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United States History

Kent State University

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

One Nation Divided By Slavery: Remembering The American Revolution While Marching Toward The Civil War, Michael F. Conlin Nov 2015

One Nation Divided By Slavery: Remembering The American Revolution While Marching Toward The Civil War, Michael F. Conlin

American Abolitionism and Antislavery

The centrality of the American Revolution in the antebellum slavery controversy

In the two decades before the Civil War, free Americans engaged in “history wars” every bit as ferocious as those waged today over the proposed National History Standards or the commemoration at the Smithsonian Institution of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. In One Nation Divided by Slavery, author Michael F. Conlin investigates the different ways antebellum Americans celebrated civic holidays, read the Declaration of Independence, and commemorated Revolutionary War battles, revealing much about their contrasting views of American nationalism.

While antebellum Americans agreed on many elements of national identity ...


To Plead Our Own Cause: African Americans In Massachusetts And The Making Of The Antislavery Movement, Christopher Cameron Jun 2014

To Plead Our Own Cause: African Americans In Massachusetts And The Making Of The Antislavery Movement, Christopher Cameron

American Abolitionism and Antislavery

The antislavery movement entered an important new phase when William Lloyd Garrison began publishing the Liberator in 1831—a phase marked by massive petition campaigns, the extraordinary mobilization of female activists, and the creation of organizations such as the American Anti-Slavery Society. While the period from 1831 to 1865 is known as the heyday of radical abolitionism, the work of Garrison’s predecessors in Massachusetts was critical in laying the foundation for antebellum abolitionism. To Plead Our Own Cause explores the significant contributions of African Americans in the Bay State to both local and nationwide antislavery activity before 1831 and ...


Denmark Vesey’S Revolt: The Slave Plot That Lit A Fuse To Fort Sumter, John Lofton, Peter C. Hoffer Oct 2013

Denmark Vesey’S Revolt: The Slave Plot That Lit A Fuse To Fort Sumter, John Lofton, Peter C. Hoffer

American Abolitionism and Antislavery

New edition of a classic social history

In 1822, Denmark Vesey was found guilty of plotting an insurrection—what would have been the biggest slave uprising in U.S. history. A free man of color, he was hanged along with 34 other African Americans in Charleston, South Carolina, in what historians agree was probably the largest civil execution in U.S. history. At the time of Vesey’s conviction, Charleston was America’s chief slave port and one of its most racially tense cities. Whites were outnumbered by slaves three to one, and they were haunted by memories of the ...


A Self-Evident Lie: Southern Slavery And The Threat To American Freedom, Jeremy Tewell Jan 2012

A Self-Evident Lie: Southern Slavery And The Threat To American Freedom, Jeremy Tewell

American Abolitionism and Antislavery

A Self-Evident Lie explores and underscores the fear and complex meaning of “slavery” to northerners before the Civil War. Many northerners asked: If slavery was the beneficent and paternalistic institution that southerners claimed, could it not be applied with equal morality to whites as well as blacks? Republicans repeatedly expressed concern that proslavery arguments were not inherently racial. Irrespective of race, anyone could fall victim to the argument that they were “inferior,” that they would be better off enslaved, that their enslavement served the interests of society, or that their subjugation was justified by history and religion.

In trenchant and ...


The Imperfect Revolution: Anthony Burns And The Landscape Of Race In Antebellum America, Anthony Burns Jan 2010

The Imperfect Revolution: Anthony Burns And The Landscape Of Race In Antebellum America, Anthony Burns

American Abolitionism and Antislavery

Gripping re-examination of the rendition of Anthony Burns

On June 2, 1854, crowds lined the streets of Boston, hissing and shouting at federal authorities as they escorted the fugitive slave Anthony Burns to the ship that would return him to his slaveholders in Virginia. Days earlier, handbills had littered the streets decrying Burns’s arrest, and abolitionists, intent on freeing Burns, had attacked with a battering ram the courthouse in which he was detained, leaving one dead, several wounded, and thirteen in custody. In the end it would take federal officials nearly 2,000 troops and $40,000 to send ...