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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Twitter Effect, Caitlin Byrne Jul 2011

The Twitter Effect, Caitlin Byrne

Caitlin Byrne

Extract: In its short history, Twitter-the latest social networking phenomenon-has emerged from within the boundaries of political oppression as a potential enabler of human rights. A product of Western culture. Twitter's relevance to human rights rests in liberal political theory. In particular, Twitter gives effect to first generation human rights, articulated by the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UNDHR) in 1948, and subsequently codified in international law by the UN's International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) in 1966. The potential of Twitter presents both serious challenges and opportunities for advancing human rights, which this ...


Cv, Tracy Devine Guzmán Jun 2011

Cv, Tracy Devine Guzmán

Tracy Devine Guzmán

No abstract provided.


Cv, Tracy Devine Guzmán Jun 2011

Cv, Tracy Devine Guzmán

Tracy Devine Guzmán

No abstract provided.


The Globalization Of World Politics: Case Studies From Australia, New Zealand And The Asia Pacific, Stuart Murray Dec 2010

The Globalization Of World Politics: Case Studies From Australia, New Zealand And The Asia Pacific, Stuart Murray

Stuart Murray

No abstract provided.


Probable Futures, Mindy Peden Dec 2010

Probable Futures, Mindy Peden

Mindy Peden

This essay examines the status of "the future" in political theory and asks how views about the future contribute to, undermine, or otherwise interact with normative approaches in general.


Ditching The Script: Moving Beyond Automatic Thinking In Introductory Political Science Courses., Robert W. Glover, Daniel Tagliarina Dec 2010

Ditching The Script: Moving Beyond Automatic Thinking In Introductory Political Science Courses., Robert W. Glover, Daniel Tagliarina

Robert W. Glover

No abstract provided.


Review: William Connolly--A World Of Becoming, Robert W. Glover Dec 2010

Review: William Connolly--A World Of Becoming, Robert W. Glover

Robert W. Glover

No abstract provided.


Radically Rethinking Citizenship: Disaggregation, Agonistic Pluralism, And The Politics Of Immigration In The United States, Robert W. Glover Dec 2010

Radically Rethinking Citizenship: Disaggregation, Agonistic Pluralism, And The Politics Of Immigration In The United States, Robert W. Glover

Robert W. Glover

The status of citizenship and the rights extended to non-citizens are among the most contentious and hotly-debated political issues in numerous Western polities. Some scholars, most notably Seyla Benhabib, have deemed the contemporary changes a ‘disaggregation of rights claims’, in which the interplay between ideals of particularism and universalism lead to an ‘unbundling’ of civil, political, and social rights with formal national membership. Yet this theoretical framing harbors deficiencies which complicate our understanding of the contemporary politics of immigration. In this piece, I critically examine this account to show both its theoretical shortcomings and the incomplete explanations to which these ...


“Subalternidade Hegemônica: Darcy Ribeiro E A Virtude Da Contradição.”, Tracy Devine Guzmán Dec 2010

“Subalternidade Hegemônica: Darcy Ribeiro E A Virtude Da Contradição.”, Tracy Devine Guzmán

Tracy Devine Guzmán

Forthcoming 2011


Cv, Tracy Devine Guzmán Dec 2010

Cv, Tracy Devine Guzmán

Tracy Devine Guzmán

No abstract provided.


International Boggarts: Carl Schmitt, Harry Potter And The Transfiguration Of Identity, Emma R. Norman Dec 2010

International Boggarts: Carl Schmitt, Harry Potter And The Transfiguration Of Identity, Emma R. Norman

Emma R. Norman

Of all the magical monsters in Harry Potter, boggarts are interesting both for the narrative function they perform, and for how they emphasize the complex relation between identity and violence in international politics. In this paper I show that the Potter series illuminates how globalization has transfigured our conceptions of collective identity and violence—to the point where conventionally accepted theories of international relations are having trouble dealing with them. Boggarts arouse our deepest fears, and amorphously shape-shift according to those fears. Consequently, no one knows what a boggart really looks like—adding to our insecurities. The parallels with contemporary ...