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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Fake News: Agenda Setting And Gatekeeping In The Media, Chelsea Sydnor Jan 2018

Fake News: Agenda Setting And Gatekeeping In The Media, Chelsea Sydnor

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This piece will examine the ideas of agenda setting and gatekeeping theories, as well as how they affect modern media coverage. Agenda setting theory is the idea that the media sets the agenda by selecting the topics that it covers. Gatekeeping refers to the idea that too many events occur for the media to cover all of them, so it must therefore choose which ones to specifically cover. It will review multiple studies and events in which the theories have played a part in the outcome. Particularly, it will analyze how campaign coverage has been found to influence voters in ...


Changing Confidence In The News Media: Political Polarization On The Rise, Robert Reedy Jan 2018

Changing Confidence In The News Media: Political Polarization On The Rise, Robert Reedy

Undergraduate Honors Theses

A large number of Americans no longer have confidence in the news medias ability to report the news accurately. With ongoing anti-media rhetoric and presence of "fake news" in the political climate, Americans remain divided on the topic of the media, and believe the news media is biased in their coverage of President Trump's administration. Historically, a free and open press is vital for healthy democracies around the world, and is well protected under the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Negative views towards the press can have dire consequences with regards to the political scene. This research ...


A Character Study: Partisan Politics In The Age Of Twitter, James Bradbury Jan 2015

A Character Study: Partisan Politics In The Age Of Twitter, James Bradbury

Undergraduate Honors Theses

It’s no secret that the world is quickly shifting from the nightly news and the daily paper to a 24/7 rapid-response information environment driven by smartphones and other personal computing devices. Also readily apparent is the hyper-partisanship that has come to mire America’s legislative process. This paper will explore the connection between the two phenomena by reviewing a mix of academic and popular literature and conducting an original experiment to arrive at a better understanding of how Internet-mediated communication technologies drive political opinions at the individual level. Specifically, statistical analyses are performed to parse out the differences ...


Selectivity Of Television Media: The Effects Of Quasi-Social Networks On Voter Participation, Mykala Keuter Jan 2015

Selectivity Of Television Media: The Effects Of Quasi-Social Networks On Voter Participation, Mykala Keuter

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Television has changed the way average citizens receive information. It has made expressing opinions to a mass amount of people very quickly a possibility. Conventional wisdom suggests that most forms of television depress political participation. However, as the forms of media change and the types of shows change to function more as a social network than simply entertainment, then perhaps television has the capacity to persuade people and to make them more likely to participate. This can potentially change the way in which election seasons function and political parties spend their funds. The only way to get at this is ...


Berlin Re-Visited: Nikita Khrushchev's Influence In The American Pressroom, Daniel Naftel Jan 2015

Berlin Re-Visited: Nikita Khrushchev's Influence In The American Pressroom, Daniel Naftel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Existing research suggests that in most cases, foreign elites hold influence over the domestic media coverage of international crises only when they are considered to be hostile. This is unsurprising, as it is often their hostile rhetoric that drives the events of the crisis. Thus far, however, there has been no distinction made between the various types of rhetoric these hostile leaders engage in, or how different categories of statements might have different degrees of influence on domestic media coverage. For example, might these foreign leaders’ more benign public utterances, that do not change the status quo of a crisis ...