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Cold War

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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Is The East-West Political Bipolarity The Foundation Of The Ecumenical Movement? The Cold War As A Meta-Narrative Of The World Council Of Churches, Katharina Kunter Jun 2019

Is The East-West Political Bipolarity The Foundation Of The Ecumenical Movement? The Cold War As A Meta-Narrative Of The World Council Of Churches, Katharina Kunter

Occasional Papers on Religion in Eastern Europe

Excerpt: "...the following remarks provide an overview of the role of churches during the Cold War. Very often, the role of churches will be represented by developments and discussions within the WCC, which can be understood as a sort of role model, because it provided the "bell" for similar developments in the Western and Northern European countries. Three topics were prioritized. First was the dilemma of an ecumenism between the East and West in the early phase of the Cold War during the late 1940s and 1950s, which accompanied the founding of the World Council of Churches in 1948. Second ...


Murky Projects And Uneven Information Policies: A Case Study Of The Psychological Strategy Board And Cia, Susan Maret Feb 2018

Murky Projects And Uneven Information Policies: A Case Study Of The Psychological Strategy Board And Cia, Susan Maret

Secrecy and Society

This case study discusses the Truman and Eisenhower administration's (1951-1953) short-lived Psychological Strategy Board (PSB). Through the lens of declassified documents, the article recounts the history and activities of the Board, including its relationship with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and clandestine projects that involve human experimentation. Primary documents of the period suggest that institutional secrecy, coupled with inconsistent information policies, largely shielded CIA's BLUEBIRD, ARTICHOKE, and MKULTRA from the Board. This subject has not been previously reported in the research literature, and supplements existing historical understanding of the PSB's mission under the broad umbrella of psychological ...


Dividing Germany, Accepting An Invitation To Empire: The Life, Death, And Historical Significance Of George Kennan's "Program A", John Gleb Sep 2017

Dividing Germany, Accepting An Invitation To Empire: The Life, Death, And Historical Significance Of George Kennan's "Program A", John Gleb

Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union

This paper will attempt to reinterpret the early Cold War moment in Euro-American relations that gave rise to and ultimately destroyed George Kennan’s plan to reunify and neutralize Germany—the so-called “Program A” of 1948–49. Kennan envisioned his Program as the first and decisive step towards creating a “free European community” capable of acting as a non-aligned “third force,” thus ending the Cold War on the Continent. But before it could be presented to the United States’ European allies, Britain and France, some of the plan’s principal features were leaked to the New York Times. These features ...


U.S. Pakistan Relations During The Cold War, Lubna Sunawar, Tatiana Coutto Oct 2015

U.S. Pakistan Relations During The Cold War, Lubna Sunawar, Tatiana Coutto

The Journal of International Relations, Peace Studies, and Development

Since the end of British India’s colonial rule in 1947 and the subsequent partition of the South Asian subcontinent, Pakistan’s foreign policy has been driven largely by geopolitical and ideological concerns. Located at the crossroads of the Middle East and South Asia, and relatively close to the Soviet Union (USSR) and Europe, Pakistan emerged not only as a potential bridge between the oil-rich Persian Gulf, energy-hungry East Asia, and the West[1], but also as a channel to ‘the Muslim World’. Such potential, however, has never been fulfilled: unsettled territorial disputes with India, along with irreconcilable national identity ...


Teutonic Terror: The History Of German Counterterrorism Policy, Harry Richart Oct 2015

Teutonic Terror: The History Of German Counterterrorism Policy, Harry Richart

Ex-Patt Magazine

Terrorism wasn’t born in the 21st Century. Learn how Germany has dealt with domestic threats from the Cold War to the War on Terror.


Imagined Communities, Tangible Limits: Sendero Luminoso And The Incongruity Of Marxism And Nationalism, Dylan Maynard Sep 2015

Imagined Communities, Tangible Limits: Sendero Luminoso And The Incongruity Of Marxism And Nationalism, Dylan Maynard

International Social Science Review

Sendero Luminoso, or Shining Path, is considered to be one of the most violent insurgencies to originate in the Western Hemisphere. They caused destruction throughout Peru in order to incite a peasant uprising that would eventually engulf Lima, the capital, and introduce a “New Democracy.” Although the movement claimed to be based on an indigenous Peruvian identity, the presence of a Marxist framework creates a conflict with the nationalist sentiment. This paper examines the conflict between nationalist and Marxist ideologies in the context of the Shining Path insurgency in Peru. By examining the seminal work of Marx and Engels, along ...


The Cold War And Heated Divides: Religious Proliferation, Maxwell Bevilacqua Dec 2012

The Cold War And Heated Divides: Religious Proliferation, Maxwell Bevilacqua

The Undergraduate Journal of Social Studies

Whereas religion, in its most general sense, is typically understood to be a secondary, tertiary, or even a non-factor in the realm of international relations, this piece explores the potential primacy of it’s impact in the Cold War. Specifically, America’s fanatical and concerted efforts to rally the world against the fanaticism of communism underscore not only the universal appeal of ”spiritual forces”, but also the historical reframing of American soft power. Further, this piece investigates how we may have come to understood the Cold War as a battle of “good” against “evil” in pursuit of peace and yet ...


Nato Expansion During The Cold War And After, Evan Jaroff Mar 2012

Nato Expansion During The Cold War And After, Evan Jaroff

Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union

No abstract provided.


Divided Responsibility: Nato, The European Union, And European Defense After Cold War, Samuel Jubelirer Mar 2012

Divided Responsibility: Nato, The European Union, And European Defense After Cold War, Samuel Jubelirer

Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union

No abstract provided.


Terror And The Politics Of Containment: Analysing The Discourse Of The ‘War On Terror’ And Its Workings Of Power, Farish A. Noor Jan 2010

Terror And The Politics Of Containment: Analysing The Discourse Of The ‘War On Terror’ And Its Workings Of Power, Farish A. Noor

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Since 11 September 2001, the discourse of the ‘war on terror’ has become one of the most over-used and hegemonic discourses that has shaped domestic politics and international relations worldwide. This paper focuses on the workings of the discourse of ‘anti-terrorism’ and its linkages to power structures and the institutions that are supported by them. It will look at how the discourse of the ‘war on terror’ has been used by the governments of Southeast Asia and Western Europe in particular in relation to oppositional forces, both legal and extra-legal; and its wider implications on the development of democracy and ...


Security And International Relations By Edward A. Kolodziej (Cambridge, Uk: Cambridge University Press, 2005), Tyler Haupert Jan 2008

Security And International Relations By Edward A. Kolodziej (Cambridge, Uk: Cambridge University Press, 2005), Tyler Haupert

Global Tides

A book review of Security and International Relations by Edward A. Kolodziej (2005).


Worldview And Culture: Leadership In Sub-Sahara Africa, Betsie Smith Sep 2003

Worldview And Culture: Leadership In Sub-Sahara Africa, Betsie Smith

New England Journal of Public Policy

The traditional worldview and culture of Africa was very different from that of the West today: man was at the center of a religious universe; time was generally felt to be under the control of man, not the reverse; the belief that the dead are able to influence the living enhanced reverence for the elderly; a belief in collectivism was far stronger than a belief in individualism. Colonial- ism, the Cold War, and three decades following independence upset the traditional African worldview and created bewildering frictions within the political, economic, and social wellbeing of the continent. The role of African ...