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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Developmental Fusion: Chinese Investment, Resource Nationalism, And The Distributive Politics Of Uranium Mining In Namibia, Meredith J. Deboom Jan 2018

Developmental Fusion: Chinese Investment, Resource Nationalism, And The Distributive Politics Of Uranium Mining In Namibia, Meredith J. Deboom

Geography Graduate Theses & Dissertations

China’s rising global influence has significant implications for the politics of natural resource extraction and development in sub-Saharan Africa. Focusing on the uranium industry, I analyze how China’s influence operates at global, national, and sub-national scales in relation to natural resource politics in the southern African country of Namibia. Specifically, I draw on multi-methods fieldwork to evaluate 1) how Namibians are engaging with Chinese investments in mining and 2) what implications these engagements have for the politics of mining and development, including natural resource ownership and the distribution of mining-associated benefits and costs. Contrary to portrayals of Africans ...


Faith, Physiography, And Fallacy: Understanding Stigmatization Towards Individuals With Hiv And Aids In Botswana, Arianna Rose Copito Jan 2018

Faith, Physiography, And Fallacy: Understanding Stigmatization Towards Individuals With Hiv And Aids In Botswana, Arianna Rose Copito

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper explores various possible answers to the question, “Why are some people in Botswana more tolerant of individuals with HIV/AIDS than others?” A disease that impacts a large percentage of people in Botswana, this research aims to focus on reasons why intolerance exists as a means to alleviate negative consequences on individuals suffering from HIV/AIDS. This study explores religiosity, urbanism, gender, age, and education in order to accomplish this. The results of the research through a multiple regression shows that an increase in both religiosity and urbanism are statistically significant when explaining higher levels of tolerance towards ...


Institutional And Personal Homophobia In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Post-Materialist Explanation, Andrew Ormsby Jan 2015

Institutional And Personal Homophobia In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Post-Materialist Explanation, Andrew Ormsby

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Sub-Saharan Africa is currently the most homophobic place in the world in terms of both state institutions and public opinions. Many scholars have blamed this on the former colonial powers of Africa who imposed homophobic policies on their landholdings. In order to explain variations in African homophobia, this study conceptualizes homophobia in two forms: institutional, using a measure of the homophobic actions of African states, and personal, using a composite score of multiple opinion surveys regarding homosexuality. Using linear regression models, this paper contends that Inglehhart’s post-materialist framework does a much better job of explaining variation in homophobia within ...