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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Ties That Bind: How Domestic Politics Influence Ties With Extraterritorial Courts—A Study Of The Jcpc, Harold Young Sep 2018

The Ties That Bind: How Domestic Politics Influence Ties With Extraterritorial Courts—A Study Of The Jcpc, Harold Young

International Social Science Review

During the last half century, extraterritorial courts and the number of acceding states have markedly increased. It is important to better understand the relationships between the extraterritorial court and the state. This paper posits that the governments of those states will seek a change or disengage from the extraterritorial court if they perceive a disconnection between themselves and the extraterritorial court. The perception of such a disconnection is influenced by changes in the political environment that make the state more sensitive to decisions that are unfavorable to it. To test this theory, this paper examines the Judicial Committee of the ...


China, Rebalance, And The “Silent War”, John Linantud Apr 2016

China, Rebalance, And The “Silent War”, John Linantud

International Social Science Review

Based on Victor Corpus' Silent War (1989), this paper re-introduces strategic analysis and political geography to the study of nationalist-leftist insurgencies in the Philippines. National geography and changes in the geopolitics of Southeast Asia have, and will continue, to create the strategic context for guerilla wars and the rival end games of Manila and insurgents. In 1898-99 and 1941-45, for example, the geopolitical center of gravity passed over Central Luzon and led to the regime changes desired by insurgents. Since 1945, the geopolitical center of gravity has bypassed Luzon, an external development which has provided a tremendous advantage to counterinsurgents ...


Putting Transitional Justice On Trial: Democracy And Human Rights In Post-Civil War Societies, Brian K. Frederking Sep 2015

Putting Transitional Justice On Trial: Democracy And Human Rights In Post-Civil War Societies, Brian K. Frederking

International Social Science Review

This paper empirically tests the influence of transitional justice mechanisms (TJMs) – particularly truth commissions and war crimes tribunals – on post-civil war societies. The transitional justice literature advocates the effectiveness of such mechanisms in bringing about the reconciliation necessary to facilitate democratization and respect for human rights. However, few cross-national empirical studies exist to evaluate these claims. This article compares current levels of human rights abuses and democratization in post-civil war countries that have used TJMs with post-civil war countries that have not. These results support the advocates of war crimes tribunals: countries that have used tribunals have higher levels of ...


The Wrong War: The Soviets And The Korean War, 1945-1953, Joel R. Campbell May 2014

The Wrong War: The Soviets And The Korean War, 1945-1953, Joel R. Campbell

International Social Science Review

For the Soviet Union, the Korean War was in many ways the wrong war, as it played a crucial, yet indirect, role in it. Whatever his motivations, which centered on a realist and pragmatic appraisal of both global and regional considerations, Stalin apparently gave tacit consent to, if not outright approval for, Kim II Sung's attack on South Korea. Like China, the USSR did not want U.S. forces on its border, and sought to maintain preeminent influence in North Korea. The war had begun when the North took aggressive action semi-independently of Moscow. Another Communist state, China, then ...