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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Optimism In Independence: The European Central Bank After The 2008 Global Financial Crisis, Melissa D. Dixon, Jamie E. Scalera Nov 2016

Optimism In Independence: The European Central Bank After The 2008 Global Financial Crisis, Melissa D. Dixon, Jamie E. Scalera

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

The effects of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis (GFC) on finance and monetary policy continue to be widespread. Now, policymakers are seeking to determine the best approach for managing and resolving the crisis; one such strategy has been to delegate more legitimacy to independent central banks. When will a political leader support or undermine the legitimacy of an independent central bank in the aftermath of an economic crisis? We argue that the central mechanism for determining a change in views of central bank legitimacy is the optimism of the political elites. Therefore, if a government is optimistic about its chances ...


Fidel Castro's Grand Strategy In The Cuban Revolution: 1959-1968, Nicholas V. Boline Jul 2015

Fidel Castro's Grand Strategy In The Cuban Revolution: 1959-1968, Nicholas V. Boline

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Grand strategy is the purposeful and coherent set of ideas about what a nation seeks to accomplish in both war and peacetime, and how it should go about doing so. In this paper, I analyze the grand strategy of Fidel Castro during the formative years of the Cuban Revolution (1959-1968), as he sought to carve out a place for Cuba at the vanguard of the International Communist Movement (ICM). Castro had four grand strategic aims: breaking Cuba’s historical ties with the United States, ensuring the stability of the Cuban Revolution domestically, maintaining Cuba’s ability to act independently of ...


Opinions On Gun Control: Evidence From An Experimental Web Survey, Mallory L. Treece Jul 2015

Opinions On Gun Control: Evidence From An Experimental Web Survey, Mallory L. Treece

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

While a sizable literature exists on framing, little research extends this to gun control. In this study I analyze how partisan framing influences support for gun control. Using an experimental web survey, individual level data shows that Democrats in particular respond more favorably when gun control is framed as sponsored by fellow Democrats. In contrast, controlling for partisanship, gun owners more negatively react to gun control framed as Democrat-sponsored. These findings suggest the extent of support for gun control and ways in which parties can frame the issue in their favor.


Unstable Roots: The Precarious Bond Between Latin America And The Environment, Will G. Mundhenke Aug 2014

Unstable Roots: The Precarious Bond Between Latin America And The Environment, Will G. Mundhenke

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This paper endeavors to identify and assess the most essential features of environmental degradation throughout Latin America. Specifically, it will discuss the aspects that create a proliferation of deforestation and destruction of the quality of Latin American coasts. The relationship between population, limited land and resources, weak institutions, and poverty lead to an intense economic battle in which economic necessity wages war against an ever-decreasing environmental quality. I will attempt to identify the factors that contribute to the destruction of forests and coasts, and what actions should be taken to develop policies within Latin American governments to promote the ever-elusive ...


Battle Of The Sexes: Why The United States Has Not Yet Ratified The Convention On The Elimination Of All Forms Of Discrimination Against Women (Cedaw)., Julia Schast Aug 2014

Battle Of The Sexes: Why The United States Has Not Yet Ratified The Convention On The Elimination Of All Forms Of Discrimination Against Women (Cedaw)., Julia Schast

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Developed from a larger research project examining why the United States Senate formally rejects multilateral treaties, this particular study examines a related branch of inquiry about which factors impact the treaty ratification process in the United States. Utilizing the method of structured, focused comparison, used by Alexander George, the project presents a case study of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) to observe why the Senate has failed to provide advice and consent to this multilateral treaty. As multilateral treaties become more common in today’s globalized world, it is important to understand ...


The Contextual Backdrop For Deficit Spending In American Political Thought, Erica Y. Barker Aug 2014

The Contextual Backdrop For Deficit Spending In American Political Thought, Erica Y. Barker

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This paper analyzes political theories about national debt, public credit, and deficit spending as expressed by thinkers from our nation’s founding fathers to our most recent leaders. I found that instrumental, early American thinkers such as Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison held theories and values that undoubtedly carried on into modern politics. Alexander Hamilton believed national debt to be a “blessing” for the United States and that it would help to ensure the nation’s economic stability. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison disputed Hamilton’s ideas about debt and deficit spending, arguing that it would cause unnecessary ...


Are There Cracks In The Democratic Peace?, James W. Farmer, Jamie E. Scalera Aug 2014

Are There Cracks In The Democratic Peace?, James W. Farmer, Jamie E. Scalera

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

The Democratic Peace Principle is both a well-documented and a heavily scrutinized element of International Relations theory. My research aims to further analyze the principle to determine more precise conditions under which conflict can arise between democratic states. More specifically, my research analyzes the amount of conflict between democratic states of differing military and economic capabilities in order to see if such dyads have different dynamics than dyads with comparable military and economic might. If there are differing degrees of the democratic peace based on factors such as military and economic strength, this could indicate where future wars between democratic ...