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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

How To "Sell" Engaged Politics: An Examination And Justification Of Individual-Level Benefits In Deliberative Democracy, Edmond David Hally Jan 2007

How To "Sell" Engaged Politics: An Examination And Justification Of Individual-Level Benefits In Deliberative Democracy, Edmond David Hally

Theses and Dissertations

Deliberative democratic theory proposes an active citizenry that becomes empowered by discussing and taking and active part in politics. There is a large gap between theory and practice in the deliberative democratic literature. Namely, while many scholars have theorized why deliberative democracy can be considered normatively desirable, fewer studies have measured whether the benefits gained from deliberation are plausible. Almost all of the major empirical studies in the literature involve either quasi-experimental designs or fieldwork. As such, it becomes difficult to tell whether or not deliberation does produce benefits for individuals, and if so, how durable these gains are.

This ...


Cheap Signals, Costly Consequences: How International Relations Affect Civil Conflict, Clayton Lynn Thyne Jan 2007

Cheap Signals, Costly Consequences: How International Relations Affect Civil Conflict, Clayton Lynn Thyne

Theses and Dissertations

Given the appalling consequences of civil wars, why are the competing actors within a state unable to come to a settlement to avoid the costs of conflict? How might external parties affect the likelihood that a civil war begins? How do their actions affect the duration and outcome of civil conflicts that are already underway? This project draws on three main approaches--bargaining theory, signaling theory, and rational expectations--to examine how external actors might affect the onset, duration and outcome of civil wars.

Signals from external actors are important because they represent a potential increase (or decrease) in fighting capabilities for ...