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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Justice For Border Crossing Peoples, David Watkins Nov 2015

Justice For Border Crossing Peoples, David Watkins

Political Science Faculty Publications

This chapter seeks to advance the conceptual and normative analysis of what Rogers Smith (2014) calls “appropriately differentiated citizenship” for a particular category of would-be border crossers who have so far been absent from the normative literature on immigration and exclusion: border crossing peoples.

Such peoples are defined by a longstanding history of crossing a particular international border for reasons — cultural, political, and/or economic — central to their collective identity. National territorial rights theorists such as David Miller argue that restrictive immigration policies can be justified via a collectivist Lockean analogy: Private property rights are to individuals as national territory ...


The Politics Of The Presidential Medal Of Freedom: A Fifty Year Analysis, 1963-2013, Kyle C. Kopko, E. Fletcher Mcclellan, Christopher J. Devine, Jillian E. Casey, Julia L. Ward Oct 2015

The Politics Of The Presidential Medal Of Freedom: A Fifty Year Analysis, 1963-2013, Kyle C. Kopko, E. Fletcher Mcclellan, Christopher J. Devine, Jillian E. Casey, Julia L. Ward

Political Science Faculty Publications

Established in 1963, the Presidential Medal of Freedom (PMOF) is the nation’s highest civilian honor. Presidents award the Medal at their discretion to “any person who has made an especially meritorious contribution to (1) the security or national interests of the United States, or (2) world peace, or (3) cultural or other significant public or private endeavors” (Executive Order 11085). Using an original database of all 1963-2013 PMOF recipients, we analyze how presidents exercise this symbolic unilateral power. In particular, we find that Democratic and Republican presidents differ in their recognition of various categories of achievement. Also, presidents have ...


Republicanism At Work: Strategies For Supporting Resistance To Domination In The Workplace, David Watkins Sep 2015

Republicanism At Work: Strategies For Supporting Resistance To Domination In The Workplace, David Watkins

Political Science Faculty Publications

Work, as organized in contemporary workplaces and situated in social and political structures, poses a threat to freedom that has been underappreciated in political theory, especially liberal political theory. The recent revival of republicanism offers an intriguing alternative: Can republicanism do any better, with respect to work and freedom?

An examination of the workplace through a republican lens does a better job of helping us make sense of the way work threatens freedom — by exposing us to the threat of domination — and it can generate at least three plausible proposals that might render resistance to domination in the workplace more ...


Ideological Social Identity: Psychological Attachment To Ideological In-Groups As A Political Phenomenon And A Behavioral Influence, Christopher J. Devine Sep 2015

Ideological Social Identity: Psychological Attachment To Ideological In-Groups As A Political Phenomenon And A Behavioral Influence, Christopher J. Devine

Political Science Faculty Publications

Motivated by symbolic ideology research and Social Identity Theory (SIT), this article introduces an original measure of ideological social identity (ISI) designed to capture feelings of psychological attachment to an ideological in-group and facilitate analysis of their attitudinal and behavioral effects. Data from a nationally representative sample of survey experimental participants indicates that the ISI scale is empirically distinct from ideological self-placement, the standard measure of symbolic ideology, and it conditions the effects of self-placement on vote choice in actual and hypothetical election scenarios. ISI is also common within the American public, particularly among conservatives, and responsive to environmental stimuli ...


A Phenomenological Study Of Conservative Academic Librarians, Kaetrena D. Davis, Ione Damasco Aug 2015

A Phenomenological Study Of Conservative Academic Librarians, Kaetrena D. Davis, Ione Damasco

Roesch Library Faculty Publications

Librarianship posits itself as a profession that strives for neutrality, particularly within customer service and information provision; however, factors such as political activity, conference programming, and disproportionate representations of specific viewpoints in the literature indicate that neutrality may be compromised. These factors may alienate librarians who do not subscribe to majority political opinions within librarianship.

A phenomenological study was conducted to understand the career experiences of academic librarians who identify as socially or politically conservative. Themes linking service provision, ethics, workplace relationships, and professional engagement emerged that demonstrate the professional impact politicized activity has on practicing librarians in all specialties.