Of Academic Freedom, Neal Devins Sep 2019

Bearing False Witness: The Clinton Impeachment And The Future Of Academic Freedom, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


A Loss Of Control: Privilege Cases Diminish Presidential Power, Neal Devins Sep 2019

A Loss Of Control: Privilege Cases Diminish Presidential Power, Neal Devins

Neal E. Devins

No abstract provided.


The Senate: Out Of Order?, Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl Sep 2019

The Senate: Out Of Order?, Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl

Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl

Due to the routine use of the filibuster and related devices, today’s Senate operates as a supermajoritarian body. This Symposium Article considers whether this supermajoritarian aspect of the Senate renders it dysfunctional and, if so, what can be done about it. I contend that the Senate is indeed broken. Its current supermajoritarian features have pernicious effects. Further, and contrary to the claims of many of the Senate’s defenders, this aspect of the Senate is not part of the original design. I go on to explain why the Senate’s procedures, despite their deficiencies, have nonetheless proven resistant to ...


Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity Lilliana Mason, Chicago: University Of Chicago Press, 2018, Pp. 192., David A. M. Peterson Sep 2019

Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity Lilliana Mason, Chicago: University Of Chicago Press, 2018, Pp. 192., David A. M. Peterson

David A. M. Peterson

Lilliana Mason's Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity is easily the best book on American politics I have read in years. I mean this in two important ways. First, the book tackles what may be the most pressing question in politics: Why has the American public become increasing polarized? The answer—that the increasing overlap between identities changes the way that citizens see themselves and others—provides a clear understanding of polarization. But this is not only an important book, it is a good book. Mason constructs a careful argument, grounded in social psychology, and each chapter in ...


Politics, Identity, And Class Certification On The U.S. Courts Of Appeals, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang Aug 2019

Politics, Identity, And Class Certification On The U.S. Courts Of Appeals, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang

Sean Farhang

This article draws on novel data and presents the results of the first empirical analysis of how potentially salient characteristics of Court of Appeals judges influence precedential lawmaking on class certification under Rule 23. We find that the partisan composition of the panel (measured by the party of the appointing president) has a very strong association with certification outcomes, with all-Democratic panels having more than double the certification rate of all-Republican panels in precedential cases. We also find that the presence of one African American on a panel, and the presence of two females (but not one), is associated with ...


Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

Government officials who run administrative agencies must make countless decisions every day about what issues and work to prioritize. These agenda-setting decisions hold enormous implications for the shape of law and public policy, but they have received remarkably little attention by either administrative law scholars or social scientists who study the bureaucracy. Existing research offers few insights about the institutions, norms, and inputs that shape and constrain agency discretion over their agendas or about the strategies that officials employ in choosing to elevate certain issues while putting others on the back burner. In this article, we advance the study of ...


Capturing Regulatory Agendas?: An Empirical Study Of Industry Use Of Rulemaking Petitions, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

Capturing Regulatory Agendas?: An Empirical Study Of Industry Use Of Rulemaking Petitions, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

A great deal of skepticism toward administrative agencies stems from the widespread perception that they excessively or even exclusively cater to business interests. From the political right comes the accusation that business interests use regulation to erect barriers to entry that protect profits and stifle competition. From the political left comes the claim that business interests use secretive interactions with agencies to erode and negate beneficial regulatory programs. Regulatory “capture” theory elevates many of these claims to the status of economic law. Despite growing skepticism about capture theory in academic circles, empirical studies of business influence and capture return ambiguous ...


The Judicial Role In Constraining Presidential Nonenforcement Discretion: The Virtues Of An Apa Approach, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

The Judicial Role In Constraining Presidential Nonenforcement Discretion: The Virtues Of An Apa Approach, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

Scholars, lawyers, and, indeed, the public at large increasingly worry about what purposive presidential inaction in enforcing statutory programs means for the rule of law and how such discretionary inaction can fit within a constitutional structure that compels Presidents to “take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed." Yet those who have recognized the problem have been hesitant to assign a role for the court in policing the constitutional limits they articulate, mostly because of the strain on judicial capacity that any formulation of Take Care Clause review would cause. In this Article, I argue that courts still can and ...


Practical Representation And The Multiracial Social Movement, Vernon D. Johnson, Kelsie Benslimane Jul 2019

Practical Representation And The Multiracial Social Movement, Vernon D. Johnson, Kelsie Benslimane

Vernon D. Johnson

The issue of representation has been brought to us by scholars in social theory, ethnic and women’s studies, and literary and cultural criticism. In political science representation became an issue as various social movements became concerned with their empowerment. This work is focused on the social movement side of the study of representation. It is concerned with the political construction of racial identity and movements for empowerment based upon those identities. Utilizing Stuart Hall’s theory of representation (1997); and building upon Winant’s model of racial hegemonic projects (1990), this paper identifies ideas and practices of racial identity ...


Political Opportunism, Position Taking, And Court-Curbing Legislation., Laura Moyer, Ellen M. Key Jun 2019

Political Opportunism, Position Taking, And Court-Curbing Legislation., Laura Moyer, Ellen M. Key

Laura Moyer

Although there is extensive scholarship on court-curbing efforts directed at the U.S. Supreme Court, much less is known about bills targeting the lower federal courts. This article argues that members of Congress also engage in position taking with respect to the U.S. Courts of Appeals, by proposing legislation to divide up the Ninth Circuit. Over seven decades, no other circuit has attracted as much court-curbing legislation as the Ninth Circuit, and yet no bill has succeeded. What accounts for this persistent focus on one court? We argue that bill sponsors are motivated primarily by electoral considerations and capitalize ...


End Of The World Handout, Lisa Di Valentino, Sarah C. Hutton May 2019

End Of The World Handout, Lisa Di Valentino, Sarah C. Hutton

Lisa Di Valentino

No abstract provided.


Daleyd_Abelt_Stephanm_2019_Us_Climate_Risk_Governance_Efficacy_Wpsa_Final.Pdf, Dorothy Daley, Troy D. Abel, Mark Stephan Apr 2019

Daleyd_Abelt_Stephanm_2019_Us_Climate_Risk_Governance_Efficacy_Wpsa_Final.Pdf, Dorothy Daley, Troy D. Abel, Mark Stephan

Troy D. Abel

In the United States, the political and governance challenges embedded in climate change
are perhaps the most daunting. While conventional logic holds that national and international
action is needed to address a problem of this magnitude, within the United States, subnational
governments have been considerably more active in pursuing climate change mitigation policy
compared to their federal counterparts. We take up Elinor Ostrom's charge to consider
polycentric climate governance and evaluate the extent to which subnational policy initiatives
improve GHG emission trends. In this paper, we explore different types of subnational policy
approaches to minimize GHG emissions. We capitalize ...


The Misunderstood Alliance: Defining The American And Pakistani Relationship, Zachary Joseph Shapiro Apr 2019

The Misunderstood Alliance: Defining The American And Pakistani Relationship, Zachary Joseph Shapiro

Joseph I Shapiro MD

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Social Studies of Bard College.