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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

States' Rights Apogee, 1760-1840, Ryan Setliff Oct 2012

States' Rights Apogee, 1760-1840, Ryan Setliff

Masters Theses

America's states' rights tradition has held much influence since the ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1788. In late 1798, in response to the Federalist administration's adoption of the Alien and Sedition Acts, the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions were formally adopted by the legislatures of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. These resolutions set a lasting precedent for state interposition and nullification. As well concurrence with these doctrines can be found in the Virginia Resolves of 1790, the constitutional debates of 1787-1790, and all throughout the colonial-revolutionary period of the 1760s to 1780s. In time, the Virginia and Kentucky ...


Our Covenant Constitution: The Covenantal Nature Of The United States Constitution, William T. Crabtree Apr 2012

Our Covenant Constitution: The Covenantal Nature Of The United States Constitution, William T. Crabtree

Senior Honors Theses

The problem with the national government and politics in the United States today is that citizens and politicians have both forgotten, ignored, and undermined the nature and significance of the U.S. Constitution as a civil covenant based on civil and religious liberty and limited government. This thesis proposes to analyze the nature of the Constitution as a civil covenant and how a proper interpretation and application of it as such can solve many of today’s most pressing political problems. It will discuss the nature and history of civil covenants, examine the mechanics of the Constitution in the creation ...


The Electoral College: Federalism And The Election Of The American President, Edwin C. Kisiel Iii Apr 2008

The Electoral College: Federalism And The Election Of The American President, Edwin C. Kisiel Iii

Senior Honors Theses

The system of the Electoral College for presidential elections should remain intact and not be replaced by national popular election. Looking back at the discourse during the ratification of the Constitution, the Framers of the Constitution chose to devise the Electoral College to ensure the president would be truly a statesman, not a politician. Additionally, the Framers recognized that the “one person, one vote” system of popular election would not be sufficient to elect the president. Furthermore, since the President is an officer of the states, the Framers created a federal electoral system whereby small states have disproportionate representation in ...