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Claremont Colleges

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Generations

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

A Crucible Of Conflict: Third Generation Gang Studies Revisited, John P. Sullivan, Robert J. Bunker Jan 2012

A Crucible Of Conflict: Third Generation Gang Studies Revisited, John P. Sullivan, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

This essay briefly recounts the evolution of the gangs that occupy failed communities and states, further discusses and updates the model of third generation street gangs discussed in an earlier Journal of Gang Research article—typically described simply as third generation gangs (3 GEN Gangs), and suggests strategies for coping with and mitigating this evolved form of gang violence. Of note is the lack of impact 3 GEN Gangs studies have had on domestically focused U.S. academic gang research while, at the same time, becoming a dominant model in use by defense analysis and scholars focusing on increasingly politicized ...


Third Generation Gang Studies: An Introduction, John P. Sullivan, Robert J. Bunker Jan 2007

Third Generation Gang Studies: An Introduction, John P. Sullivan, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

This paper reviews the literature and research related to third generation street gangs. Widely known as third generation gangs (3 GEN Gangs), these complex gangs operation with broad reach—often across borders—and have mercenary and at times political and potentially terrorist objectives. These are frequently identified as transnational gangs, known as Maras, and occupy the 3 GEN niche. The typology of the three generations of gang revolution, based on the interaction of three factors: politicization, internationalism, and sophistication found in the literature is also described. Finally, future research and security concerns are identified.


Generations, Waves, And Epochs: Modes Of Warfare And The Rpma, Robert J. Bunker Jan 1996

Generations, Waves, And Epochs: Modes Of Warfare And The Rpma, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

Tofflerian concepts, which have gained so much credence with the Army, are now beginning to openly influence Air Force dialogue on information-based future wars.


Ricochets And Replies: Rpma Update, Robert J. Bunker Jan 1996

Ricochets And Replies: Rpma Update, Robert J. Bunker

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

My article "Generations, Waves, and Epochs: Modes of Warfare and the RPMA" (Spring 1996)—which I wrote in the summer of 1995—made reference to two lesser-known theories of future warfare not debated at the time in the military journals. However, these two theories have now begun to actively influence military thinking. In order further facilitate the emerging revolution in political and military affairs (RPMA) debate within the Air Force, I'm including a synopsis and analysis of these two theories.