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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Determinants Of Social Expenditures In The Middle East: Oil, Taxes And Electoral Fraud, Ceren Altincekic Jan 2012

The Determinants Of Social Expenditures In The Middle East: Oil, Taxes And Electoral Fraud, Ceren Altincekic

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The ongoing revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa represent a turning point in the political systems of these predominantly Muslim countries. This dissertation argues that the variation in the type of the social movements these populaces adopted is partly a function of their social policies. I contend that the relationship between resource abundance and government tax revenues is not as straightforward as posited by the rentier state theory. Instead, social expenditures are lower in resource-rich countries, and different types of taxes move in opposite ways. Together with the social expenditures argument, the findings on the taxes suggest that ...


An Honest Heart And A Knowing Head: A Study Of The Moral, Political, And Educational Thought Of Jean-Jacques Rousseau And Thomas Jefferson, Jason Robles Jan 2012

An Honest Heart And A Knowing Head: A Study Of The Moral, Political, And Educational Thought Of Jean-Jacques Rousseau And Thomas Jefferson, Jason Robles

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The picture of democracy we get from both Thomas Jefferson and Jean-Jacques Rousseau is one that is characterized by potentiality or possibility: the development of democracy and the cultivation of virtuous, republican citizens are processes of perpetual becoming, or perpetual improvement and progress towards an ideal form of freedom. My primary objective is to demonstrate an affinity in principle between the moral, political, and educational thought of Thomas Jefferson and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. While similarity is demonstrable, I do not claim that Jeffersonian republicanism and Rousseauian republicanism are merely ideological or theoretical carbon copies; each is, in fact, distinct in its ...


Coordinating Human Rights Compliance, Kate Tipton Martin Jan 2012

Coordinating Human Rights Compliance, Kate Tipton Martin

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

After the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, accusations have been leveled against the United States, and specifically the CIA, for rendering hundreds of people suspected by the US government of being terrorists (or of aiding and abetting terrorist organizations) to third-party states such as Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Uzbekistan. Critics have accused the CIA of rendering suspects to other countries in order to avoid US laws mandating due process and prohibiting torture, even though many of those countries have, like the US, signed or ratified the United Nations Convention Against Torture. This process is referred to as ``extraordinary rendition''. It ...


When The U.S. Supreme Court Is Not The Last Word: Dialogue Between State Supreme Courts And Its Role In State Constitutionalism, Mark W. Denniston Jan 2012

When The U.S. Supreme Court Is Not The Last Word: Dialogue Between State Supreme Courts And Its Role In State Constitutionalism, Mark W. Denniston

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

State supreme courts occasionally rely on the provisions of their own state constitutions to expand rights for their citizens beyond the protections that the U.S. Supreme Court has interpreted the U.S. Constitution to require. This practice is known as the New Judicial Federalism. State supreme courts have the prerogative to recognize more expansive rights under their state constitutions because the U.S. Constitution sets a floor and not a ceiling for the protection of individual rights. On the other hand, the U.S. Supreme Court has unmatched resources as well as unparalleled prestige, and most state supreme courts ...


Choosing To Lose: How Ex-Ante Expectations Determine Asymmetric Conflict Outcomes, Melanie W. Sisson Jan 2012

Choosing To Lose: How Ex-Ante Expectations Determine Asymmetric Conflict Outcomes, Melanie W. Sisson

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This dissertation develops a theory that is explicitly cognitive in nature to explain why and when strong states retrench from ongoing conflicts with weaker opponents. The theory's fundamental premise is that states take seriously not only what they are fighting for, but also who they are fighting against. Specifically, the theory proposes that prior to militarized engagements states evaluate their power, measured primarily in terms of the number, sophistication, skill, and resilience of military assets, in relation to that of a prospective opponent and, on this basis, establish an expectation of the losses it likely will incur in a ...


Contesting Philosophical Authority In The Belly Of El Monstruo: A Case Study In Nonideal Political Theory And Epistemic Democracy, David Eric Meens Jan 2012

Contesting Philosophical Authority In The Belly Of El Monstruo: A Case Study In Nonideal Political Theory And Epistemic Democracy, David Eric Meens

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

What is philosophical inquiry about, how does one do it, and what is it good for? This paper draws upon original empirical work and is, in part, an instance of what students of the social sciences, especially those engaged in qualitative approaches to research such as ethnography, will recognize as what Fred Erickson termed a “natural history of inquiry.” During the summers of 2009 and 2010, I spent about two months conducting research in collaboration with a small, independent community located in Itztapalapa, an impoverished neighborhood of Mexico City. I set out to test one possible conceptualization of a political ...