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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Effect Of Belief Of Victory On Third-Party Vote Share: Duverger's Law & Why Evan Mcmullin Lost Utah In 2016, John Geilman Apr 2018

The Effect Of Belief Of Victory On Third-Party Vote Share: Duverger's Law & Why Evan Mcmullin Lost Utah In 2016, John Geilman

Undergraduate Honors Theses

A key reason Duverger’s Law is valid is a voter’s belief that a third-party does not have a chance at winning an election in a “first past the post” electoral system. Duverger’s Law has traditionally been explained through two reasons—a mechanical factor and a psychological factor. The mechanical factor focuses on aspects of electoral systems that work against third parties, while the psychological factor focuses on what voters think and feel about third parties. In the 2016 presidential election in the United States, voters in the state of Utah demonstrated that their perception of the electability ...


Popular: The Monopoly Of Force And Iraq’S Popular Mobilization Units, Travis Birch Jan 2018

Popular: The Monopoly Of Force And Iraq’S Popular Mobilization Units, Travis Birch

Sigma: Journal of Political and International Studies

No abstract provided.


Sigma: Journal Of Political And International Studies Jan 2018

Sigma: Journal Of Political And International Studies

Sigma: Journal of Political and International Studies

No abstract provided.


Sigma: Journal Of Political And International Studies Jan 2014

Sigma: Journal Of Political And International Studies

Sigma: Journal of Political and International Studies

No abstract provided.


Methods Of Support Used In The Senate Debate On The Seating Of Reed Smoot: A Content Analysis, Beverly Alice Berry Jan 1968

Methods Of Support Used In The Senate Debate On The Seating Of Reed Smoot: A Content Analysis, Beverly Alice Berry

All Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of this study was to determine how methods of support functioned in the senate debate on the seating of Reed Smoot. In order to clarify the directions of the study, answers to the following questions were sought:
1. How extensively were methods of support used by each side?
2. What was the frequency of supports per assertion by each side?
3. How was the use of support materials distributed among the speakers?
4. How many different methods of support were used by each side?
5. What were the most frequently used methods of support by each side?
6 ...