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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

International Trade In The San Bernardino Region: Transportation, Trends, And Employment, Mirya R. Holman, Travis Coan Dec 2006

International Trade In The San Bernardino Region: Transportation, Trends, And Employment, Mirya R. Holman, Travis Coan

Mirya R Holman

International trade presents significant employment, growth, and revenue opportunities for the San Bernardino region, which encompasses San Bernardino County and several cities in Riverside County and is located to the immediate east of Los Angeles County. Proximity to the San Pedro Bay Port complex (which includes the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach) and access to a transportation and logistics network expanding out across the U.S., makes the San Bernardino region a prime location for companies participating in international trade activity. The purpose of this report is to quantify trade activity in the region, while also estimating the ...


Judicial Selection, Appointments Gridlock, And The Nuclear Option, David S. Law, Lawrence B. Solum Nov 2006

Judicial Selection, Appointments Gridlock, And The Nuclear Option, David S. Law, Lawrence B. Solum

David S. Law

In this paper, we employ simple formal models drawn from political science to explain the occurrence of gridlock in the federal judicial selection process, and to explore the implications of the nuclear option, by which a bare majority of senators employs parliamentary tactics to abolish the filibuster with respect to judicial nominations. Our application of a pivotal politics model leads us to reject the notion that appointments gridlock is a straightforward consequence of divided government. Instead, meaningful changes to the ideological balance of the federal bench require a more demanding ideological alignment of multiple veto players relative to the status ...


Bilateral Breakdown: U.S. – Canada Pollution Disputes, Noah D. Hall Jul 2006

Bilateral Breakdown: U.S. – Canada Pollution Disputes, Noah D. Hall

Noah D Hall

The United States and Canada have one of the strongest bilateral relationships in the world, and the history of cooperation and diplomacy on environmental matters has been a major part of their relationship. However, as some recent efforts to resolve U.S.- Canadian pollution disputes through diplomacy and international law have failed, environmental advocates have looked to domestic litigation in U.S. courts to vindicate their rights. Is this a welcome development for environmental protection or a troubling trend for bilateral diplomacy? This essay explores the recent developments with a historical perspective and provides some recommendations for balancing the competing ...


The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael Mann Jun 2006

The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael Mann

Michael D. Mann

This Comment explores how television shows such as CSI and Law & Order have created heightened juror expectations in courtrooms across America. Surprise acquitals often have prosectors scratching their heads as jurors hold them to this new "Hollywood" standard. The Comment also analyzes the CSI phenomena by reflecting on past legal television shows that have influenced the public's perception of the legal profession and how the "CSI effect" has placed an even greater burden on parties to proffer some kind of forensic evidence at trial.

The Comment was published in volume 24 of the Buffalo Public Interest Law Journal (2006).


Toward A New Horizontal Federalism: Interstate Water Management In The Great Lakes Region, Noah D. Hall May 2006

Toward A New Horizontal Federalism: Interstate Water Management In The Great Lakes Region, Noah D. Hall

Noah D Hall

This article presents a new model for environmental policy, called cooperative horizontal federalism. The cooperative horizontal federalism approach utilizes a constitutional mechanism for states to bind themselves to common substantive and procedural environmental protection standards, implemented individually with regional resources and enforcement. Here, the concept of cooperative horizontal federalism model is illustrated through the recently proposed Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact. Under this proposed compact, the eight Great Lakes states would cooperatively manage the world’s largest freshwater resource under common minimum standards, which are then incorporated into state law and implemented individually. This cooperative horizontal federalism ...


Is Resisting Genocide A Human Right?, David B. Kopel, Paul Gallant, Joanne D. Eisen May 2006

Is Resisting Genocide A Human Right?, David B. Kopel, Paul Gallant, Joanne D. Eisen

David B Kopel

The genocide in Darfur, Sudan, is perhaps the worst human rights crisis of the new century. This article examines the failures of the international response so far, and offers a solution based on international human rights law.

Conducting an in-depth study of the Darfur genocide, and also discussing other genocides, the Article details the inadequacy of many of the international community's response to genocides, including “targeted sanctions” or international peacekeeping forces.

The Article then examines international legal authorities such as the Genocide Convention, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the International Court of Justice, and demonstrates that groups ...


Identity And Market For Loyalties Theories: The Case For Free Information Flow In Insurgent Iraq, Paul D. Callister Mar 2006

Identity And Market For Loyalties Theories: The Case For Free Information Flow In Insurgent Iraq, Paul D. Callister

Paul D. Callister

When monopoly control over the flow of information is lost, the unavoidable consequence is destabilization. Information flow through a society can be understood as a market - not a market exchanging cash for goods, but loyalty for identity. Hence the market is called the Market for Loyalties - so labeled by an economics of information theory first developed by Prof. Monroe Price, of Cardozo Law School, and Director of the Howard M. Squadron Program in Law, Media and Society, to explain government regulation of radio, TV, cable and satellite broadcasting.

In post-invasion Iraq, Saddam Hussein lost or monopoly control over the information ...


“Statistical Judo”: The Rhetoric Of Senate Inaction In The Judicial Appointment Process, E. Stewart Moritz Jan 2006

“Statistical Judo”: The Rhetoric Of Senate Inaction In The Judicial Appointment Process, E. Stewart Moritz

E. Stewart Moritz

This article first briefly summarizes the issues that arise in the lower-court judicial confirmation process, and examines how the issues differ from those that arise during the confirmation of Supreme Court justices. The article considers constitutionally-based differences as well as practical differences in Senate and Executive behavior that have developed during more than two centuries of judicial confirmations. The body of the article offers a chronological history and critique of the rhetoric of both Republican and Democratic senators in discussing lower-court confirmations during the 107th Congress. This congressional session, spanning the years 2001 to 2002, was a particularly interesting one ...


Detainee Treatment Act Of 2005, Arsalan M. Suleman Jan 2006

Detainee Treatment Act Of 2005, Arsalan M. Suleman

Arsalan Suleman

This Recent Development focuses on the legal standards that would govern the treatment and interrogation tactics applicable to detainees held by the United States abroad after the passage of the Detainee Treatment Act (DTA). The article first discusses the legal implications of the DTA as to U.S. law on the use of torture or CID treatment, which primarily concerns Sections 1002 and 1003 of the DTA. Then, it explores certain shortfalls in the scope of these sections on this issue, as the sections do not fully address all of the potential ways in which detainee abuse and torture might ...


La Democracia Deliberativa En Las Sociedades Semiperiféricas. Una Apología, Leonardo García Jaramillo Jan 2006

La Democracia Deliberativa En Las Sociedades Semiperiféricas. Una Apología, Leonardo García Jaramillo

Leonardo García Jaramillo

No abstract provided.


The Recognition Of Same-Sex Relationships: Comparative Institutional Analysis, Contested Social Goals, And Strategic Institutional Choice, Nancy J. Knauer Jan 2006

The Recognition Of Same-Sex Relationships: Comparative Institutional Analysis, Contested Social Goals, And Strategic Institutional Choice, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

The emerging field of comparative institutional analysis (CIA) has much to offer public policy analysts. However, the failure of CIA to address the dynamic process through which social goals are articulated limits the scope of its application to the largely prescriptive pronouncements of legal scholars. By examining the movement for equal recognition of same-sex relationships, this Essay builds on the basic observations of CIA and introduces a new dimension, namely the dynamic process through which social goals are articulated and social change is pursued. The acknowledgment that the production of social goals involves institutional behavior, as well as multiple sites ...


The Marginal Utility Of Consolidated Agency Hearings In Ohio: A Due Process Analysis From An Economic Perspective, Chris Mcneil Jan 2006

The Marginal Utility Of Consolidated Agency Hearings In Ohio: A Due Process Analysis From An Economic Perspective, Chris Mcneil

Christopher B. McNeil, J.D., Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


Mutual Recognition And Enforcement Of Arbitral Awards In Mainland China And Taiwan: A Breakthrough In Cross-Strait Relations, Jason A. Blatt Jan 2006

Mutual Recognition And Enforcement Of Arbitral Awards In Mainland China And Taiwan: A Breakthrough In Cross-Strait Relations, Jason A. Blatt

Jason A Blatt

While political relations between China and Taiwan have gone from bad to worse in recent years, the growing importance of economic relations between both sides of the Taiwan Strait has compelled governments on both sides to amend relevant laws and regulations so that courts may recognize and enforce arbitral awards rendered by each other's arbitral organizations. This historic trend started in 1992, when Taiwan passed a statute authorizing courts to recognize and enforce Chinese arbitral awards. China reciprocated in 1998 by issuing regulations permitting recognition and enforcement of Taiwan-issued arbitral awards. Significantly, courts on both sides have recently begun ...