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Public Deliberation

Deliberation

Comparative Politics

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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Habermas With A Whiff Of Tear Gas: Nonviolent Campaigns And Deliberation In An Era Of Authoritarianism, Peter Levine Dec 2018

Habermas With A Whiff Of Tear Gas: Nonviolent Campaigns And Deliberation In An Era Of Authoritarianism, Peter Levine

Journal of Public Deliberation

Authoritarianism is gaining around the world. Statistics show that deliberation shrinks when authoritarianism grows. In the face of authoritarian repression, directly promoting and organizing deliberation is likely to fail. However, Erica Chenoweth and Maria J. Stephan (2011) find that nonviolent campaigns have a strong record of success against authoritarian states. Although nonviolent campaigns are not themselves deliberative or aimed at building deliberative democracy, I argue that some of the reasons that make them successful also stand to benefit public deliberation. Thus the most promising strategy for expanding deliberation in an increasingly authoritarian world is to support nonviolent campaigns and to ...


Deliberation For Reconciliation In Divided Societies, Magdalena Dembinska Dr., Françoise Montambeault Dr. May 2015

Deliberation For Reconciliation In Divided Societies, Magdalena Dembinska Dr., Françoise Montambeault Dr.

Journal of Public Deliberation

Engaging with the literature on deliberative democracy, this article contends that in the context of ethnic group hostilities, deliberative processes where participants have a genuine opportunity to communicate and ‘hear the other side’ can be a way for inter-group dialogue and reconciliation. Separating the deliberative process into three distinct moments, it offers a framework for understanding how unequal and conflicting parties may be brought together to deliberate, how to grasp the micro-politics of deliberation, and to understand the diffusion mechanisms that bring society back in. The approach we propose aims to bridge the normative-macro and the experimental-micro accounts of deliberation ...


Where Are The Boundaries Of Deliberation And Participation? A Transatlantic Debate, Pau Alarcón, Joan Font Dec 2014

Where Are The Boundaries Of Deliberation And Participation? A Transatlantic Debate, Pau Alarcón, Joan Font

Journal of Public Deliberation

This article uses recent empirical results from a comparative Southern European study to show that the participatory practices commonly developed in this area are quite different from some of the common ideas related to deliberation in the English-speaking world. One of the main differences lies in the characteristics of the promoters, since most of them are top-down experiences organized by public authorities. The other main difference lies in the role played by equality concerns, which are quite marginal in most of these processes. In other aspects, like the role of participation professionals or the existence of important inequalities in the ...


On The Westerness Of Deliberation Research, Seong-Jae Min Dec 2014

On The Westerness Of Deliberation Research, Seong-Jae Min

Journal of Public Deliberation

This essay suggests that the issue of culture is vital to advance deliberation theories and practices. After discussing whether deliberative democracy is a Western-specific or universal concept, it argues that current deliberation research is heavily immersed in Western cultural and methodological standards. An empirical portion also suggests that the positive effects of deliberation were greater for Western participants as opposed to non-Western participants. It argues that deliberation theories and research should be expanded so that they can include more cultural sensibilities.


Transformative Deliberations: Participatory Budgeting In The United States, Hollie Russon Gilman Dec 2012

Transformative Deliberations: Participatory Budgeting In The United States, Hollie Russon Gilman

Journal of Public Deliberation

This article develops two conceptual models, based on empirical data, for assessing deliberation and decision making within United States adoptions of Participatory Budgeting (PB). The first model is results oriented whereas the second model is process oriented. The two models evince the tension between inclusiveness and efficiency that emerge as U.S. PB tries accommodating the dual goals of improved short-term service delivery and democratic deepening. Each model satisfies one of these deliberate goals better. Results oriented deliberation is more effective at producing viable projects whereas process oriented is better at ensuring that all participants’ voices are heard. Variation suggests ...