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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Crashing Waves: Policies And Opportunities In The Venezuelan Migration Crisis, Hannah Daniel Jan 2019

Crashing Waves: Policies And Opportunities In The Venezuelan Migration Crisis, Hannah Daniel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This research seeks to understand migration, by asking the question, what shapes migration patterns in a crisis? To answer this question, the Venezuelan Migration Crisis, a situation emerging in 2014 and continuing to cause large flows of migration throughout Latin America into 2018, is used as a case study. This research presents unique policies and opportunities in Peru and Colombia, showing that migrants and policymakers have a cyclical relationship, which dictates flows of migration. Finding that policy strongly influences the opportunities available in a country, migrants have preferences to move toward countries that have crafted emergency-specific responses. The level to ...


Another Pathway To Foreign Direct Investment: Diaspora Engagement Policies, Seungbin Park Jan 2018

Another Pathway To Foreign Direct Investment: Diaspora Engagement Policies, Seungbin Park

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

In the post-Washington consensus world, developing countries consider foreign direct investment (FDI) economically beneficial. Although these capital-scarce countries have competed for FDI to promote economic development, they have not attracted much FDI. Instead, FDI has been concentrated in certain countries. Recently, an increasing number of developing countries have employed various diaspora engagement policies (DEPs) for the promotion of FDI, yet these policies' impact on FDI is not well understood. Hence, in this dissertation, I examine the role of DEPs in promoting FDI. I propose three questions. First, do DEPs increase FDI into developing countries? Second, how do DEPs increase FDI ...


The Effects Of Political Framing: Who Is A “Refugee?”, Giulia Barnhisel Jan 2016

The Effects Of Political Framing: Who Is A “Refugee?”, Giulia Barnhisel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis is examining the question: what causes changes in the definition of the concept of “refugee” over time? The refugee is often considered a humanitarian concept that creates an exception to traditional, security-oriented forms of managing irregular migration. However, by analyzing the evolving definition of the refugee, this discourse analysis shows how it is a political concept in that it has no single, universally accepted definition and therefore, it can be politically manipulated. This is what W. B. Gallie identifies as an “essentially contested concept” – a concept that is internally complex and has a variety of contrasting definitions that ...


Drinking Water Provision In Rural China, Elise Pizzi Jan 2015

Drinking Water Provision In Rural China, Elise Pizzi

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Why do governments succeed in delivering services to some communities but not to others? To assess the factors that explain cross-community variation in public goods provision, I examine government spending on water infrastructure and drinking water outcomes in China. I find that connections from villagers to individuals and officials outside the village affect drinking water provision. Despite the lack of elections and associated need to cater to voter demands, the Chinese government spends more on water provision to the politically dominant ethnic group. I find that the dominant group is favored because officials rely on network connections for policy implementation ...


South Of The Border: Immigration Attitudes In Latin America, Duncan F. Lawrence Jan 2013

South Of The Border: Immigration Attitudes In Latin America, Duncan F. Lawrence

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This dissertation develops a greater understanding of immigration attitudes through four essays focused on an important migration hub, Latin America. Each essay either develops existing scholarship by providing highly specified empirical tests of important theoretical debates or utilizes an alternative framework to approach the analysis of immigration attitudes. The first essay (Chapter 2) addresses a long standing theoretical and empirical debate concerning the role of economic self-interest and education in shaping immigration attitudes. I demonstrate that concern over labor competition is not an important factor influencing immigration attitudes in Latin America and that education increases tolerance of foreigners. Chapter 3 ...