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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Making Deliberation Work: Testing Theories Of Deliberation, Christina Ladam Jan 2019

Making Deliberation Work: Testing Theories Of Deliberation, Christina Ladam

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

In this project, I address three questions concerning the design and implementation of deliberative institutions in the United States. First, how do institutional choices in recruitment affect the pool of willing participants? I argue that people will express greater interest in taking part in deliberation when it is presented in a nonpartisan manner. Using a series of online experiments, I demonstrate that invitations from nonpartisan conveners illicit interest from politically diverse groups. Second, what factors affect participants' behavior during deliberative sessions? A common critique of deliberative democracy is that it cannot overcome the well-documented biases in people's information processing ...


Issue Salience And Lawmaking: How Public Attention Drives Lawmaker Behavior, Joseph Colin Zamadics Jan 2019

Issue Salience And Lawmaking: How Public Attention Drives Lawmaker Behavior, Joseph Colin Zamadics

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This dissertation advances issue salience as a theoretical concept in lawmaking. Often, issue salience is used as a control or omitted from analyses that focus on other concepts in lawmaking such as public opinion, constituent demographics, and lawmaker characteristics. I argue that the field's theoretical understanding of lawmaking is incomplete without considering issue salience. In order to insert issue salience into current models of lawmaking, the concept must be better defined. I uncover various nuances in issue salience by parsing out differences in issues and the lawmaking entity that is the receiver of the signal. I do so by ...


Pacifying The Peacekeepers: How State Involvement In U.N. Peacekeeping Reduces Military Threats To Democracy, Timothy James Alexander Passmore Jan 2019

Pacifying The Peacekeepers: How State Involvement In U.N. Peacekeeping Reduces Military Threats To Democracy, Timothy James Alexander Passmore

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

What explains why countries undergoing transitions to democracy are major contributors of personnel to United Nations peacekeeping operations? In recent decades, the provision of such personnel has been adopted largely by weak or nascent democracies. In the same period, the world has witnessed a decline in military coup activity. I argue that new democracies use peacekeeping to reduce the threat posed by the military during the years of transition and thereby increase the likelihood of democratic consolidation. In the short term such governments can credibly commit to maintaining the military since peacekeeping offers a variety of private benefits, while its ...