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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Covenant Concept In The Book Of Mormon, Noel B. Reynolds Sep 2018

The Covenant Concept In The Book Of Mormon, Noel B. Reynolds

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By the middle of the twentieth century the biblical notion of covenant had taken center stage for many leading students of the Bible. Following such scholars as Walther Eichrodt, many of these increasingly recognized God’s covenant with Abraham as the principal unifying thread for the entire Bible.[1] But the covenant concept itself became controversial and was understood quite differently in the competing interpretive traditions. No small part of the difficulty stemmed from the fact that for a variety of reasons the Hebrew term berit, which is usually translated as covenant, firmly resisted the most competent efforts to ascertain ...


Context Matters: Exploring Methods Of Dissonance Reduction In Conflict Resolution, James L. Martherus Apr 2015

Context Matters: Exploring Methods Of Dissonance Reduction In Conflict Resolution, James L. Martherus

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One of the first steps in intergroup conflict resolution is to humanize the "enemy" or outgroup. Unfortunately, this humanization often fails. My goal in this paper is to answer the following question: Why does positive information about a group sometimes lead to negative responses? Specifically, this paper tests three hypotheses. First, I hypothesize that Individuals with high ingroup-centric beliefs will react differently to the treatments compared to individuals with low ingroup-centric beliefs. Second, I hypothesize that individuals who experience dissonance as a result of the treatments will react negatively to the treatments. Finally, I hypothesize that the framing of these ...


Cybersecurity And The Future International Competitiveness Of The United States, Tai Gray Apr 2015

Cybersecurity And The Future International Competitiveness Of The United States, Tai Gray

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Cybersecurity is inseparably connected to the future international competitiveness of the United States and must play a more significant role in both governmental and private spheres of American society. To increase the strength of U.S. cybersecurity and defend against future attacks, the government should devote more resources to providing cybersecurity tools and information to the public, promoting the implementation of secure forms of communication and purchasing, as well as researching and developing both offensive and defensive cyber tools. By focusing efforts on these three key areas, the U.S. government can better prepare for future cyberattacks and minimize risk ...


Herbert Hoover And Belgian Relief, Albert Winkler Jun 2013

Herbert Hoover And Belgian Relief, Albert Winkler

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Herbert Hoover was an orphan, who retained great empathy for the weak and hungry his entire life. Working without pay, he organized and administered Belgian Relief starting in 1914 to get food to ten million Belgians and Frenchmen behind German lines. His efforts doubtlessly saved hundreds of thousands from starvation. This was only the starting point in his career as the "Great Humanitarian." He got food to Germany at the end of both world wars, aided Russia in their great famine, and reportedly got food to hundreds of millions of people in his lengthy career. No one has ever done ...


Unraveling The "Gypsy Question": The Tale Of The Romanian Roma And Solutions To Romani Integration, Thomas Biggs Jan 2013

Unraveling The "Gypsy Question": The Tale Of The Romanian Roma And Solutions To Romani Integration, Thomas Biggs

Library Research Grants

The Roma are a misunderstood and often controversial minority in Europe and across the globe, even their name is a source of dispute; e.g., “Roma” versus “Gypsy.” Although difficult, Romani integration into Romanian society is possible; however, this integration requires an informed approach in policy and public attitude. Often times, local governmental focus centers not on what can be done for the Roma, but what can be done about them. This approach lacks understanding, although its sentiment is the basis of the “Gypsy Question,” both in Romania and in Europe. Integration of the Roma, at its foundation, requires an ...


Features Of Greek Satyr Play As A Guide To Interpretation For Plato's "Republic", Noel B. Reynolds Aug 2012

Features Of Greek Satyr Play As A Guide To Interpretation For Plato's "Republic", Noel B. Reynolds

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The paper borrows from recent work by classicists on satyr play and demonstrates significant parallels between Plato’s Republic and the structure, theme, and stereotypical contents that characterize this newly studied genre of ancient Greek drama. Like satyr play, the Republic includes repeated passages where metatheatricality can reverse the meaning. The frequent occurrence of all the stereotypical elements of satyr play in Plato’s Republic also suggests to readers that they should be responding to Socrates’s narration as they would to a satyr play, again reversing meaning by communicating a set of literary expectations to Plato’s readers over ...


Who Wrote Bacon? Assessing The Respective Roles Of Francis Bacon And His Secretaries In The Production Of His English Works, Noel B. Reynolds, G. Bruce Schaalje, John M. Hilton Jul 2012

Who Wrote Bacon? Assessing The Respective Roles Of Francis Bacon And His Secretaries In The Production Of His English Works, Noel B. Reynolds, G. Bruce Schaalje, John M. Hilton

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In an earlier study that identified previously unrecognized writings of the young 15 Thomas Hobbes, questions were raised about the authorship of some of Francis Bacon’s published works. This article reports a follow-up study in which two independent statistical analyses of Bacon’s English works both conclude that, whereas Bacon’s autographic writings show clearly that they are authored by the same person; almost none of his published works can be matched statistically 20 with the autographs. The most likely explanation for this dramatic finding is that Bacon’s well-known reliance on secretaries may have been sufficiently extensive that ...


Has A New Way Of Measuring Religion Uncovered A Religious Left?, Matthew Frei Jan 2011

Has A New Way Of Measuring Religion Uncovered A Religious Left?, Matthew Frei

Library Research Grants

Research typically reveals that religious voters tend to be conservative and Republican. However, a new survey question used on the American National Elections Study (ANES) was recently developed to separate individualistic Christians from communitarian Christians by asking whether they try more to help others or to avoid sin. Scholars have used the question to claim that religious communitarians lean to the political left. This analysis shows that the new ANES question is correlated with partisan identification, but should not be interpreted as evidence of a religious left.


Why We Don’T Understand The Rule Of Law Or Explaining The Rule Of Law: A Practice In Search Of A Theory, Noel B. Reynolds Jun 2010

Why We Don’T Understand The Rule Of Law Or Explaining The Rule Of Law: A Practice In Search Of A Theory, Noel B. Reynolds

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This lecture summarizes the main attempts to formulate an understanding of rule of law among legal theorists and explains why they fail to account for the real experience of law. It also explains key characteristics of law that need to be recognized in an adequate account of the rule of law.


Why We Don't Understand The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds Oct 2009

Why We Don't Understand The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds

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This paper presents an assessment of current theories of law and their continuing failure to account in a convincing way for the rule of law as an ideal that guides and reassures modern democratic societies. It then explores the possibility that emerging understandings of human evolution and brain function may help us understand the process of convention making in a way that could reveal the underlying moral and epistemological context of law and allow us to identify a complete set of standards for the rule of law in human societies.


"To Strengthen The Colonies": French Labor Policy, Indentured Servants, And African Slaves In The Seventeenth Century Caribbean, Robert Taber Aug 2007

"To Strengthen The Colonies": French Labor Policy, Indentured Servants, And African Slaves In The Seventeenth Century Caribbean, Robert Taber

Library Research Grants

No abstract provided.


The Decline Of The American Superpower, Earl H. Fry Jul 2007

The Decline Of The American Superpower, Earl H. Fry

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By 2040, the United States will no longer be considered as a global superpower and the world may be headed toward a long era devoid of any superpowers. This will occur as a result of several negative trends within the United States itself, combined with changing dynamics and exigencies in the global system and the rise of more powerful competitors in Asia and Europe. The negative trends within the United States include unprecedented governmental and international debt, dysfunctional campaign-finance and lobbying systems, unmanageable entitlement and health-care obligations, a deteriorating public education network, an inordinate concentration of wealth and power in ...


Creating An Interactive Classroom: Enhancing Student Engagement And Learning In Political Science Courses, Jonathan D. Mott, Danny Damron Jul 2005

Creating An Interactive Classroom: Enhancing Student Engagement And Learning In Political Science Courses, Jonathan D. Mott, Danny Damron

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Students of the pedagogy of teaching have found that cooperative/problem-based learning activities engage the learner, promote ownership of the material, advance the development of higher-level cognitive skills and increase retention better than more passive learning activities. Despite broad recognition within the political science discipline that classroom activities can and should facilitate better student learning outcomes, political science classes (both large and small) frequently have characteristics that make cooperative/problem-based learning activities more difficult to employ and less likely to succeed. Anonymity in large sections, a steep learning curve of complex concepts, and students who see passivity as the least ...


Legal Theory And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds May 2002

Legal Theory And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds

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In "Legal Theory and the Rule of Law" Noel Reynolds maintains that the rule of law can be understood as a set of conditions that rational actors would impose on any authority they would create to act in their stead in creating and administering legally binding rules. The authority and obligation associated with law derive from this fundamental convention, and the principles of the rule of law are the conditions of that agreement, which become thereby governing principles to which legislatures, judges, and enforcement agencies can be held in their official actions. These generally recognized standards are inherent in this ...


The Rule Of Law: A Reassessment For The Twenty-First Century, Noel B. Reynolds Jan 2002

The Rule Of Law: A Reassessment For The Twenty-First Century, Noel B. Reynolds

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This brief radio address attempts to explain the origins of American liberty and to assess its health at the beginning of the 21st century. The notion of rule of law and the emerging science of constitutionalism enabled America’s founding generation to establish a system of political liberty that continues to stand as a model for all human societies to pursue.


Legal Theory And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds Jan 2002

Legal Theory And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds

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This article proposes that the rule of law can be understood as a set of conditions that rational actors would impose on any authority they would create to act in their stead in creating and administering legally binding rules. The authority and obligation associated with law derive from this fundamental convention, and the principles of the rule of law are the conditions of that agreement, which become thereby governing principles to which legislatures, judges, and enforcement agencies can be held in their official actions. These generally recognized standards are inherent in this conventionalist concept of law in the sense that ...


Pareto Optimality And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds Aug 1998

Pareto Optimality And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds

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In 1959, James M. Buchanan criticized the collectivist misuse of Pareto optimality by the "new welfare economists" and made a first attempt to extend that individualist concept into the political realm. Over the following three decades he further developed his political application of Pareto’s insight to buttress an essentially economic analysis of political exchange that would justify the processes of constitutional democracy in the same way Pareto efficiency justifies free markets. In this paper I will explain why Buchanan’s particular formulations will not work and propose a more comprehensive solution that accomplishes Buchanan’s announced purpose. I will ...


Nephite Kingship Reconsidered, Noel B. Reynolds Aug 1997

Nephite Kingship Reconsidered, Noel B. Reynolds

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This paper extends and updates previous efforts to understand the political dynamic of the Book of Mormon by looking at four themes or issues that can be developed from the text itself. The first is an expansion of earlier treatments of the contradictory political ideologies of the Nephites and Lamanites, which informed relations between these two groups across their thousand-year history. The second is an exploration of the historical possibility that Nephi may never, in fact, have been anointed as king of the Nephite people, which raises in turn a possible need to reassess the character of Nephite kingship. The ...


Thomas Hobbes's "A Discourse Of Laws", Noel B. Reynolds Sep 1994

Thomas Hobbes's "A Discourse Of Laws", Noel B. Reynolds

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The recent discovery that an anonymously published 1620 essay was an early writing of Thomas Hobbes invites investigation of his early thinking. Hobbes relied on mostly classical sources to advance a basically conventionalist theory of law and to anticipate twentieth century analyses of the principles of rule of law such as that made famous by F. A. Hayek.


Rule Of Law In Legal And Economic Theory, Noel B. Reynolds Apr 1993

Rule Of Law In Legal And Economic Theory, Noel B. Reynolds

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Legal positivism, the leading version of legal theory, has shown that a concentration on the meanings and logical relations of legal concepts, however much supplemented by intuition, common sense and legal experience, is not adequate to make full sense out of the human experience of law, and the traditional understandings of legal obligation and rule of law in particular. However, modern economic science has advanced a radically individualistic theoretical approach which has propelled economics to the fore as the most successful of the social sciences. And its basic theoretical stance is proving both attractive and adaptable to all the other ...


Conventionalism And Contractarianism, Noel B. Reynolds Nov 1992

Conventionalism And Contractarianism, Noel B. Reynolds

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In this paper Noel B. Reynolds’s theory of law as convention is compared to the public choice contractarian theory of James M. Buchanan. While there are numerous similarities, major differences emerge. Only conventionalism can produce legal and political authority and norms to guide the use of that authority in maintaining the rule of law. The concept of constructive unanimity is introduced to overcome the ultimate failure of contractarianism to legitimate the authority of law.


The Separation Of Law And Morals, Noel B. Reynolds Nov 1986

The Separation Of Law And Morals, Noel B. Reynolds

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The classic opposition of legal positivism and natural law theory resurfaces continually and reminds us that we have yet to resolve this key conflict in our ways of understanding the moral authority of law. The strengths and weaknesses of the two theories are reviewed—both have fatal flaws. Conventionalism is proposed as a means of finding internal standards in a man-made system of law. The naturally emerging standards for a conventionalist system of law turn out to be the already familiar principles of the rule of law.


Hume And His Critics: Reid And Kames, Noel B. Reynolds May 1986

Hume And His Critics: Reid And Kames, Noel B. Reynolds

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This presentation was in response to Kenneth MacKinnon’s defense of Thomas Reid’s preference for natural virtue against David Hume’s conventionalism in his theory of law. It is argued that because Hume’s legal theory follows easily from his theory of human nature, Reid and Kames—and MacKinnon—need to refute Hume at that level to be successful in their rejection of his conventionalism.


Morality And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds May 1986

Morality And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds

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This paper lays out the logic of a conservative view of liberty and morality based on an understanding of human nature as both social and rational on the one hand, and radically individual and self-seeking on the other. Without public virtue, a people cannot govern itself as a free people. But neither virtue nor moral truth can be legislated. The rule of law under constitutionalism is the most successful human arrangement for providing freedom and allowing moral action on the part of individuals.


Liberal Political Theory And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds Apr 1986

Liberal Political Theory And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds

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The efforts of liberal political theorists like John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin to identify principles and rights based on moral truth as authoritative bases for law and politics ignore the insight of Hume and other conservative theorists that the moral possibilities of human nature generally are limited and are in turn limiting on what can be accomplished, from a moral point of view, through law and politics.


The Union Of Legal And Political Theory, Noel B. Reynolds Jan 1986

The Union Of Legal And Political Theory, Noel B. Reynolds

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This paper explores the social science concept of conventions as a way of understanding law that would bridge the enduring gap between natural law and legal positivist legal theories. It further finds in the conventionalist approach a promising account of the rule of law—both in how it may be characterized and in how it can be assessed in particular legal systems.


Constitutionalism And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds Jan 1986

Constitutionalism And The Rule Of Law, Noel B. Reynolds

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Constitutionalism is the practical science of designing and balancing institutions of public power and authority so as to prevent monopolies of power or the emergence of tyranny. In spite of continuing attempts to ground constitutions in moralistic political theories, they are best understood as formalizations of citizenry agreements to manage their affairs under the rule of law following rules formulated by their legislatures and applied by their judges, all of which are to be selected through established procedures. The emergence of rule of law in primitive societies and in early modern European politics is noted, and the chief contributors to ...


Interpreting Plato's Euthyphro And Meno, Noel B. Reynolds Jan 1985

Interpreting Plato's Euthyphro And Meno, Noel B. Reynolds

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Plato's decision to use heuristic drama (in the tradition of Aeschylus and Sophocles) as a vehicle for his philosophical teachings forces the serious reader to make a careful examination of the literary elements of the dialogues. Plato's basic reason for using this literary form is to provide guidance for the interpretation of the content. As Kitto has observed, "In a great work of art, whether a play, a picture, or a piece of music, the connexion between the form and the content is so vital that the two may be said to be ultimately identical." It is therefore ...


The Doctrine Of The Rule Of Law In The Twentieth Century, Noel B. Reynolds Jan 1985

The Doctrine Of The Rule Of Law In The Twentieth Century, Noel B. Reynolds

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The concept of rule of law has been recognized repeatedly in twentieth century political and philosophical discussion, but with a constantly shifting meaning. In this paper we document most of the serious contributions to thought about rule of law before 1985 as a background to further work on the topic.


George Orwell: Socialist Or Liberal?. Big Brother And The Abuse Of Power., Noel B. Reynolds Jun 1984

George Orwell: Socialist Or Liberal?. Big Brother And The Abuse Of Power., Noel B. Reynolds

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For although he was too strongly independent in his thinking to accept the Marxist or socialist dogmas of his associates, because they did not seem to square with experience, and though he admired the tough resistance of English character and legal institutions to tyranny, Orwell never did tumble to the understanding of man and government which had shaped each over the centuries. Failing to see the constants in human nature as the key to the political problem, he looked around the world both as he perceived it and his literary fellows portrayed it, and concluded that power lust was the ...