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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Crashing Waves: Policies And Opportunities In The Venezuelan Migration Crisis, Hannah Daniel Jan 2019

Crashing Waves: Policies And Opportunities In The Venezuelan Migration Crisis, Hannah Daniel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This research seeks to understand migration, by asking the question, what shapes migration patterns in a crisis? To answer this question, the Venezuelan Migration Crisis, a situation emerging in 2014 and continuing to cause large flows of migration throughout Latin America into 2018, is used as a case study. This research presents unique policies and opportunities in Peru and Colombia, showing that migrants and policymakers have a cyclical relationship, which dictates flows of migration. Finding that policy strongly influences the opportunities available in a country, migrants have preferences to move toward countries that have crafted emergency-specific responses. The level to ...


World Leaders A-Twitter: Communication Platforms And Agenda-Building During The 2018 Nato Summit, Katja Walton Jan 2019

World Leaders A-Twitter: Communication Platforms And Agenda-Building During The 2018 Nato Summit, Katja Walton

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Twitter is a thriving microblogging service with growing prominence in the political sphere. In this study, I examine the differences between Twitter communications and verbal communications by three heads of state and government in relation to the most recent NATO Summit in July 2018. Through a three-step analysis, including descriptive statistics, content and tone analysis, and comparative analysis, the study investigates Twitter’s influence on content and tone and its agenda-building capacity for face-to-face summits. After hand-coding over 2,000 tweets and 15 verbal communications, I find that Twitter does not support more negative content and tone among world leaders ...


One Belt, One Road: Explaining The Destination Of Chinese Foreign Direct Investment, Angela Peterson Jan 2019

One Belt, One Road: Explaining The Destination Of Chinese Foreign Direct Investment, Angela Peterson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

What explains foreign direct investment (FDI) from China? It has been assumed by many scholars that investment climate matters when selecting a location of FDI. Factors such a level of corruption, quality of government, and strength of political institutions, tend to attract more FDI. Despite this, China’s One Belt, One Road initiative (BRI) is pouring billions of dollars into some of the most politically unstable and corrupt countries in the world. The goal of this paper is to understand why China invests into these corrupt countries, while many other actors do not. I argue that China has the confidence ...


Xi Jinping And Confucianism: Legitimacy And A National Moral Identity, Makenna Zoglmann Jan 2019

Xi Jinping And Confucianism: Legitimacy And A National Moral Identity, Makenna Zoglmann

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Decades after the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) demonized Confucianism as a backwards philosophy, Confucianism has once again become popular in Chinese political culture and society. This paper investigates how the president of the People's Republic of China, Xi Jinping, is using Confucian rhetoric to legitimize himself and the CCP. The paper explores the Chinese people's search for a national moral identity, the resurgence of Confucianism, and finally examines the speech Xi gave on the 40th Anniversary of the Reforms and Opening-up.


Left Or Right?: The Competing Politics Of Europe’S Radical Party Families, Grady Mcginnis Jan 2019

Left Or Right?: The Competing Politics Of Europe’S Radical Party Families, Grady Mcginnis

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Both radical right and left parties are on the rise across Europe. Previous research has shown similarities between voters of radical parties. However, prior analyses have focused on voters of one radical party, while ignoring the other. In turn, differences between radical party voters are inferred rather than proven through qualitative evidence. In this study, I examine support for radical right and left parties across the same years and nine European countries, in order to understand why voters prone to radicalism support either the left or right. I find that while voters of both parties share commonalities, they differ in ...


Explaining Attitudes Towards The U.S. In Latin America, Lilith Gamer Jan 2019

Explaining Attitudes Towards The U.S. In Latin America, Lilith Gamer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Foreign policymakers have long since agonized over how citizens of foreign countries perceive the United States, and why. In the face of alleged American hegemonic decline, fears of so-called “anti-Americanism,” a term first popularized during the Cold War, have been rekindled by politicians, TV anchors, and students of international affairs alike. Does the world like Americans, how much or how little, and why? What determines mass attitudes towards the United States? While largely focused on Latin America in the ‘80s, research on the subject has since shifted to explaining hostility in the Middle East. This sea change has left contemporary ...


Party Politics In The Muslim World: The Nexus Between Institutionalization And Agency In The Development Of Islamist Parties, Khalifa Alqaz Jan 2019

Party Politics In The Muslim World: The Nexus Between Institutionalization And Agency In The Development Of Islamist Parties, Khalifa Alqaz

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Islamist parties are comparatively assessed across Muslim majority countries to determine the effects of structural conduciveness and effective agency on party performance. Using correlative studies with historical analyses, institutionalization is observed to establish the limits of party success while effective agency has been demonstrated to facilitate electoral success. These findings suggest that while institutionalization could structurally impede the development of Islamist parties, their ability to spatially compete in party politics were primarily determined by the party’s ability to maximize voter mobilization.


Welfare And Democratic Legitimacy: The Impact Of Need-Based Welfare On Women’S Political Engagement In Latin America And The United States, Suzannah Ranzo Jan 2019

Welfare And Democratic Legitimacy: The Impact Of Need-Based Welfare On Women’S Political Engagement In Latin America And The United States, Suzannah Ranzo

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Political engagement from a diverse populace is vital for the functioning of a legitimate democracy that proportionately represents the interests of the governed people. Impoverished women experience at least two forms of oppression due to their socioeconomic status and gender—and often other forms of oppression—which intersect to enhance their marginalization and exclusion from the political sphere. This research compares data from the United States and Latin America to discover if receiving welfare benefits from the government can mobilize or hinder low income women from engaging in politics. This research analyzes welfare’s impact on three forms of political ...


Why Does Variance Occur In The Composition Of The House Armed Services Committee Compared To Whole House?, Vincent Wroble Jan 2019

Why Does Variance Occur In The Composition Of The House Armed Services Committee Compared To Whole House?, Vincent Wroble

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Abstract: What factors cause legislators to be members of the House Armed Services Committee? This paper looks at factors that may impact membership on this committee. Factors examined include constituency characteristics as well as the legislators’ previous careers in the Armed Services. The results show that while constituency characteristics play the largest role in predicting membership on the House Armed Services Committee, veteran status, as well as differences in members’ military careers (including whether they served on active duty, and whether they served as an officer) were also significant in increasing the probability of membership. In addition, political party affiliation ...


Beyond “Good Behaviour”: A Plan To Restructure The Supreme Court Of The United States, Ross Mcnearney Jan 2019

Beyond “Good Behaviour”: A Plan To Restructure The Supreme Court Of The United States, Ross Mcnearney

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Supreme Court of the United States truly decides what the law is. It is the final say in any legal battle, and as a result, it is in many ways more powerful than either the legislative or executive branches of the United States government. It performs an important check on both of those branches and serves a vital function in the democracy of the United States. But its current structure leaves something to be desired. There are too few justices, and life tenure is a mistake. Plus those justices represent a very geographically narrow selection of the country’s ...


The Power Of Renewable Energy: A Comprehensive Analysis Of Renewable Portfolio Standards And Their Strengths, Liam Kelly Jan 2019

The Power Of Renewable Energy: A Comprehensive Analysis Of Renewable Portfolio Standards And Their Strengths, Liam Kelly

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The 2018 IPCC report is a sobering reality that the anthropogenic climate change will have vast effects on our world, the science is clear that emissions emitted by humans are responsible for the current climate crisis. In order to mitigate further damage governments must create policy that addresses human emissions which are leading to climate change.

As the U.S. federal government moves away from climate mitigation policy, including abandoning the Paris Agreement, the role of state-level policy tools such as the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) take on increasing importance. RPS are the regulations, which require utilities to increase the ...


Signaling Illiberalism: Democratic Backsliding. A Case Study Of Germany And Hungary., Emily Schweitzberger Jan 2019

Signaling Illiberalism: Democratic Backsliding. A Case Study Of Germany And Hungary., Emily Schweitzberger

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In the past decade, the decline, or backsliding, of democracy has reemerged as a concern in international affairs with many leaders overstepping constitutional restraints to accumulate power in their hands. While democratic backsliding occurs in various ways and in regions all over the world, Europe has struggled to control its spread as populist parties become closer and closer to taking power with each election cycle. In this paper, I examine the cases of Germany and Hungary, which share similar historical and cultural backgrounds yet differ in their democratic strengths: Germany remains a strong beacon of Western, liberal democracy, but Hungary ...


Gilded Realities: The Political Art Of Framing Immigrants, Rachel Ensign Jan 2019

Gilded Realities: The Political Art Of Framing Immigrants, Rachel Ensign

Undergraduate Honors Theses

As immigration in the United States (U.S.) becomes an increasingly polarizing topic, questions concerning the legal status of immigrants are often reduced to black and white answers: they are either legal or illegal. Policymakers specifically position immigrants as deserving members of society or as unwelcomed foreigners for political profit (Tirman, 2015). This research posits that the identity of policymakers explains why some policymakers frame immigrants differently than other policymakers. Policymakers have role identities, their identity based on the positions they assume in society, and group identities, their identity based on their demographic characteristics. This research specifically analyzes the effect ...


Tracking And Reflecting On Hate And Discrimination: A Meta-Analysis And Survey Experiment Depicting Perceptions Of Sikh Americans And The Sikh Faith In The United States, Serene Singh Jan 2019

Tracking And Reflecting On Hate And Discrimination: A Meta-Analysis And Survey Experiment Depicting Perceptions Of Sikh Americans And The Sikh Faith In The United States, Serene Singh

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Abstract: Sikhs have been largely ignored in the literature surrounding criminal justice and religious tolerance. The many pressures faced by this group, including hate crimes, present an urgent need for political scientists to understand the issues this community faces and further, to challenge those issues to ensure their well-being. This research examines both of these concepts through two separate analyses: a meta-analysis and a survey experiment. In the meta-analysis, the Sikh experience is contextualized by assessing trends in media coverage and representation of turbans in the United States. This section reports a meta-analysis of 81 published journals, articles, and studies ...


The Role Of Public Opinion: Judicial Decision Making On Gay Rights Cases, Andrew Wise Jan 2019

The Role Of Public Opinion: Judicial Decision Making On Gay Rights Cases, Andrew Wise

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In the United States, public opinion on gay rights has not always been favorable to gay Americans. Recently, this trend has been challenged and public opinion in support of gay rights has been growing. There is reason to believe that both the legislative and executive branches of government have responded to this increase accordingly, but what about the judicial branch? In this paper, I look at how public opinion on gay rights, specifically gay marriage, affects how individual state supreme court justices vote on gay rights cases, between the years 1981 and 2004. Additionally, I examine how the method of ...


What Unites The States? Examining Modernity And American Nationhood Through The Eyes Of The European New Right, Sara Canetto Jan 2019

What Unites The States? Examining Modernity And American Nationhood Through The Eyes Of The European New Right, Sara Canetto

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis uses the lens of the European New Right to analyze the development of American nationhood in the era of reinvigorated nationalism and identity politics. To do so, this project uses the 5 processes of modernity (individualization; rationalization; massification; desacralization; universalization) which the New Right describes as the systems that together threaten authentic community and meaning. By using the grounding texts of Against Democracy and Equality and Homo Americanus, this thesis analyzes the points of view of the New Right as well as their contribution to the appeal of nationalism and anti-liberalism.


Scandinavian Radicalism: The Politics Of Inequality And Right-Wing Voting, Jeffrey Nonnemacher Jan 2019

Scandinavian Radicalism: The Politics Of Inequality And Right-Wing Voting, Jeffrey Nonnemacher

Undergraduate Honors Theses

What conditions influence a voter’s decision to vote or support the radical right? In this paper, I argue that inequality plays an important role in boosting support for the radical right, but that the relationship is more complicated and depends on where a voter lives and under what conditions. I compile a cross-sectional dataset of Swedish municipalities and conduct an original survey experiment of Swedish citizens in order to determine how inequality impacts support for the radical right, how voters generate perceptions around the issue, and then how they use those perceptions in political decision making. I find that ...


The Role Of Dehumanization In Shaping Attitudes About Undocumented Immigrants, Cassidy Francies Jan 2019

The Role Of Dehumanization In Shaping Attitudes About Undocumented Immigrants, Cassidy Francies

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In the context of undocumented immigration, dehumanization and humanization have potential to provide insight to the long sought-after question of what impacts public attitudes toward undocumented immigrants. The current study assessed whether dehumanizing and humanizing images and rhetoric impact political tolerance, prejudice, perceived threat, and immigration policy preferences. I hypothesized that dehumanization would predict less political tolerance for undocumented immigrants, support for more restrictive immigration policy, and a more negative view of undocumented immigrants overall, while humanization would do the opposite. It is important to investigate the role of both humanizing and dehumanizing rhetoric on attitudes about immigration policy to ...


Understanding The Factors That Lead States To Adopt Anti-Hazing Laws, Rebecca Tyus Jan 2019

Understanding The Factors That Lead States To Adopt Anti-Hazing Laws, Rebecca Tyus

Undergraduate Honors Theses

What may cause a state to adopt an anti-hazing law or have a tougher anti-hazing law than other states? This paper looks at what factors may cause a state to have a tougher anti-hazing law. Such factors that were examined were political culture, and the number of hazing-related deaths prior to the law being passed. The results show that the number of hazing-related deaths is significant in determining if a state has a tougher anti-hazing law. In addition, the interaction between moralistic culture and hazing-related deaths was statistically significant. Factors that may cause a university to have a tougher anti-hazing ...


Timing Turnout: The Competing Electoral Schedules Of European Elections, Jeffrey Nonnemacher Jan 2019

Timing Turnout: The Competing Electoral Schedules Of European Elections, Jeffrey Nonnemacher

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Since direct elections to the European Parliament began in 1979, variations in voting behavior in European Parliament (EP) elections from national elections raise interesting questions about political behavior. Previous studies into European elections conclude that turnout is lower because EP elections are second order contests, meaning that they are seen as extensions of national politics and of low importance. However, as the EU has grown, some studies have found that European considerations do influence electoral outcomes in EP elections. In this study, I add to this growing literature on how Europe matter and I argue that EP elections are more ...


Liability, Responsibility, And Sexual Exploitation And Abuse: The Problematic Implications Of United Nations Discourse For Addressing Sexual Exploitation And Abuse By Un Personnel, Mallory C. Hale Jan 2019

Liability, Responsibility, And Sexual Exploitation And Abuse: The Problematic Implications Of United Nations Discourse For Addressing Sexual Exploitation And Abuse By Un Personnel, Mallory C. Hale

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this paper, I examine how the United Nations (UN) discourse regarding sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) by UN personnel constructs the problem of SEA and distances the UN from institutional liability and responsibility. The documents analyzed are from 2002 to 2018.

I make the argument that the UN discourse depicts SEA as being a problem of military personnel as opposed to civilian personnel. This attribution of the problem to military personnel is done through the deployment of racialized, gendered tropes regarding Global South masculinities. The use of tropes is made possible because military personnel are overwhelmingly men from the ...


Visceral, Teetering, And Imperfect - Three Generations Of Partisans; Three Generations Of Gay And Lesbian Americans, John Mcinerney Jan 2018

Visceral, Teetering, And Imperfect - Three Generations Of Partisans; Three Generations Of Gay And Lesbian Americans, John Mcinerney

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The two party system in United States politics belies the complexity and nuance of political identity. Understanding the partisan psychopolitical behavior of lesbian, gay, and bisexual U.S. citizens informs our collective understanding of the American political tradition. There is currently a scarcity of literature on the topic of LGB political partisanship. This thesis draws out the complex nature between human beings and their partisan behavior, or lack thereof. Data collected from 10 partisan LGB U.S. citizens in tandem with quantitative models drawn from General Social Survey variables suggest that an identity based model is the best predictor of ...


National Competent Authorities As The Reference Member State: Understanding The Variables Affecting Their Regulatory Decisions, Christian Martin Jan 2018

National Competent Authorities As The Reference Member State: Understanding The Variables Affecting Their Regulatory Decisions, Christian Martin

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The pharmaceutical medicines in one member state of the European Union do not belong in any other member state unless that member state’s national medicines agency has approved them. In this paper I look at the two procedures that exist, the mutual recognition procedure and the decentralized procedure. I ask what affects the variation in ease and stringency within the regulatory decisions of the national competent authorities when acting as the reference member state. I hypothesize that institutions and economic political ideology influence the regulatory decisions, leading to more or less finalized procedures. Multi-variate regressions confirm the permeability of ...


Representational Effects Of Campaign Spending In U.S. Congressional Primaries, Patrick Buhr Jan 2018

Representational Effects Of Campaign Spending In U.S. Congressional Primaries, Patrick Buhr

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The average member of Congress is increasingly wealthier than the average citizens they represent, despite evidence that voters disapprove of wealthy candidates. This paper advances a potential explanation: wealthy legislators have advantages during party primaries, thereby limiting the pool of viable candidates in a general election. By combining F.E.C. donor files from the 2006-2016 congressional elections with demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau, I find that congressional candidates come overwhelmingly from a district's wealthiest neighborhoods. Wealthy candidates are successful in congressional primaries primarily because of their fundraising advantage--which is driven by donors from their same ...


Faith, Physiography, And Fallacy: Understanding Stigmatization Towards Individuals With Hiv And Aids In Botswana, Arianna Rose Copito Jan 2018

Faith, Physiography, And Fallacy: Understanding Stigmatization Towards Individuals With Hiv And Aids In Botswana, Arianna Rose Copito

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper explores various possible answers to the question, “Why are some people in Botswana more tolerant of individuals with HIV/AIDS than others?” A disease that impacts a large percentage of people in Botswana, this research aims to focus on reasons why intolerance exists as a means to alleviate negative consequences on individuals suffering from HIV/AIDS. This study explores religiosity, urbanism, gender, age, and education in order to accomplish this. The results of the research through a multiple regression shows that an increase in both religiosity and urbanism are statistically significant when explaining higher levels of tolerance towards ...


The Impact Of Third-Generation Biofuels Versus Fossil Fuels On Interstate And Intrastate Conflicts, Ursula Grunwald Jan 2018

The Impact Of Third-Generation Biofuels Versus Fossil Fuels On Interstate And Intrastate Conflicts, Ursula Grunwald

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Oil is the most traded item in the world, and previous research has shown a link between oil and the intensity and duration of conflicts. However, work has not compared and contrasted the impact of oil on interstate versus intrastate conflict. Additionally, the world's fuel demands will increase in the coming decades. As a way to encourage more peaceful relations, the question was posed if third-generation biofuels could solve some of the problems of fuel demand and conflict over fossil fuel resources. The research found that oil serves as different motivation in interstate and intrastate conflict. In interstate conflict ...


Here Comes The Sun: Constraining Russian Aggression And Ambition In The Arctic Through The Analysis Of Structural Realism, Samantha Battey Jan 2018

Here Comes The Sun: Constraining Russian Aggression And Ambition In The Arctic Through The Analysis Of Structural Realism, Samantha Battey

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper is a broad case study attempting to reconcile how structural realism can use different liberal theories and concepts to accomplish realist ends. That being said, the current situation in the Arctic has real-world significance that draws equal importance with the theoretical implications of this thesis. As climate change is opening the Arctic to economic exploitation in the near future, this paper addresses the rising importance of the Arctic and the issue of how the U.S. and its allies should respond to Russian militarization of the Arctic while ensuring their own interests. By the utilization of structural realism ...


External Negotiations, Internal Credibility: Investment Treaties And Autocratic Decision Making, Frank Hannigan Jan 2018

External Negotiations, Internal Credibility: Investment Treaties And Autocratic Decision Making, Frank Hannigan

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis seeks to understand why some policymakers sign international agreements governing the rights of investors by looking at the effects of winning coalitions on state leaders. The two empirical sections of this thesis examine the mechanisms through which political institutions, and the policymakers within them, shape executive level policy toward bilateral investment treaties in autocratic states. I find that signing agreements with highly developed OECD states contributes to the credibility of policymakers within the regime, which ultimately incentivizes the signing of international agreements.


Where Is Your Rage?: Dimensions Of Anger And The Aids Coalition To Unleash Power, Emily Martin Jan 2018

Where Is Your Rage?: Dimensions Of Anger And The Aids Coalition To Unleash Power, Emily Martin

Undergraduate Honors Theses

A common narrative in American political discourse suggests that anger, no matter its cause, manifestation, or degree, is inherently dangerous and should have no role in the public sphere. This research challenges the idea that anger cannot—or should not—have a legitimate role in political action, using the direct-action anti-AIDS activism of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) as a case study. Drawing on interviews of former ACT UP members collected in the ACT UP Oral History Project, as well as more general analyses of anger in other social movements, this paper examines the multiple dimensions of ...


Changing Confidence In The News Media: Political Polarization On The Rise, Robert Reedy Jan 2018

Changing Confidence In The News Media: Political Polarization On The Rise, Robert Reedy

Undergraduate Honors Theses

A large number of Americans no longer have confidence in the news medias ability to report the news accurately. With ongoing anti-media rhetoric and presence of "fake news" in the political climate, Americans remain divided on the topic of the media, and believe the news media is biased in their coverage of President Trump's administration. Historically, a free and open press is vital for healthy democracies around the world, and is well protected under the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Negative views towards the press can have dire consequences with regards to the political scene. This research ...