Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 19 of 19

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Habeas Corpus In The Age Of Guantánamo, Cary Federman Apr 2019

Habeas Corpus In The Age Of Guantánamo, Cary Federman

Cary Federman

The purpose of the article is to examine the meaning of habeas corpus in the age of the war on terror and the detention camps at Guantanamo Bay. Since the war on terror was declared in 2001, the writ has been invoked from quarters not normally considered within the federal courts’ domain. In this article, I set out to do two things: first, I provide an overview of the writ’s history in the United States and explain its connection to federalism and unlawful executive detention. I then set out to bridge the two meanings of habeas corpus. Second, then ...


International Justice: Bringing The World Home Through Social Justice, Gabriel Rubin Mar 2019

International Justice: Bringing The World Home Through Social Justice, Gabriel Rubin

Gabriel Rubin

As the head of my university’s new International Justice program, I am well placed to speak about the trials and tribulations of teaching students about global politics. Our program draws in Sociology, Justice Studies, and Political Science students. The overarching goal is to make students aware of international issues ranging from genocide and terrorism to international migration and global institutions through the lens of social justice. The social justice lens is particularly effective because it provides a reason for exploring global issues. These issues are not bloodlessly described in my courses with the hopes of extracting causal variables. Instead ...


Effective Communication In Public Services In A Diverse Language And Cultural Landscape: A Challenge For Teaching And Training., John R. Fisher, Halil Asllani Dec 2018

Effective Communication In Public Services In A Diverse Language And Cultural Landscape: A Challenge For Teaching And Training., John R. Fisher, Halil Asllani

Dr. John R. Fisher

Constantly changing global events impact local policing and emergency services personnel in their roles as guarantors of safety and security. This paper extends research originally completed in the United States and compares the results with findings from Kosovo police. Police in both Kosovo and Utah (in the United States) serve minority populations. In Utah, the population that was once homogeneous is now very diverse. The population in Kosovo is becoming more and more homogeneous, but with some unique challenges for police and other public safety agencies. In Utah, these population changes have occurred because the state has become a magnet ...


Inaugural Issue Of Dignity, Donna M. Hughes Dr. Nov 2016

Inaugural Issue Of Dignity, Donna M. Hughes Dr.

Donna M. Hughes

No abstract provided.


Family Justice Centers: The Next Evolution In A Coordinated Community Response, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi Dec 2013

Family Justice Centers: The Next Evolution In A Coordinated Community Response, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi

Lisa Growette Bostaph

No abstract provided.


Crime Victims In Criminal Justice Curriculum: Are We There Yet?, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi, Patrick Brady, Christopher Beattie Dec 2013

Crime Victims In Criminal Justice Curriculum: Are We There Yet?, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi, Patrick Brady, Christopher Beattie

Lisa Growette Bostaph

While theoretical explanations, system response, and policy work on offenders and specific crime types are the backbone of criminal justice curricula in the U.S., a similar breadth and depth of education on crime victims appear to be lacking in traditional criminal justice curricula. This paper reports the results of a national study of 679 randomly selected criminal justice program curricula. Institutional, departmental, and course-level variables indicate that while victim-based research has proliferated, it does not mirror the extent to which victim-based courses are required in criminal justice programs. Theoretical, professional, and policy implications of the results are discussed.


Controversies In Policing, Quint Thurman, Andrew Giacomazzi Dec 2012

Controversies In Policing, Quint Thurman, Andrew Giacomazzi

Andrew Giacomazzi

No abstract provided.


Family Justice Centers: The Next Evolution In A Coordinated Community Response, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi Mar 2012

Family Justice Centers: The Next Evolution In A Coordinated Community Response, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi

Andrew Giacomazzi

No abstract provided.


Assessing The Process And Outcomes Of A Family Justice Center, Andrew Giacomazzi Mar 2012

Assessing The Process And Outcomes Of A Family Justice Center, Andrew Giacomazzi

Andrew Giacomazzi

No abstract provided.


How States Facilitate Small Arms Trafficking In Africa: A Theoretical And Juristic Interpretation, Jeffrey Ian Ross Ph.D. Dec 2011

How States Facilitate Small Arms Trafficking In Africa: A Theoretical And Juristic Interpretation, Jeffrey Ian Ross Ph.D.

Jeffrey Ian Ross Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


Crime Victims In Criminal Justice Curriculum: Are We There Yet?, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi, Patrick Brady, Christopher Beattie Oct 2011

Crime Victims In Criminal Justice Curriculum: Are We There Yet?, Lisa Bostaph, Andrew Giacomazzi, Patrick Brady, Christopher Beattie

Andrew Giacomazzi

While theoretical explanations, system response, and policy work on offenders and specific crime types are the backbone of criminal justice curricula in the U.S., a similar breadth and depth of education on crime victims appear to be lacking in traditional criminal justice curricula. This paper reports the results of a national study of 679 randomly selected criminal justice program curricula. Institutional, departmental, and course-level variables indicate that while victim-based research has proliferated, it does not mirror the extent to which victim-based courses are required in criminal justice programs. Theoretical, professional, and policy implications of the results are discussed.


Unanswered Questions Of A Minority People In International Law: A Comparative Study Between Southern Cameroons & South Sudan, Bernard Sama Mr Oct 2011

Unanswered Questions Of A Minority People In International Law: A Comparative Study Between Southern Cameroons & South Sudan, Bernard Sama Mr

Bernard Sama

The month July of 2011 marked the birth of another nation in the World. The distressful journey of a minority people under the watchful eyes of the international community finally paid off with a new nation called the South Sudan . As I watched the South Sudanese celebrate independence on 9 July 2011, I was filled with joy as though they have finally landed. On a promising note, I read the UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon saying “[t]ogether, we welcome the Republic of South Sudan to the community of nations. Together, we affirm our commitment to helping it meet its ...


A System Of Exemptions: Historicizing State Illegality In Indonesia, Robert Cribb Jan 2011

A System Of Exemptions: Historicizing State Illegality In Indonesia, Robert Cribb

Robert Cribb

No abstract provided.


Customary International Law In The 21st Century: Old Challenges And New Debates, Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker Jan 2010

Customary International Law In The 21st Century: Old Challenges And New Debates, Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker

Roozbeh (Rudy) B. Baker

This Article will survey the new scholarship that has emerged in international law to challenge the two traditional sources of customary norms, state practice and opinio juris. With the recent growth, in the international system, of self-contained international criminal tribunals, new challenges facing international law have emerged. Institutionally structured as self-contained legal regimes, international legal tribunals such as the ICTY, ICTR, and now the ICC have nevertheless contributed to a new paradigm within international law. The jurisprudence of these international criminal tribunals, on a wide range of international legal questions, has slowly begun to be elevated into norms of customary ...


Pro-Prosecution Judges: "Tough On Crime," Soft On Strategy, Ripe For Disqualification, Keith Swisher Dec 2009

Pro-Prosecution Judges: "Tough On Crime," Soft On Strategy, Ripe For Disqualification, Keith Swisher

Keith Swisher

In this Article, I take the most extensive look to date at pro-prosecution judges and ultimately advance the following, slightly scandalous claim: Particularly in our post-Caperton, political-realist world, “tough on crime” elective judges should recuse themselves from all criminal cases. The contextual parts to this claim are, in the main, a threefold description: (i) the "groundbreaking" Caperton v. A.T. Massey Coal decision, its predecessors, and its progeny; (ii) the judicial ethics of disqualification; and (iii) empirical and anecdotal evidence of pro-prosecution (commonly called "tough on crime") campaigns and attendant electoral pressures. Building on this description and the work of ...


The Admissibility Of Social Science Evidence In Criminal Cases, Hon. Donald E. Shelton Jul 2009

The Admissibility Of Social Science Evidence In Criminal Cases, Hon. Donald E. Shelton

Hon. Donald E. Shelton

The rapid development of emerging scientific methods, especially the increased understanding of deoxyribonucleic acid ("DNA"), has had, and will undoubtedly continue to have, an almost stunning impact on our justice system, particularly at the trial level. The forensic applications of these new scientific discoveries have been most dramatically seen in the criminal trial court. They have also caused us to re-examine other forms of forensic evidence that have been rather routinely admitted in our courts. Forensic evidence from social scientists is certainly one of those forms. Which of these forms of scientific forensic evidence have sufficient validity to be used ...


An Indirect-Effects Model Of Mediated Adjudication: The Csi Myth, The Tech Effect, And Metropolitan Jurors' Expectations For Scientific Evidence, Hon. Donald E. Shelton, Young S. Kim, Gregg Barak Jan 2009

An Indirect-Effects Model Of Mediated Adjudication: The Csi Myth, The Tech Effect, And Metropolitan Jurors' Expectations For Scientific Evidence, Hon. Donald E. Shelton, Young S. Kim, Gregg Barak

Hon. Donald E. Shelton

Part I of this article defines the "CSI effect", given that the phrase has come to have many different meanings ascribed to it. It emphasizes the epistemological importance of first describing the effect of the “CSI effect” as observed in juror behavior documented in a new study conducted in Wayne County (Detroit), Michigan, and then looking at causative factors that may be related to an explanation of those observed effects. Part II describes the methodology of the Wayne County study, provides a descriptive analysis of Wayne County jurors, and compares the jurors demographically to the Washtenaw County jurors who were ...


Twenty-First Century Forensic Science Challenges For Trial Judges In Criminal Cases: Where The "Polybutadiene" Meets The "Bitumen", Hon. Donald E. Shelton Jan 2009

Twenty-First Century Forensic Science Challenges For Trial Judges In Criminal Cases: Where The "Polybutadiene" Meets The "Bitumen", Hon. Donald E. Shelton

Hon. Donald E. Shelton

This artice discusses the challenges faced by trial judges in crimnal cases in fulfilling their Daubert "gatekeeping" role in the face of rapid advancements in forensic science. Admissibility questions for various forms of scientific evidence are reviewed, from DNA to fingerprints to social science "syndrome" evidence. The article discusses the pretrial issues presented by DNA databases, search issues and limitations problems as well as the impact of forensic science developments on juror expectations. Finally, forensic science issues regarding trial conduct are discussed, including voir dire, arguments and jury instructions,


The Leviathan's Choice: Capital Punishment In The Twenty-First Century, J. Michael Martinez, William D. Richardson, Brandon D. Hornsby Dec 2001

The Leviathan's Choice: Capital Punishment In The Twenty-First Century, J. Michael Martinez, William D. Richardson, Brandon D. Hornsby

J. Michael Martinez

The death penalty is one of the most contentious issues of our time and has generated an astonishing amount of arguments both for and against capital punishment. Out of this debate, Martinez, Richardson, and Hornsby have crafted the broadest and most balanced account to date. The Leviathan's Choice: Capital Punishment in the Twenty-First Century explores the death penalty from four distinct perspectives—philosophical, theological, social science, and legal—and includes scholarly essays on both sides of the debate. An ideal reader for students and policy makers, The Leviathan's Choice is essential for everyone following the arguments surrounding the ...