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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

A Socio-Demographic Analysis Of Responses To Terrorism, Gabriel Rubin, Christopher Salvatore Oct 2019

A Socio-Demographic Analysis Of Responses To Terrorism, Gabriel Rubin, Christopher Salvatore

Christopher Salvatore

Extensive research has found that there are differences in reported levels of fear of crime and associated protective actions influenced by socio-demographic characteristics such as race and gender. Further studies, the majority of which focused on violent and property crime, have found that specific demographic characteristics influence fear of crime and protective behaviors. However, little research has focused on the influence of socio-demographic characteristics on perceptions, and protective actions in response to the threat of terrorism. Using data from the General Social Survey, this study compared individual-level protective actions and perceptions of the effectiveness of protective responses to the 9 ...


Spitting Bullets: Anger’S Long-Ignored Role In Reactions To Terror: An Examination Of College Students’ Fear And Anger Responses To Terrorism, Gabriel Rubin, Christopher Salvatore Oct 2019

Spitting Bullets: Anger’S Long-Ignored Role In Reactions To Terror: An Examination Of College Students’ Fear And Anger Responses To Terrorism, Gabriel Rubin, Christopher Salvatore

Christopher Salvatore

This study seeks to capture the responses of regular Americans to explore if the role of anger in responses to terror attacks, with the goal of answering two related questions: 1) Is anger an essential emotion in public reactions to terror attacks? and 2) What are the ramifications of including anger in a model of public reactions to terrorism? This paper argues that many of the negative aspects of responses to terrorism come from the anger that terrorism invokes in victim populations. Anger elicits the desire for revenge in the victim population as well as distrust of the terrorists' co-ethnics ...


Countering Violent Extremism In Trinidad And Tobago: An Evaluation, Daniel P. Aldrich, Raghunath Mahabir Sep 2019

Countering Violent Extremism In Trinidad And Tobago: An Evaluation, Daniel P. Aldrich, Raghunath Mahabir

Daniel P Aldrich

Much research has focused on explaining the very high rate of radicalization among a small number of Caribbean island nations. This paper instead investigates the history and current status of countering violent extremism policies in Trinidad and Tobago, focusing on government, international partners, and local NGO programming in the field. Through an analysis of extended interviews with grassroots organizations, politicians, and members of the security administration alongside a desk review of existing literature and evaluations of CVE programming, we seek to illuminate gaps between official policies and actual, on the ground practices. While authorities in Trinidad and Tobago have recognized ...


Politics, Identity, And Class Certification On The U.S. Courts Of Appeals, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang Aug 2019

Politics, Identity, And Class Certification On The U.S. Courts Of Appeals, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang

Sean Farhang

This article draws on novel data and presents the results of the first empirical analysis of how potentially salient characteristics of Court of Appeals judges influence precedential lawmaking on class certification under Rule 23. We find that the partisan composition of the panel (measured by the party of the appointing president) has a very strong association with certification outcomes, with all-Democratic panels having more than double the certification rate of all-Republican panels in precedential cases. We also find that the presence of one African American on a panel, and the presence of two females (but not one), is associated with ...


Définition De Guerre Civile.Pdf, Rachid Elaïdi Aug 2019

Définition De Guerre Civile.Pdf, Rachid Elaïdi

Rachid ELAÏDI

il y a toujours un début à une guerre civile mais jamais une fin ,à condition que l'Etat en question est le même ,en comportement politique,en réaction...


Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

Government officials who run administrative agencies must make countless decisions every day about what issues and work to prioritize. These agenda-setting decisions hold enormous implications for the shape of law and public policy, but they have received remarkably little attention by either administrative law scholars or social scientists who study the bureaucracy. Existing research offers few insights about the institutions, norms, and inputs that shape and constrain agency discretion over their agendas or about the strategies that officials employ in choosing to elevate certain issues while putting others on the back burner. In this article, we advance the study of ...


Capturing Regulatory Agendas?: An Empirical Study Of Industry Use Of Rulemaking Petitions, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

Capturing Regulatory Agendas?: An Empirical Study Of Industry Use Of Rulemaking Petitions, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

A great deal of skepticism toward administrative agencies stems from the widespread perception that they excessively or even exclusively cater to business interests. From the political right comes the accusation that business interests use regulation to erect barriers to entry that protect profits and stifle competition. From the political left comes the claim that business interests use secretive interactions with agencies to erode and negate beneficial regulatory programs. Regulatory “capture” theory elevates many of these claims to the status of economic law. Despite growing skepticism about capture theory in academic circles, empirical studies of business influence and capture return ambiguous ...


The Judicial Role In Constraining Presidential Nonenforcement Discretion: The Virtues Of An Apa Approach, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

The Judicial Role In Constraining Presidential Nonenforcement Discretion: The Virtues Of An Apa Approach, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

Scholars, lawyers, and, indeed, the public at large increasingly worry about what purposive presidential inaction in enforcing statutory programs means for the rule of law and how such discretionary inaction can fit within a constitutional structure that compels Presidents to “take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed." Yet those who have recognized the problem have been hesitant to assign a role for the court in policing the constitutional limits they articulate, mostly because of the strain on judicial capacity that any formulation of Take Care Clause review would cause. In this Article, I argue that courts still can and ...


Urban Tree Survival And Stewardship In A State-Managed Planting Initiative: A Case Study In Holyoke, Massachusetts, Benjamin S. Breger, Theodore S. Eisenman, Madison E. Kremer, Lara A. Roman, Deborah G. Martin, John Rogan Jul 2019

Urban Tree Survival And Stewardship In A State-Managed Planting Initiative: A Case Study In Holyoke, Massachusetts, Benjamin S. Breger, Theodore S. Eisenman, Madison E. Kremer, Lara A. Roman, Deborah G. Martin, John Rogan

Theodore S. Eisenman

Stewardship is essential for the survival of trees planted in challenging urban conditions and for reaching canopy
cover goals and anticipated benefits. The governance structure of the stewardship network can dictate stewardship
efficacy and ultimately, tree survival. While many planting initiatives are managed locally, the stewardship
network and survival rates of a state-managed initiative are not commonly addressed in scholarly literature.
The Greening the Gateway Cities Program (GGCP) in Massachusetts is planting thousands of trees in
post-industrial cities around the state. We carried out a mixed-methods case study of 2014 to 2016 tree planting
in Holyoke, a GGCP pilot city ...


Daleyd_Abelt_Stephanm_2019_Us_Climate_Risk_Governance_Efficacy_Wpsa_Final.Pdf, Dorothy Daley, Troy D. Abel, Mark Stephan Apr 2019

Daleyd_Abelt_Stephanm_2019_Us_Climate_Risk_Governance_Efficacy_Wpsa_Final.Pdf, Dorothy Daley, Troy D. Abel, Mark Stephan

Troy D. Abel

In the United States, the political and governance challenges embedded in climate change
are perhaps the most daunting. While conventional logic holds that national and international
action is needed to address a problem of this magnitude, within the United States, subnational
governments have been considerably more active in pursuing climate change mitigation policy
compared to their federal counterparts. We take up Elinor Ostrom's charge to consider
polycentric climate governance and evaluate the extent to which subnational policy initiatives
improve GHG emission trends. In this paper, we explore different types of subnational policy
approaches to minimize GHG emissions. We capitalize ...


No Witness, No Case: An Assessment Of The Conduct And Quality Of Icc Investigations, Dermot Groome Apr 2019

No Witness, No Case: An Assessment Of The Conduct And Quality Of Icc Investigations, Dermot Groome

Dermot M Groome

The conduct and quality of investigations pursued by the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court have come under increasing scrutiny and criticism from judges on the Court. Criticism is directed at the time and length of investigations; the quality of the evidence advanced in court; the inappropriate delegation of investigative functions, and the failure to interview witnesses in a way that is consistent with the Prosecution’s obligation to conduct investigations fairly under Article 54 of the Rome Statute. This essay explores these criticisms and concludes that the judges are justified in their concerns regarding the Prosecution ...


Habeas Corpus In The Age Of Guantánamo, Cary Federman Apr 2019

Habeas Corpus In The Age Of Guantánamo, Cary Federman

Cary Federman

The purpose of the article is to examine the meaning of habeas corpus in the age of the war on terror and the detention camps at Guantanamo Bay. Since the war on terror was declared in 2001, the writ has been invoked from quarters not normally considered within the federal courts’ domain. In this article, I set out to do two things: first, I provide an overview of the writ’s history in the United States and explain its connection to federalism and unlawful executive detention. I then set out to bridge the two meanings of habeas corpus. Second, then ...


A Socio-Demographic Analysis Of Responses To Terrorism, Gabriel Rubin, Christopher Salvatore Mar 2019

A Socio-Demographic Analysis Of Responses To Terrorism, Gabriel Rubin, Christopher Salvatore

Gabriel Rubin

Extensive research has found that there are differences in reported levels of fear of crime and associated protective actions influenced by socio-demographic characteristics such as race and gender. Further studies, the majority of which focused on violent and property crime, have found that specific demographic characteristics influence fear of crime and protective behaviors. However, little research has focused on the influence of socio-demographic characteristics on perceptions, and protective actions in response to the threat of terrorism. Using data from the General Social Survey, this study compared individual-level protective actions and perceptions of the effectiveness of protective responses to the 9 ...


Fear Or Rage?: Assessing Public Opinion And Policy Responses To Terrorist Attacks, Gabriel Rubin Mar 2019

Fear Or Rage?: Assessing Public Opinion And Policy Responses To Terrorist Attacks, Gabriel Rubin

Gabriel Rubin

Mass fear has been posited as the main emotional outcome of terror attacks. Indeed, the term “terrorism” itself emphasizes that such attacks are meant to stoke fear. Yet, a critical piece of the post-terror attack dynamic has been largely ignored: the public rage that comes in response to terror attacks. Witness the call for politicians to step down after the November 2008 attacks in Mumbai or the placard reading “Nuke ‘Em Till They Glow” at the 2001 World Series. It is the contention of this paper that, after a major terror attack has occurred, the public is more angry than ...


She Who Laughs Loudest: A Meditation On Zen Humor, Andrew Whitehead Mar 2019

She Who Laughs Loudest: A Meditation On Zen Humor, Andrew Whitehead

Andrew K. Whitehead

Articulating a Zen Buddhist perspective on humor, this paper examines the Japanese Zen Buddhist response of humor in the face of the suffering of situated existence and the motivations for this response. The examination will take the school of Rinzai Zen Buddhism as its exemplar. I argue that in order to appreciate the function of humor in Zen a number of cultural and historical influences must be considered: correlative ontology; the Buddhist notion of emptiness; the impotence of language; sense and nonsense; and the senselessness of transgression.


Translating Scholarship Into Policy, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Amy C. Gaudion Jan 2019

Translating Scholarship Into Policy, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Amy C. Gaudion

Amy C. Gaudion

There is an ever widening gap between conflict resolution policy makers and scholars—a tragedy given practitioners’ dire need for new ideas to help resolve deadly conflicts and the growing knowledge researchers have to share. Research tends to swing like a pendulum between analytic and rigorous methods and accessible and relevant approaches. We reject this tradeoff. We believe that research can be simultaneously rigorous and relevant, and analytic and accessible. Given the devastating loss of life associated with armed conflict, the need for translating research results into policy prescriptions is especially strong in peacemaking. The goal of this issue of ...


Sex Segregation As Policy Problem: A Gendered Policy Paradox, Elizabeth Sharrow Jan 2019

Sex Segregation As Policy Problem: A Gendered Policy Paradox, Elizabeth Sharrow

Elizabeth Sharrow


2017 marked the forty-fifth anniversary of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, a sex non-discrimination policy which remade American education and athletics. Has Title IX fulfilled its promise to end discriminatory and disparate treatment of women in educational institutions? This article places policy in conversation with scholarly debate over tackling persistent sex and gender inequalities, illustrating that the athletic policy sphere sits at the center of both addressing and reproducing sexism.  It examines the under-appreciated complexity of sex equity politics and suggests the need to question how well public policy addresses inequalities.  It argues that we are losing ...


Canal Boy To President 1881 Miller Ed.Pdf, Jon Miller Aug 2018

Canal Boy To President 1881 Miller Ed.Pdf, Jon Miller

Jon Miller

No abstract provided.


Abelt_2018_Seattle's_Segregated_Soundscape_21jul.Pdf, Troy D. Abel Jul 2018

Abelt_2018_Seattle's_Segregated_Soundscape_21jul.Pdf, Troy D. Abel

Troy D. Abel

No abstract provided.


Alma Mater, Mater Exulum. Jesuit Education And Immigration In America: A Moral Framework Rooted In History And Mission, Michael M. Canaris Jan 2018

Alma Mater, Mater Exulum. Jesuit Education And Immigration In America: A Moral Framework Rooted In History And Mission, Michael M. Canaris

Michael Canaris

Book Description: The current daily experiences of undocumented students as they navigate the processes of entering and then thriving in Jesuit colleges are explored alongside an investigation of the knowledge and attitudes among staff and faculty about undocumented students in their midst, and the institutional response to their presence. Cutting across the fields of U.S. immigration policy, theory and history, religion, law, and education, Undocumented and in College delineates the historical and present-day contexts of immigration, including the role of religious institutions. This unique volume, based on an extensive two-year study (2010-12) of undocumented students at Jesuit colleges in ...


Will Clean Air Fade Away?, Mojtaba Sadegh, Jennifer Pierce, Amir Aghakouchak, Nancy F. Glenn, Cynthia Curl Jan 2018

Will Clean Air Fade Away?, Mojtaba Sadegh, Jennifer Pierce, Amir Aghakouchak, Nancy F. Glenn, Cynthia Curl

Jennifer L. Pierce

Government-sponsored research and regulations enabled western U.S. states to clean up their air, despite industrial and population growth. Proposed funding cuts could undo this progress.


A Political Theory Of Kulturkampf: Evidence From Imperial Prussia & Republican Turkey, Ioannis N. Grigoriadis, Theocharis Grigoriadis Jan 2018

A Political Theory Of Kulturkampf: Evidence From Imperial Prussia & Republican Turkey, Ioannis N. Grigoriadis, Theocharis Grigoriadis

Theocharis Grigoriadis

No abstract provided.


Global Politics Of Climate Change, Rodger A. Payne Dec 2017

Global Politics Of Climate Change, Rodger A. Payne

Rodger A. Payne

No abstract provided.


Will Hicks.Jpg, Will Hicks Dec 2017

Will Hicks.Jpg, Will Hicks

Dr. William D. Hicks

No abstract provided.


Constrained Behavior: Understanding The Entrenchment Of Legislative Procedure In American State Constitutional Law, Nancy Martorano Miller, Keith E. Hamm, Ronald D. Hedlund Nov 2017

Constrained Behavior: Understanding The Entrenchment Of Legislative Procedure In American State Constitutional Law, Nancy Martorano Miller, Keith E. Hamm, Ronald D. Hedlund

Nancy M. Miller

Political analysts have suggested that policy power will begin to shift from the federal government to state governments as gridlock in Congress persists. Therefore, understanding the policymaking process at the state level is more important than ever. Vitally missing from our understanding of policymaking in the states is the role of constitutional provisions. Many state constitutions contain directives that severely limit the ability of the legislature to act. Some of these directives are procedural while others are more substantive. This is relevant because constitutional rules are more difficult for members to alter than chamber rules. In this paper we present ...


Evolutionary Paths And Confining Cages: The Genealogy Of American State Constitutions, Nancy Martorano Miller Nov 2017

Evolutionary Paths And Confining Cages: The Genealogy Of American State Constitutions, Nancy Martorano Miller

Nancy M. Miller

With this poster, Dr. Miller explained her work to identify how provisions and concepts in state constitutions are related to one another and evolved over time and to understand how the provisions in these documents impact the work of state officials in the policymaking process.

Her goals: 1. Provide a “genealogical” mapping of state constitutional evolution that will allow the testing of path dependency and other theories of institutional development. 2. Create a series of scores that can be used to assess the extent to which a state government’s capacity to act in a specific policy area (e.g ...


Undergraduate Research Needs: Faculty-Librarian Collaboration To Improve Information Literacy In Policy Papers, Michelle C. Pautz, Heidi Gauder Oct 2017

Undergraduate Research Needs: Faculty-Librarian Collaboration To Improve Information Literacy In Policy Papers, Michelle C. Pautz, Heidi Gauder

Heidi Gauder

To improve the quality of semester-long policy projects of upper-division political science students, a faculty member and research librarian collaborated to reframe the assignment in hopes of improving students’ research skills and information literacy, revising the traditional one-way model of faculty sending students to the library to get information. The outcomes over the course of two semesters have been promising. Citations in two sets of student papers showed a remarkable increase in the number and quality of sources used. This suggests that when faculty work with librarians throughout the semester, such collaboration can improve students’ information literacy and thus their ...


Undergraduate Research Needs: Faculty-Librarian Collaboration To Improve Information Literacy In Policy Papers, Michelle C. Pautz, Heidi Gauder Oct 2017

Undergraduate Research Needs: Faculty-Librarian Collaboration To Improve Information Literacy In Policy Papers, Michelle C. Pautz, Heidi Gauder

Michelle Pautz

To improve the quality of semester-long policy projects of upper-division political science students, a faculty member and research librarian collaborated to reframe the assignment in hopes of improving students’ research skills and information literacy, revising the traditional one-way model of faculty sending students to the library to get information. The outcomes over the course of two semesters have been promising. Citations in two sets of student papers showed a remarkable increase in the number and quality of sources used. This suggests that when faculty work with librarians throughout the semester, such collaboration can improve students’ information literacy and thus their ...


Marketing An End To War: Constructive Engagement, Community Wellbeing, And Sustainable Peace, Clifford J. Shultz Sep 2017

Marketing An End To War: Constructive Engagement, Community Wellbeing, And Sustainable Peace, Clifford J. Shultz

Clifford J Shultz

Markets and marketing are integral to human welfare and survival. When used however for the purposes of war and other systemically violent conflict, they can be devastating and pose an existential threat to humanity. Drawing on experience in war-ravaged and recovering economies, the author examines a stream of research on marketing systems disrupted or destroyed by war. Some underlying conditions and predictors of war and its peaceful resolution are introduced, including social traps and their mitigation or elimination. An argument is revisited for marketing as a form of constructive engagement, which must be implemented to affect and to develop equitable ...


Research Offers Tough Love To Improve Human Rights Practices, Joel Pruce Sep 2017

Research Offers Tough Love To Improve Human Rights Practices, Joel Pruce

Joel Pruce

We know what it means to practice a skill such as juggling or dancing, but what does it mean to "practice" human rights? Contributions to OpenGlobalRights (OGR), since its inception, have gravitated around critique of human rights practices by focusing on advocacy and activism, cultivating debates that address the contemporary dilemmas facing human rights movements worldwide. The launch of OGR four years ago is a symptom of what I’ve referred to elsewhere as a “practice turn” in the scholarly field of human rights—one that takes human rights practice as its subject, forges space for scholar-practitioner collaboration and communication ...