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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

House Oversight Of The Executive Branch In The 116th Congress, Molly Reynolds Oct 2019

House Oversight Of The Executive Branch In The 116th Congress, Molly Reynolds

Lectures/Events (BMW)

As part of the Brookings Scholar Lecture Series, Brookings Mountain West presents a lecture titled "House Oversight of the Executive Branch in the 116th Congress" by Brookings Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, Molly Reynolds. Democrats promised to undertake oversight of President Trump and the executive branch. This lecture answers questions about the ability of the House of Representatives to fulfill one of Congress’s duties during the Trump administration and previews whether and how this oversight activity may impact the 2020 elections.


Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters Aug 2019

Agenda-Setting In The Regulatory State: Theory And Evidence, Cary Coglianese, Daniel E. Walters

Daniel Walters

Government officials who run administrative agencies must make countless decisions every day about what issues and work to prioritize. These agenda-setting decisions hold enormous implications for the shape of law and public policy, but they have received remarkably little attention by either administrative law scholars or social scientists who study the bureaucracy. Existing research offers few insights about the institutions, norms, and inputs that shape and constrain agency discretion over their agendas or about the strategies that officials employ in choosing to elevate certain issues while putting others on the back burner. In this article, we advance the study of ...


Representational Style And Congressional Elections: New York's 19th District In The 115th Congress, Margaret Mccormick Jun 2019

Representational Style And Congressional Elections: New York's 19th District In The 115th Congress, Margaret Mccormick

Honors Theses

The disconnect between members of Congress and the American public is no secret. Of the three branches of government, the legislative branch is intended to be the most representative of the people. However, it consistently faces the lowest approval ratings among the American public. Although the public largely disapproves of Congress as a legislative body, most Americans support their own representative. This phenomenon is reflected in high reelection rates for congressional incumbents. My thesis examines the relationship between congressional representation and elections through an evaluation of the representational style of Congressman John Faso. Faso, who represented New York’s 19th ...


Institutional Ambition And The Decline Of Congress, Ryan A. Case May 2019

Institutional Ambition And The Decline Of Congress, Ryan A. Case

Honors Theses

According to James Madison's theory of separated powers, ambition among members of each branch of government should prevent one branch from usurping the powers of another. However, this is hard to reconcile with the modern trend of congressional decline and executive aggrandizement. This paper takes a historical and developmental approach to argue that the informal changes to the American Constitution that took place throughout the 20th century combined with the modern trends of polarization and weak citizenship have left Congress weak and Madison's theory ineffective.


The Purple Wave: Gender And Electoral Outcomes In The 2018 Midterms, Semilla B. Stripp May 2019

The Purple Wave: Gender And Electoral Outcomes In The 2018 Midterms, Semilla B. Stripp

Political Science Honors Projects

This thesis offers an analysis of the relationship between gender and electoral outcomes in the 2018 midterm elections. What role did gender play in the success of candidates for the House of Representatives? In answering this question, I quantify women’s success by analyzing the extent to which female candidates’ vote shares can be attributed to their gender. I find that, while controlling for various electoral and biographical factors, female challengers and open seat candidates performed better than their male counterparts, while female incumbents had no advantage over male incumbents. These outcomes also divided along party lines, with Democratic women ...


Barriers To Creating Centralized, Federal Regulatory Policies For Artificial Intelligence Technology: Why Technological Industry Resources Must Inform Federal Policy Initiatives, Brittney Ann Nochimson May 2019

Barriers To Creating Centralized, Federal Regulatory Policies For Artificial Intelligence Technology: Why Technological Industry Resources Must Inform Federal Policy Initiatives, Brittney Ann Nochimson

Theses and Dissertations

ABSTRACT

Under a democratic political system, citizens expect their representatives to promote and protect their interests. Simultaneously, citizens hold their elected officials accountable for defending national interests. While the public has traditionally held federal officials accountable for regulating science and technology (S&T) industry, the widespread development and implementation of Internet services in the 1990’s raised questions among the public of who is truly responsible for protecting cybersecurity interests (Neal, et al., 2011, p. 36). Recently, the 2016 American presidential election has augmented public concerns over cybersecurity and data privacy with respect to artificial intelligence (AI) technology (Berger & Pappas ...


Better Left Unsaid: The Connection Between Members Of Congress, Presidents, And Political Ambiguity, Grace Alexa Pittman Jan 2019

Better Left Unsaid: The Connection Between Members Of Congress, Presidents, And Political Ambiguity, Grace Alexa Pittman

University Honors Program Theses

During the course of an election cycle, candidates often deliver vague statements regarding their positions on policies. Furthermore, incumbent candidates typically have a record of obscure actions unknown to the voter. Presently, existing literature maintains ambiguity in terms of an interaction between the candidate and the constituent. According to this literature, candidates use ambiguity to exploit voter uncertainty on policy issues. However, I argue that congressional members, motivated by re-election, will act similarly to candidates by utilizing ambiguity. In this research, I propose that it is the president’s popularity that triggers a congressional member’s ambiguity. Using a method ...


Catching Congress Up: Restoring The Office Of Technology Assessment, Bruno Youn Jan 2019

Catching Congress Up: Restoring The Office Of Technology Assessment, Bruno Youn

CMC Senior Theses

Congress has become infamous for its lack of understanding of technology, particularly with the Facebook and Google hearings in 2018. To improve this understanding, this thesis argues for the return of the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), a congressional support agency created in 1972 that provided science and technology expertise to Congress until its termination in 1995. It also considers potential changes that might be made to the old OTA model and the political environment in which a new OTA would need to survive.


Partisan Targets Of Media Fact-Checking: Examining President Obama And The 113th Congress, Stephen J. Farnsworth, S Robert Lichter Jan 2019

Partisan Targets Of Media Fact-Checking: Examining President Obama And The 113th Congress, Stephen J. Farnsworth, S Robert Lichter

Political Science and International Affairs

An analysis of statements by President Obama and by Democratic and Republican members of Congress selected for analysis by PolitiFact.com and Washington Post Fact Checker reveals that PolitiFact was more likely to find greater deceit in Republican rhetoric and that the Fact Checker was more negative overall in its assessments. Legislators who had more than one statement analyzed during the study period were disproportionally likely to be influential members of the House or Senate leadership or likely 2016 presidential candidates. The lawmakers selected for greater scrutiny were also more likely to be more ideologically extreme than the median members ...


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: A Case Study Of Social Media As An Agenda Setting Tool In The U.S. House Of Representatives, Jenna Floricel Lewinstein Jan 2019

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: A Case Study Of Social Media As An Agenda Setting Tool In The U.S. House Of Representatives, Jenna Floricel Lewinstein

Scripps Senior Theses

The purpose of “Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez: A Case Study of Social Media as an Agenda Setting Tool in the U.S. House of Representatives” is to explore the impact of a politician’s social media presence on agenda setting in Congress. It was born out of the research question, “how do freshman members of the House of Representatives seek power and influence in their first term?” I answer this using Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as a case study, as she is a current freshman legislator with undeniable power and influence. I studied Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s tweets from two time periods: the month ...


Deliberation's Demise: The Rise Of One-Party Rule In The Senate, Charles Tiefer, Kathleen Clark Jan 2019

Deliberation's Demise: The Rise Of One-Party Rule In The Senate, Charles Tiefer, Kathleen Clark

Roger Williams University Law Review

Much of the recent legal scholarship on the Senate expresses concern about gridlock, which was caused in part by the Senate’s supermajority requirement to pass legislation and confirm presidential nominees. This scholarship exalted the value of procedural changes permitting the majority party to push through legislation and confirmations, and failed to appreciate salutary aspects of the supermajority requirement: that it provided a key structural support for stability and balance in governance. The Senate changed its rules in order to address the problem of partisan gridlock, and now a party with a bare majority is able to force through much ...


S02, E02: Eviction Part 2 – The Longer Take, Nia Rodgers, Katheryn Howell, Benjamin Teresa, Donna Coghill Jan 2019

S02, E02: Eviction Part 2 – The Longer Take, Nia Rodgers, Katheryn Howell, Benjamin Teresa, Donna Coghill

Civil Discourse Podcast

This podcast is a continuation of the podcast Eviction Part 1. It discusses cases of eviction, how the instability of housing impacts individuals and neighborhoods, section eight and how eviction is just the latest form of dispossession of people. It looks at neighborhoods in Richmond that have seen instability in some form over the last 100 years.


The Legislative Recycling Bin: A Reevaluation Of The Policy Process, Angelina L. González-Aller Nov 2018

The Legislative Recycling Bin: A Reevaluation Of The Policy Process, Angelina L. González-Aller

Political Science ETDs

Congressional scholarship has long sought to understand the conditions under which a member of Congress is successful in converting a policy idea into a law. Two areas of this research, the bill sponsorship literature and the legislative effectiveness literature, have developed scholarly understanding on both the motivations and outcomes of bill sponsorship, as well as illuminating the conditions under which a bill is more likely to become law. The empirical approaches of these areas of study however, do not adequately capture the complexities of Congress. Most studies of the legislative process treat bill sponsorship and the policy process as a ...


Rights And Retrenchment In The Trump Era, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang Oct 2018

Rights And Retrenchment In The Trump Era, Stephen B. Burbank, Sean Farhang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Our aim in this essay is to leverage archival research, data and theoretical perspectives presented in our book, Rights and Retrenchment: The Counterrevolution against Federal Litigation, as a means to illuminate the prospects for retrenchment in the current political landscape. We follow the scheme of the book by separately considering the prospects for federal litigation retrenchment in three lawmaking sites: Congress, federal court rulemaking under the Rules Enabling Act, and the Supreme Court. Although pertinent data on current retrenchment initiatives are limited, our historical data and comparative institutional perspectives should afford a basis for informed prediction. Of course, little in ...


Blurring Institutional Boundaries: Judges' Perceptions Of Threats To Judicial Independence, Alyx Mark, Michael A. Zilis Oct 2018

Blurring Institutional Boundaries: Judges' Perceptions Of Threats To Judicial Independence, Alyx Mark, Michael A. Zilis

Political Science Faculty Publications

The legislature wields multiple tools to limit judicial power, but scholars have little information about how judges interpret variant threats and which they find most concerning. To provide insight, we conduct original interviews regarding legislative threats to courts with over two dozen sitting federal judges, representing all tiers of the federal judiciary. We find that judges have a nuanced understanding of threats and tend to identify components of legislative proposals that threaten formal institutional powers as more concerning than those challenging policy set by judges. This distinction has broad implications for our understanding of judicial behavior at the federal level.


Secrecy Vs. Disclosure Of The Intelligence Community Budget: An Enduring Debate, Anne Daugherty Miles Sep 2018

Secrecy Vs. Disclosure Of The Intelligence Community Budget: An Enduring Debate, Anne Daugherty Miles

Secrecy and Society

Little known U.S. congressional documents, dating from the 1970s, debate public disclosure of Intelligence Community (IC) budget. The documents offer a rich repository of the arguments on both sides of the debate and shine a light on the thoughtful, measured congressional oversight practiced in formative years of the House and Senate intelligence committees.


The Political Nature Of Defense Policy In Congress, Timothy Welter Jul 2018

The Political Nature Of Defense Policy In Congress, Timothy Welter

Dissertations

Is defense policy more collegial than other policy issues addressed by Congress? More specifically, what are the institutional and political motives which drive a majority of the members of Congress to consistently transcend partisanship in order to pass defense focused legislation into law?

The purpose of this study was to test whether or not the consideration of defense policy in the House of Representatives is unique in its ability to transcend partisanship. And if so, why?

Hypothesis: The formulation of defense policy in the U.S. House of Representatives is approached with more collegiality than other policy issue areas, mainly ...


Gender, Party, And Political Communication In The 114th Congress, Maria Gabryszewska Jun 2018

Gender, Party, And Political Communication In The 114th Congress, Maria Gabryszewska

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation investigates the interaction of gender and party in the political communication of members of Congress (MCs). The study focuses on the tweets of all MCs in the House of Representatives during two weeks of the 114th Congress (9,374 tweets from 431 MCs). I conduct an in-depth content analysis of these tweets to extract important message characteristics related to issue areas, electoral behaviors, and constituency targeting.

I find that MCs emphasize their partisan ties when they tweet about women’s or men’s issues, but Democratic congresswomen and Republican congressmen go further to address feminine and masculine ...


The Effectiveness Of Minority Party Legislative Strategies In Congress, Jocelyn Porter May 2018

The Effectiveness Of Minority Party Legislative Strategies In Congress, Jocelyn Porter

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

This paper expands upon previous research that analyzed the tactics minority party members of Congress use to get their policies considered or oppose the majority party agenda. The paper evaluates various minority party strategies and their effectiveness. Effectiveness of a strategy is defined by the success of the minority party in achieving its legislative goals after implementing a tactic (i.e. a majority party sponsored bill not receiving enough votes to pass the chamber). I analyze persuasion, compromise, and obstruction as three strategies minority party members use. Minority party members employ obstruction when they take steps to block the movement ...


Participation And Representation: Does Risk Acceptance Influence The Decision Making Of Political Actors?, Joshua Daniel Hostetter May 2018

Participation And Representation: Does Risk Acceptance Influence The Decision Making Of Political Actors?, Joshua Daniel Hostetter

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

ABSTRACT

Are political actors influenced by their acceptance of risk? By political actors I mean individuals in society or government that have an influence on political outcomes. By risk acceptance I mean the degree to which an individual is comfortable with uncertainty and willing to challenge the status quo. The purpose of the present dissertation is to further enhance scholarly understanding of the causal psychological mechanisms that influence political behavior by considering individual risk acceptance.

Kam’s (2012) theoretical framework suggests that risk-accepting individuals are more likely to participate in politics because they seek out exciting and novel activities. She ...


Oops!... I Infringed Again: An Analysis Of U.S. Copyright And Its Intended Beneficiaries, Gabriele A. Forbes-Bennett Apr 2018

Oops!... I Infringed Again: An Analysis Of U.S. Copyright And Its Intended Beneficiaries, Gabriele A. Forbes-Bennett

Student Theses

This paper seeks to establish the reasons why federal copyright protection was created, discuss the shifts in reasoning behind major amendments, and explore its effects on copyright holders and the public, with a slight focus on the music industry. Federal copyright has existed in the United States since the late 1700s, with the creation of the Copyright Act in 1790. Adopted from the first copyright law ever created, the English Statute of Anne (1710), the Copyright Act was meant to protect citizens from piracy in a world where the risk of such a thing was rapidly increasing. The stated objective ...


Nevertheless, She Legislated: A Study Of Women Representing Women In Congress, Meghan Mullon Apr 2018

Nevertheless, She Legislated: A Study Of Women Representing Women In Congress, Meghan Mullon

All College Thesis Program, 2016-present

Though women make up only a small fraction of the nation’s legislature, they are often stronger legislators than their male colleagues. Scholars have also found that, over time, these women pay more attention to issues considered more salient to women voters than their male counterparts do. But do women legislators provide better substantive representation to women in the electorate in comparison to men? This study utilizes methodology outlined by Frisch and Kelly (2003) to determine patterns in congresswomen’s committee assignments, and methodology utilized by Michele Swers (2002b) to determine whether women serving in the 111th, 113th ...


How Intense Policy Demanders Shape Postreform Politics: Evidence From The Affordable Care Act, Philip B. Rocco, Simon F. Haeder Apr 2018

How Intense Policy Demanders Shape Postreform Politics: Evidence From The Affordable Care Act, Philip B. Rocco, Simon F. Haeder

Political Science Faculty Research and Publications

The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been a politically volatile process. The ACA's institutional design and delayed feedback effects created a window of opportunity for its partisan opponents to launch challenges at both the federal and state level. Yet as recent research suggests, postreform politics depends on more than policy feedback alone; rather, it is shaped by the partisan and interest-group environment. We argue that “intense policy demanders” played an important role in defining the policy alternatives that comprised congressional Republicans' efforts to repeal and replace the ACA. To test this argument, we drew on an ...


Unintended Consequences In Higher Education Finance Policy: Implications For Current Income-Share Agreement Legislative Efforts And Beyond, Patrick A. Zancolli Mar 2018

Unintended Consequences In Higher Education Finance Policy: Implications For Current Income-Share Agreement Legislative Efforts And Beyond, Patrick A. Zancolli

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

Although the creation of a federal financial aid system in the United States has greatly expanded opportunity for students seeking postsecondary education, the higher education financing system faces a handful of problems in its current state. At the same time that the higher education financing system is facing these issues, an alternative to traditional student loans known as income-share agreements (ISAs) is gaining attention. There is currently a lack of federal legislation that provides a national framework for ISA providers and students to work within. Policymakers are considering this situation and attempting to address it in a way that properly ...


Presidential Rhetoric And The Federal Reserve, C. Damien Arthur Jan 2018

Presidential Rhetoric And The Federal Reserve, C. Damien Arthur

C. Damien Arthur

Presidents persistently use their rhetoric as a mechanism of influence over salient policies. As the economy has become more salient, presidents have tried to gain a semblance of control over its direction and robustness. Yet, there exists no substantial research regarding whether the rhetoric is influential with the most important economic actors such as the Federal Reserve. Assessing whether presidential cues and signals shape the Fed’s economic behavior provides an assessment of rhetoric’s effect. Utilizing the economic speeches from D.D. Eisenhower through B.H. Obama this paper questions whether the Fed’s behavior modeled what the presidents ...


Foreign Policy By Fiat: An Examination Of The United States Decision Making Process On Iraq From 1990-1998, Shawn Mcfall Jan 2018

Foreign Policy By Fiat: An Examination Of The United States Decision Making Process On Iraq From 1990-1998, Shawn Mcfall

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis explores how the United States identified Iraq as a threat to its national interest from 1990 to 1998. The international relations literature is heavily skewed toward exploring the question of why states engage in conflict and neglecting how a country identifies a threat. Therefore, this thesis focuses on the threat identification policy process. This thesis examines two security moves – the Gulf War and the Iraq Liberation Act – and uses primary documents to reveal how the foreign policy apparatus concluded that Iraq was a threat. Through the two cases, I found that foreign policy decisions were made on an ...


Constitutional Barriers To Congressional Reform, John M. Greabe Dec 2017

Constitutional Barriers To Congressional Reform, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

Americans celebrate our Constitution as a beacon that can guide us through difficult situations. And justly so. But at times, the Constitution also has stood as a barrier to necessary reform.


Sexual Misconduct And Congressional Self-Governance, John M. Greabe Nov 2017

Sexual Misconduct And Congressional Self-Governance, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

[Excerpt] "Over the past year, a number of prominent politicians (including President Donald Trump) have been publicly accused of serious sexual misconduct and abuse of power. The question therefore has arisen: Can these politicians either be barred from taking office or removed from office on the basis of these accusations?

There is only way to remove a sitting president: impeachment by the House of Representatives and conviction by the Senate. But the topic of impeaching and removing a president warrants its own column. This column will instead focus on what Congress may do when its members and members-elect face charges ...


The Political Glass Cliff: Potential Causes Of Female Underrepresentation In The U.S. House Of Representatives, Erica Browning May 2017

The Political Glass Cliff: Potential Causes Of Female Underrepresentation In The U.S. House Of Representatives, Erica Browning

Honors Program Projects

The study of gender equality in leadership roles has for the majority of its history focused on the phenomenon of the glass ceiling. A new theory has recently immerged calling attention to the idea that women who attain leadership roles are set up in crisis or failure situations more often than their male counterparts. This is called the ‘glass cliff theory’ and over the past decade has been studied in the fields of business and politics. This research will discuss the leadership stereotypes that may affect women in these roles, and the evidence of the existence of the glass cliff ...


(Un-)American Movement: Unaccompanied Immigrant Children And The Rhetoric Of Space And Identity, Emily K. Royer Apr 2017

(Un-)American Movement: Unaccompanied Immigrant Children And The Rhetoric Of Space And Identity, Emily K. Royer

Political Science Honors Projects

Immigration, in all its various forms, has become one of the most pressing issues of the modern era. In the contemporary United States, the arrival of migrants—be they refugees, asylum seekers, documented or undocumented immigrants—is often figured as a problem of existential proportions. In this project, I turn my attention to a significant recent development in the new American immigration “crisis.” During the summer months of 2014, the United States witnessed a period of heightened migration by unaccompanied children from the Central American nations of Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Through a rhetorical analysis of congressional hearings held ...