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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Globalizing Sympathy, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Apr 2004

Globalizing Sympathy, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

The paper addresses two features of global disaster broadcasting: 1) the scope of disaster coverage and 2) the method of disaster performance, the way that disasters are turned into tragedies. This process is at the heart of "globalizing sympathy" --emotional connection with a global audience. Global media slowly, subtly, and inexorably expand our sympathy beyond the small screen and our local lives into the larger world.


Leading With Blood In The Streets: Global Broadcasters, Protesters, And Democratic Leaders, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 2004

Leading With Blood In The Streets: Global Broadcasters, Protesters, And Democratic Leaders, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Protesters attempt to broaden conflict by taking advantage of the news media's principle"if it bleeds it leads". Democratic leaders turn that rule back on the protesters. If there is no blood there is no story. All the democratic politicians have to do is disappear. There is no blood. And the protest is silenced. Globalizing media broadcasters and protesters lead with blood in the streets. Globalizing political leaders, on the other hand, can not lead with blood in the streets. Globalizing communication and political actors thus perform the interactive logic of globalization, playing out the mutually reinforcing incentives of ...


The Rhetoric Of Global Leadership: Cooperating, Crusading, And Preparing For War, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 2004

The Rhetoric Of Global Leadership: Cooperating, Crusading, And Preparing For War, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Global telecommunications technology and practice offer the permissive conditions for global political leadership and political rhetoric. Global media provide a new platform, an expanded public domain for talk and action. The medium, as Marshall McLuhan famously said, is the message; but media do not fully determine their own use. The players on the global stage follow their own scripts. Media elites have their own concerns, choosing stories that they feel appropriate for their tasks. Issues like Iraq ebb and flow as a focus of news attention. Political actors seize the stage to a greater or lesser degree. Though their speaking ...