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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Show Me The Money!, Singapore Management University Jan 2013

Show Me The Money!, Singapore Management University

Perspectives@SMU

Governments worldwide are accumulating reserves to guard against financial turmoil. Could they be contributing to it?


From Boardroom To Parliament, Singapore Management University Apr 2012

From Boardroom To Parliament, Singapore Management University

Perspectives@SMU

Everyone has different motivations for working, . But the primary incentive for slogging it out in the corporate jungle would be money— at least that is what employers believe. This helps explain why companies are often willing to shell out wads of cash to outbid one another in the labour market for top executives.


The Promise Of Social Impact Bonds, John Loder Jan 2011

The Promise Of Social Impact Bonds, John Loder

Social Space

A financial tool from Wall Street is being adapted in the social market to nurture early interventions and incentivise capital flow. As John Loder reports, social impact bonds promise two fundamental shifts—for governments to overcome the politics of fear and for private investors to fund social causes with impact.


Business And Global Governance: The Growing Role Of Corporate Codes Of Conduct, Ann Florini Mar 2003

Business And Global Governance: The Growing Role Of Corporate Codes Of Conduct, Ann Florini

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

These are, in many ways, halcyon days for global business. In a vast ideological shift in the late 20th century, markets rather than governments came to be seen as the road to prosperity. Governments that once nationalized foreign firms now seek out the investment, technology, and managerial expertise such companies can bring. The halls of the United Nations used to ring with calls for international regulation of those dreaded evil-doers, the multinational corporations. Now the UN instead implores business to join with it in a voluntary Global Compact to ensure respect for internationally agreed environmental, labor, and human rights standards.