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Political Theory

Public Deliberation

Democratization

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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Instrumental Value Of Deliberative Democracy – Or, Do We Have Good Reasons To Be Deliberative Democrats?, Jonathan W. Kuyper Jun 2018

The Instrumental Value Of Deliberative Democracy – Or, Do We Have Good Reasons To Be Deliberative Democrats?, Jonathan W. Kuyper

Journal of Public Deliberation

Though commanding a prominent role in political theory, deliberative democracy has also become a mainstay of myriad other research traditions in recent years. This diffusion has been propelled along by the notion that deliberation, properly conceived and enacted, generates many beneficial outcomes. This article has three goals geared toward understanding whether these instrumental benefits provide us with good reasons – beyond intrinsic ones – to be deliberative democrats. First, the proclaimed instrumental benefits are systematized in terms of micro, meso, and macro outcomes. Second, relevant literatures are canvassed to critically assess what we know – and what we do not know – about deliberation ...


Transformative Deliberations: Participatory Budgeting In The United States, Hollie Russon Gilman Dec 2012

Transformative Deliberations: Participatory Budgeting In The United States, Hollie Russon Gilman

Journal of Public Deliberation

This article develops two conceptual models, based on empirical data, for assessing deliberation and decision making within United States adoptions of Participatory Budgeting (PB). The first model is results oriented whereas the second model is process oriented. The two models evince the tension between inclusiveness and efficiency that emerge as U.S. PB tries accommodating the dual goals of improved short-term service delivery and democratic deepening. Each model satisfies one of these deliberate goals better. Results oriented deliberation is more effective at producing viable projects whereas process oriented is better at ensuring that all participants’ voices are heard. Variation suggests ...