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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Commercial Satellite Imagery Comes Of Age, Ann Florini, Yahya Dehqanzada Aug 1999

Commercial Satellite Imagery Comes Of Age, Ann Florini, Yahya Dehqanzada

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

Since satellites started photographing Earth from space nearly four decades ago, their images have inspired excitement, introspection, and, often, fear. Like all information, satellite imagery is in itself neutral. But satellite imagery is a particularly powerful sort of information, revealing both comprehensive vistas and surprising details. Its benefits can be immense, but so can its costs.


The First Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Legislative Council Elections, James T. H. Tang Mar 1999

The First Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Legislative Council Elections, James T. H. Tang

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

The Legislative Council (Legco) Elections in Hong Kong on May 24, 1998, isthe first open multiparty electoral competition in the People's Republic of China(PRC). Since Chinese leaders have repeatedly rejected Western-style democracyor multiparty competition for China, the extent to which the Hong Kong experiencewould serve as a model for political developments on the mainland isclearly limited. Nonetheless, political changes in Hong Kong has to be seen aspart of China's experience following their reunion. Under the "one country, twosystems" formula, Hong Kong is given the freedom to conduct its own internalaffairs as a Special Administrative Region (SAR), but ...


No More Secrets?: Policy Implications Of Commercial Remote Sensing Satellites, Ann Florini, Yahya A. Dehqanzada Jan 1999

No More Secrets?: Policy Implications Of Commercial Remote Sensing Satellites, Ann Florini, Yahya A. Dehqanzada

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

Ever since the earliest satellites and astronauts started taking pictures of the Earth from space nearly four decades ago, those images have inspired excitement, introspection, and, often, fear. Like all information, satellite imagery is in itself neutral. But satellite imagery is a particularly powerful sort of information, showing both comprehensive vistas and surprising detail. Its benefits can be immense—but so can its costs. The same images that remind us that we all share a fragile planet also enable those who have the images to more accurately aim their weapons at adversaries near and far.