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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Crashing Waves: Policies And Opportunities In The Venezuelan Migration Crisis, Hannah Daniel Jan 2019

Crashing Waves: Policies And Opportunities In The Venezuelan Migration Crisis, Hannah Daniel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This research seeks to understand migration, by asking the question, what shapes migration patterns in a crisis? To answer this question, the Venezuelan Migration Crisis, a situation emerging in 2014 and continuing to cause large flows of migration throughout Latin America into 2018, is used as a case study. This research presents unique policies and opportunities in Peru and Colombia, showing that migrants and policymakers have a cyclical relationship, which dictates flows of migration. Finding that policy strongly influences the opportunities available in a country, migrants have preferences to move toward countries that have crafted emergency-specific responses. The level to ...


Beyond “Good Behaviour”: A Plan To Restructure The Supreme Court Of The United States, Ross Mcnearney Jan 2019

Beyond “Good Behaviour”: A Plan To Restructure The Supreme Court Of The United States, Ross Mcnearney

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Supreme Court of the United States truly decides what the law is. It is the final say in any legal battle, and as a result, it is in many ways more powerful than either the legislative or executive branches of the United States government. It performs an important check on both of those branches and serves a vital function in the democracy of the United States. But its current structure leaves something to be desired. There are too few justices, and life tenure is a mistake. Plus those justices represent a very geographically narrow selection of the country’s ...


Tracking And Reflecting On Hate And Discrimination: A Meta-Analysis And Survey Experiment Depicting Perceptions Of Sikh Americans And The Sikh Faith In The United States, Serene Singh Jan 2019

Tracking And Reflecting On Hate And Discrimination: A Meta-Analysis And Survey Experiment Depicting Perceptions Of Sikh Americans And The Sikh Faith In The United States, Serene Singh

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Abstract: Sikhs have been largely ignored in the literature surrounding criminal justice and religious tolerance. The many pressures faced by this group, including hate crimes, present an urgent need for political scientists to understand the issues this community faces and further, to challenge those issues to ensure their well-being. This research examines both of these concepts through two separate analyses: a meta-analysis and a survey experiment. In the meta-analysis, the Sikh experience is contextualized by assessing trends in media coverage and representation of turbans in the United States. This section reports a meta-analysis of 81 published journals, articles, and studies ...


Reflexive Control And Disinformation In Putin's Wars, Francis King Jan 2018

Reflexive Control And Disinformation In Putin's Wars, Francis King

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The use of reflexive control (RC) and disinformation in the Russian conduct of kinetic and non-kinetic warfare is evident in conflicts from the Second Chechen War to Russian meddling in the U.S. 2016 presidential election. The original Soviet theory of RC has been refined and expanded into new dimensions of warfare including the concepts of information warfare and cyberwarfare, thus becoming a major weapon of the Russian military in its influence campaigns against the West. The technique of feeding disinformation or selecting the information an opponent receives in order to influence his voluntary decisions has been exploited by Russia ...


Here Comes The Sun: Constraining Russian Aggression And Ambition In The Arctic Through The Analysis Of Structural Realism, Samantha Battey Jan 2018

Here Comes The Sun: Constraining Russian Aggression And Ambition In The Arctic Through The Analysis Of Structural Realism, Samantha Battey

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper is a broad case study attempting to reconcile how structural realism can use different liberal theories and concepts to accomplish realist ends. That being said, the current situation in the Arctic has real-world significance that draws equal importance with the theoretical implications of this thesis. As climate change is opening the Arctic to economic exploitation in the near future, this paper addresses the rising importance of the Arctic and the issue of how the U.S. and its allies should respond to Russian militarization of the Arctic while ensuring their own interests. By the utilization of structural realism ...


External Negotiations, Internal Credibility: Investment Treaties And Autocratic Decision Making, Frank Hannigan Jan 2018

External Negotiations, Internal Credibility: Investment Treaties And Autocratic Decision Making, Frank Hannigan

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis seeks to understand why some policymakers sign international agreements governing the rights of investors by looking at the effects of winning coalitions on state leaders. The two empirical sections of this thesis examine the mechanisms through which political institutions, and the policymakers within them, shape executive level policy toward bilateral investment treaties in autocratic states. I find that signing agreements with highly developed OECD states contributes to the credibility of policymakers within the regime, which ultimately incentivizes the signing of international agreements.


Here Comes The Sun: Constraining Russian Aggression And Ambition In The Arctic Through The Analysis Of Structural Realism, Samantha B. Battey Jan 2018

Here Comes The Sun: Constraining Russian Aggression And Ambition In The Arctic Through The Analysis Of Structural Realism, Samantha B. Battey

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper is a broad case study attempting to reconcile how structural realism can use different liberal theories and concepts to accomplish realist ends. That being said, the current situation in the Arctic has real-world significance that draws equal importance with the theoretical implications of this thesis. As climate change is opening the Arctic to economic exploitation in the near future, this paper addresses the rising importance of the Arctic and the issue of how the U.S. and its allies should respond to Russian militarization of the Arctic while ensuring their own interests. By the utilization of structural realism ...


Giving Up On The Supreme Court: The Role Of Political Grievance And Betrayal, Lauren Strauss Jan 2017

Giving Up On The Supreme Court: The Role Of Political Grievance And Betrayal, Lauren Strauss

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Miller-Citrin debate, inspired by the widespread distrust of the U.S. government in the early 1970s, has tended to focus on whether trust has implications for alienation from the system or whether people simply distrust incumbents. My theory is that distrust alone is not a measure of alienation because this measure does not distinguish between people who have become alienated and those that are merely superficially distrustful. Using diffuse support for the U.S. Supreme Court as the dependent variable, I have used original data from Mechanical Turk to do a pilot study on the role of political betrayal ...


Preserving The Integrity Of Courts: Can State Courts Influence Public Knowledge And Perceptions Of The Judicial Branch?, Corey Michael Barwick Jan 2016

Preserving The Integrity Of Courts: Can State Courts Influence Public Knowledge And Perceptions Of The Judicial Branch?, Corey Michael Barwick

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Although the total number of incoming cases at the federal-level in 2013 was over 350,000, the total number of incoming cases at the state-level hovered between 90 and 100 million. To say that state courts are important to the American political system is an understatement. They determine, to paraphrase former Justice William Brennan, whether the United States truly lives up to the ideal of equal justice for all. It is therefore surprising that very little research has examined what people know or how people feel about these institutions. In this dissertation, I attempt to uncover the extent of the ...


A United State Of Injustice, Alexa L. Wach Jan 2016

A United State Of Injustice, Alexa L. Wach

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Abstract: There are actions carried out by government under the guise of political authority that are immoral and unjust. I hope to show that the fact that government is the entity carrying out the morally questionable action is not sufficient to satisfy conditions that make prima facie wrong actions morally permissible. I will explore some political theories that attempt to explain why government has political authority, then challenge those theories. In an attempt to make clear why political authority is unjustified, I provide an argument in the form of a variety of extreme examples in which political authority might be ...


Colorado Farmer's Influence On Flexible Water Policy Decisions: A Uniform Political Bloc?, Tyreen L. Livingston Jan 2015

Colorado Farmer's Influence On Flexible Water Policy Decisions: A Uniform Political Bloc?, Tyreen L. Livingston

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Water in the western United States is a controversial topic because of the decreased supplies due to urban and population growth, climatic changes such as drought, and continued disagreements about how existing water supplies should be allocated. The agricultural community in Colorado uses approximately 85% of the existing water supplies and a majority of Colorado’s water is located on the Western Slope. The Eastern Plains and Front Range areas are projected to see the majority of the population and development growth over the next thirty years and water supplies will continue to dwindle as more users demand more water ...


Following In The Squatter’S Footsteps: An Illegal Immigrant’S Path To Citizenship, Hannah Christine Fowler Jan 2013

Following In The Squatter’S Footsteps: An Illegal Immigrant’S Path To Citizenship, Hannah Christine Fowler

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

With an argument by analogy, I propose a framework of ‘adverse occupation’ as both a compromise to the proponents of the affiliation view and the autonomy view as well as an applicable solution within non-ideal theory. The components of this framework should be able to account for previous concerns addressed by these proponents by advancing a method of acquisition of certain rights by occupying a county under certain conditions. ‘Adverse occupation’ has five elements that must be established: the occupation must be (1) open, (2) continuous for the statutory period, (3) exhibiting the breadth of an established, contributing lifestyle, (4 ...


Coordinating Human Rights Compliance, Kate Tipton Martin Jan 2012

Coordinating Human Rights Compliance, Kate Tipton Martin

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

After the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, accusations have been leveled against the United States, and specifically the CIA, for rendering hundreds of people suspected by the US government of being terrorists (or of aiding and abetting terrorist organizations) to third-party states such as Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Uzbekistan. Critics have accused the CIA of rendering suspects to other countries in order to avoid US laws mandating due process and prohibiting torture, even though many of those countries have, like the US, signed or ratified the United Nations Convention Against Torture. This process is referred to as ``extraordinary rendition''. It ...


When The U.S. Supreme Court Is Not The Last Word: Dialogue Between State Supreme Courts And Its Role In State Constitutionalism, Mark W. Denniston Jan 2012

When The U.S. Supreme Court Is Not The Last Word: Dialogue Between State Supreme Courts And Its Role In State Constitutionalism, Mark W. Denniston

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

State supreme courts occasionally rely on the provisions of their own state constitutions to expand rights for their citizens beyond the protections that the U.S. Supreme Court has interpreted the U.S. Constitution to require. This practice is known as the New Judicial Federalism. State supreme courts have the prerogative to recognize more expansive rights under their state constitutions because the U.S. Constitution sets a floor and not a ceiling for the protection of individual rights. On the other hand, the U.S. Supreme Court has unmatched resources as well as unparalleled prestige, and most state supreme courts ...


Treaty Content And Costs: Explaining State Commitment To The International Criminal Court, Yvonne Marie Dutton Jan 2011

Treaty Content And Costs: Explaining State Commitment To The International Criminal Court, Yvonne Marie Dutton

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The International Criminal Court is the first permanent, treaty-based international criminal court established to help end impunity for perpetrators of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. More than 100 countries have ratified the treaty creating the court. By doing so, they have agreed to cede to an independent prosecutor the power to prosecute the state's own nationals for mass atrocities when the prosecutor and the ICC court determine the state is unwilling or unable to do so domestically. But, why have states committed to an institution like the ICC which has serious enforcement mechanisms to punish noncompliant behavior ...