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Claremont Colleges

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Revolution in Military Affairs

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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Epochal Change: War Over Social And Political Organization, Robert J. Bunker Jan 1997

Epochal Change: War Over Social And Political Organization, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

The United States has been less affected by this process than most other Western nation-states; we seem to prosper despite such challenges. However, the breakdown of the family, increased drug use among our children, the growing specter of gang violence, and other forms of social terrorism suggest that our own institutions are not immune to a degree of chaos. Ralph Peters, in an earlier Parameters article, stated succinctly that we are witnessing "a struggle to redefine human meaning."[3] Regardless of the state of the revolution to which he referred, the struggle he describes is far from ended. If the ...


The Tofflerian Paradox, Robert J. Bunker Jan 1995

The Tofflerian Paradox, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Given the issue's importance—the Army's future as an effective 21st-century warfighting institution—Tofflerian theory attributes that are conceptually flawed should be forcefully acknowledged. With this perspective in mind, I posit that the war forms developed in War and Anti-War, specifically First and Second Wave war, are overgeneralized and distort Western warfare's historical development. As such, the war forms do not significantly further RMA theory and potentially pose a great liability. Still, these terms are becoming accepted by Army scholars because of the Tofflers' great theoretical influence.


The Transition To Fourth Epoch War, Robert J. Bunker Jan 1994

The Transition To Fourth Epoch War, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Based upon the influence that energy sources have exerted on the evolution of warfare over the broad expense of history, this author identifies eight basic trends that he believes will characterize "the changing face of war" through the early 21st century.