Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Political Science Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Unmaking History: Seth's Europe's Indians, Mindy Peden Jul 2011

Unmaking History: Seth's Europe's Indians, Mindy Peden

Mindy Peden

Book review of: Vanita Seth. Europe’s Indians: Producing Racial Difference, 1500-1900.


Situating Race And Nation In The U.S. Context: Methodology, Interdisciplinarity And The Unresolved Role Of Comparative Inquiry, Mindy Peden Dec 2008

Situating Race And Nation In The U.S. Context: Methodology, Interdisciplinarity And The Unresolved Role Of Comparative Inquiry, Mindy Peden

Mindy Peden

Philosophers and social theorists of color examine how racism can creep into defensive forms of nationalism.


'Democratic Taxation' And Quantifiable Action: Scientizing Dilemmas, Mindy Peden Jul 2008

'Democratic Taxation' And Quantifiable Action: Scientizing Dilemmas, Mindy Peden

Mindy Peden

Against the easy presupposition that such a thing as 'democratic taxation' not only exists but is also practicable, this paper points to the dilemma posed by what I call 'quantifiable action.' The essay develops an approach to theorizing the place of taxation in political theory that counters trends in fiscal sociology, political science, and liberal theory by highlighting how taxation presumably violates the requirement that self-government includes an absence of instrumental rationality on the part of democratic citizens. For this reason, taxation presents a persistent problem for any concept of self-government, and may usefully be regarded as a technology of ...


The Entrepreneurial Assumption: Thinking About Taxes In Contemporary Political Theory, Mindy Peden Mar 2008

The Entrepreneurial Assumption: Thinking About Taxes In Contemporary Political Theory, Mindy Peden

Mindy Peden

This article argues that contemporary political theory often contains an obscured supposition that I call the entrepreneurial assumption. This assumption can be seen most clearly when political theorists who do not have economic expertise per se theorize the relationship between their political thought and taxation. In order to explicate the entrepreneurial assumption, the article engages in close readings of John Rawls, Robert Nozick, and Ronald Dworkin. By elaborating on each of these authors' views, the importance of preserving “talent” through a system of taxation, the centrality of the entrepreneurial assumption can be seen more clearly.