Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

"Frack Off!" Strategic Framing In Colorado's Grassroots Challenge To Oil And Gas, Grant Stringer Jan 2017

"Frack Off!" Strategic Framing In Colorado's Grassroots Challenge To Oil And Gas, Grant Stringer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

With the arrival of the 2000s oil and gas boom in Colorado, a robust coalition of grassroots and professional organizations emerged as a challenge. However, this coalition is very diverse, and some fractures have emerged in the movement. This thesis studied the anti-fracking movement in Colorado through interviews with leaders (co-founders or committee members) of organizations that are involved in further regulating or banning oil and gas development in their communities. Specifically, I studied how this diverse group of organizations “frames,” or presents, the issue of fracking to the public, and what the role of geographic factors (political party affiliation ...


What Drives Public Support For The European Court Of Justice? An Evaluation Of Court Legitimacy, National Sovereignty, And Democracy In Europe, Dakota Hamko Jan 2017

What Drives Public Support For The European Court Of Justice? An Evaluation Of Court Legitimacy, National Sovereignty, And Democracy In Europe, Dakota Hamko

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The European Court of Justice as it stands today is is one of the most influential transnational judicial institutions. The court exercises an unusually expansive range of jurisdiction over the member states of the European Union, and has played a creative role in expanding its own competencies through the process of constitutionalization. The mechanisms through which the court embellishes its own abilities, especially its ability to supersede the law of its member states, is a point of concern when analyzing the court’s legitimacy and democratic deficit within the European Union. This study follows trends of public support for the ...


Gendered Citizenship And The Sectarian Public Sphere: Women And Civic Space In Lebanon, Ellysse V. Dick Jan 2016

Gendered Citizenship And The Sectarian Public Sphere: Women And Civic Space In Lebanon, Ellysse V. Dick

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Modern Lebanon’s political sectarian system is the result of many years of external forces molding the territory and its sociopolitical structures to align with international interests. Civic spaces in Lebanon, and women’s activity within these spaces, is dictated by sectarian dynamics within its politics and society. This paper explores the evolution of the Lebanese state and sectarianized experiences of citizenship in relation to the external forces that shaped the “Lebanese System” in place today.

Beginning in the late Ottoman and French Mandate periods, it identifies the key players in state formation both under colonial rule and later, as ...


The Role Of Civil Society In The Tunisian Democratic Transition, Veronica Baker Jan 2015

The Role Of Civil Society In The Tunisian Democratic Transition, Veronica Baker

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper explores the effects of civil society’s involvement in the Tunisian democratic transition through a case study on its contributions to the constitution drafting process. Tunisia gained widespread international attention following its popular uprising against authoritarian leader Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and successful transition to democracy. Many, however, have dismissed Tunisia’s triumph as a lucky break aided by the country’s small size, religious and ethnic homogeneity, pre-existing liberal social values, and “relatively moderate” Islamist party. Those focused on such “Tunisian exceptionalism” conclude that the country’s transition has little to teach other countries in political flux ...


Institutional And Personal Homophobia In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Post-Materialist Explanation, Andrew Ormsby Jan 2015

Institutional And Personal Homophobia In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Post-Materialist Explanation, Andrew Ormsby

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Sub-Saharan Africa is currently the most homophobic place in the world in terms of both state institutions and public opinions. Many scholars have blamed this on the former colonial powers of Africa who imposed homophobic policies on their landholdings. In order to explain variations in African homophobia, this study conceptualizes homophobia in two forms: institutional, using a measure of the homophobic actions of African states, and personal, using a composite score of multiple opinion surveys regarding homosexuality. Using linear regression models, this paper contends that Inglehhart’s post-materialist framework does a much better job of explaining variation in homophobia within ...


Seats At The Table: Civil Society And Participatory Governance In Brazilian Housing Policy, Maureen Mary Donaghy Jan 2011

Seats At The Table: Civil Society And Participatory Governance In Brazilian Housing Policy, Maureen Mary Donaghy

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Can democratic institutions be created to address social challenges? Democratic institutions should promote accountability of government officials to the needs of citizens. Civil society then plays a role in exposing corruption as well as in communicating the needs of low-income residents to officials. Neither the institutions of representative democracy nor the presence of civil society, however, appears to automatically guarantee adoption of social benefits for the poor. Scholars, development practitioners, donors, and activists propose participatory governance institutions as mechanisms to create accountability and responsiveness through a public forum incorporating civil society. To date, however, little comparative research exists to confirm ...


Three Essays In Political Economy, David Pinto Quintero Jan 2010

Three Essays In Political Economy, David Pinto Quintero

Economics Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Chapter 1. The Effects of Political Competition on the Feasibility of Economic Reform

This chapter shows that democracies may fail to enact desirable economic reforms even when such reforms Pareto dominate the status quo and there are no informational asymmetries. The key insight is that, even when reforms entail economic gains for all agents, electoral political losses cannot be compensated politically. Consequently, when the majority party has strong electoral support, minority parties pursue both low-gain reforms and high-gain reforms. Intermediate-gain reforms are harder to enact, since the electoral costs dominate welfare gains. In highly contested environments, only high-gain reforms succeed ...