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United States History

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Whose Rebellion? Reformed Resistance Theory In America: Part Ii, Sarah Morgan Smith, Mark David Hall Apr 2018

Whose Rebellion? Reformed Resistance Theory In America: Part Ii, Sarah Morgan Smith, Mark David Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

Students of the American Founding routinely assert that America's civic leaders were influenced by secular Lockean political ideas, especially on the question of resistance to tyrannical authority. In the first part of this series, we showed that virtually all Reformed writers, from Calvin to the end of the Glorious Revolution, agreed that tyrants could be actively resisted. The only debated question was who could resist them. In this essay, we contend that the Reformed approach to active resistance had an important influence on how America's Founders responded to perceived tyrannical actions by Parliament and the Crown.


Whose Rebellion? Reformed Resistance Theory In America: Part I, Sarah Morgan Smith, Mark Hall Oct 2017

Whose Rebellion? Reformed Resistance Theory In America: Part I, Sarah Morgan Smith, Mark Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

Students of the American Founding routinely assert that America's civic leaders were influenced by secular Lockean political ideas, especially on the question of resistance to tyrannical authority. Yet virtually every political idea usually attributed to John Locke was alive and well among Reformed political thinkers decades before Locke wrote the Second Treatise. In this two-part essay, we trace just one element of the Reformed political tradition: the question of who may actively and justly resist a tyrant. We focus on the American experience but begin our discussion by considering the early Reformers.


Reformed Political Theory In The American Founding (Chapter Two Of Roger Sherman And The Creation Of The American Republic), Mark David Hall Jan 2012

Reformed Political Theory In The American Founding (Chapter Two Of Roger Sherman And The Creation Of The American Republic), Mark David Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

This chapter provides an overview of the Calvinist world into which Sherman was born and raised. It offers an introduction to Reformed political theory, and sketches its transmission from Europe to America. It considers and rejects the possibility that the founders were significantly influenced by a secularized Lockean liberalism. It concludes by demonstrating, contrary to assertions by many scholars, that Sherman was a serious Calvinist.


Kidd's "God Of Liberty: A Religious History Of The American Revolution"- Book Review, Mark Hall Jun 2011

Kidd's "God Of Liberty: A Religious History Of The American Revolution"- Book Review, Mark Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

No abstract provided.


James Wilson: Presbyterian, Anglican, Thomist, Or Deist?: Does It Matter? (Chapter 7 Of The Founders On God And Government), Mark Hall Jan 2004

James Wilson: Presbyterian, Anglican, Thomist, Or Deist?: Does It Matter? (Chapter 7 Of The Founders On God And Government), Mark Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

Excerpt: "James Wilson is buried in America's Westminster Abby-Christ Church, Philadelphia. This Anglican church is only blocks away from the First Presbyterian church in Philadelphia, where Wilson rented a pew until the end of his life. Some scholars report that Wilson joined the Anglican Communion in 1778, perhaps at the behest of one his best friends, William White, the first Anglican bishop of Philadelphia. Others claim he that never abandoned the Presbyterianism of his native Scotland. Still others pay no attention to his denominational commitments, arguing that he was actually a Thornist or a deist. Finally, some scholars say ...


James Wilson's Law Lectures, Mark David Hall Jan 2004

James Wilson's Law Lectures, Mark David Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

Excerpt: "A major problem faced by students of political theory, philosophy, or law in the founding era is that many of America's intellectual leaders did not write systematic essays or books. Accordingly, scholars often have to reconstruct their subjects' thoughts based on their actions, contributions to public debates (e.g., speeches in conventions and newspaper articles), and private correspondence. Works like Jefferson's Notes on Virginia, Adams's Thoughts on Government, and The Federalist Papers are partial exceptions to this rule, and scholars have made good use of them. Perhaps the clearest exception to the rule, however, is James ...


James Wilson, A Man For All Seasons (Chapter 7 Of The Political And Legal Philosophy Of James Wilson 1742-1798), Mark David Hall Jan 1997

James Wilson, A Man For All Seasons (Chapter 7 Of The Political And Legal Philosophy Of James Wilson 1742-1798), Mark David Hall

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

Excerpt: "This work began with the claim that James Wilson was one of the most important, yet one of the most frequently overlooked, founders. It has attempted to demonstrate that he merits examination because of his significant role in the founding period. Wilson's contributions as a member of Congress, constitution maker, law professor, and Supreme Court justice should not be overlooked. But his political significance does not necessarily mean that his political theory is worthy of attention."