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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Given Today's New Wave Of Protectionsim, Is Antitrust Law The Last Hope For Preserving A Free Global Economy Or Another Nail In Free Trade's Coffin?, Allison Murray Feb 2019

Given Today's New Wave Of Protectionsim, Is Antitrust Law The Last Hope For Preserving A Free Global Economy Or Another Nail In Free Trade's Coffin?, Allison Murray

Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review

No abstract provided.


Venezuela Undermines Gold Miner Crystallex's Attempts To Recover On Its Icsid Award, Sam Wesson Feb 2019

Venezuela Undermines Gold Miner Crystallex's Attempts To Recover On Its Icsid Award, Sam Wesson

Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review

No abstract provided.


New Documents Shed Light: Why Did Peacekeepers Withdraw During Rwanda’S 1994 Genocide?, Emily A. Willard Dec 2018

New Documents Shed Light: Why Did Peacekeepers Withdraw During Rwanda’S 1994 Genocide?, Emily A. Willard

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

Why did the international community decide to withdraw United Nations peacekeeping troops from Rwanda during the 1994 genocide? Analysis of newly released documents and results from an international conference with former U.N. and government officials sheds further light on our understanding of what took place leading up to and during the Rwandan genocide. This article focuses on two key moments: 1) the United States’ reluctance to support the peacekeeping mission from before its mandate began and prior to the killing of U.S. troops in Somalia in autumn 1993; and the United States’ central role pushing the United Nations ...


Domestic And International Firearm Laws: Can Implementation Be Used To Nationally Decrease Firearm Violence And Mass Shootings, Kenneth Banuelos May 2018

Domestic And International Firearm Laws: Can Implementation Be Used To Nationally Decrease Firearm Violence And Mass Shootings, Kenneth Banuelos

Themis: Research Journal of Justice Studies and Forensic Science

The issue of firearm violence in the United States is highly controversial, as there are sound arguments on both sides of the discussion. Advocates of stricter gun laws often refer to both international and domestic examples that highlight the effectiveness of more restrictive firearm policies. Japan and Australia are two such countries that are continually referred to when a tragedy, such as a mass shooting, occurs in the United States and initial reactions often emphasis a need for fewer guns in the general public. Opposition to the proposed reforms of firearm policies cite the importance of the Second Amendment which ...


Do Women Justices Matter?, Ashley Shula Oct 2017

Do Women Justices Matter?, Ashley Shula

The Eastern Illinois University Political Science Review

In recent years, women have started to have a considerable impact on the political process. While literature exists on women in Congress and in district court settings, little research exists on the role played by female Supreme Court Justices. The author attempts to shed light on the impact of female justices by assessing statements made by the justices, in addition to their voting records. The author finds that the new women Supreme Court Justices have had little impact so far, but offers that perhaps as time goes on, this will change.


A Mission Of Divine Calling: A Chosen Nation's Crusade Against Evil, Ashley Harrington Oct 2017

A Mission Of Divine Calling: A Chosen Nation's Crusade Against Evil, Ashley Harrington

The Eastern Illinois University Political Science Review

For decades, political scientists have and continue to theorize about influences on presidential decision-making and policy implementation. Faith and religious analysis however, remain relatively new to the study of presidential politics. This particular research examines two Republican presidents, both Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush, that had vastly different ideas about how to combat nations whose policies limited freedom and liberty.


Why Congress Does Not Challenge Judicial Supremacy, Neal Devins Apr 2017

Why Congress Does Not Challenge Judicial Supremacy, Neal Devins

William & Mary Law Review

Members of Congress largely acquiesce to judicial supremacy both on constitutional and statutory interpretation questions. Lawmakers, however, do not formally embrace judicial supremacy; they rarely think about the courts when enacting legislation. This Article explains why this is so, focusing on why lawmakers have both strong incentive to acquiesce to judicial power and little incentive to advance a coherent view of congressional power. In particular, lawmakers are interested in advancing favored policies, winning reelection, and gaining personal power within Congress. Abstract questions of institutional power do not interest lawmakers and judicial defeats are seen as opportunities to find some other ...


Judicial Supremacy Revisited: Independent Constitutional Authority In American Constitutional Law And Practice, Mark A. Graber Apr 2017

Judicial Supremacy Revisited: Independent Constitutional Authority In American Constitutional Law And Practice, Mark A. Graber

William & Mary Law Review

The Supreme Court exercises far less constitutional authority in American law and practice than one would gather from reading judicial opinions, presidential speeches, or the standard tomes for and against judicial supremacy. Lower federal court judges, state court justices, federal and state elected officials, persons charged with administering the law, and ordinary citizens often have the final say on particular constitutional controversies or exercise temporary constitutional authority in ways that have more influence on the parties to that controversy than the eventual Supreme Court decision. In many instances, Supreme Court doctrine sanctions or facilitates the exercise of independent constitutional authority ...


A Taxonomy Of Independent Electoral Reapportionment Systems, James Ruley Jan 2017

A Taxonomy Of Independent Electoral Reapportionment Systems, James Ruley

Indiana Journal of Constitutional Design

This paper addresses a means of checking legislative gerrymandering, which I have called the Independent Electoral Reapportionment Commission (IERC). Its purpose is to prevent self-interested politicians from drawing biased constituency lines. While scholars have researched gerrymandering, few scholars have researched commissions designed to limit such gerrymandering, and no comprehensive work details the global means of accomplishing this goal.

Thus, the purpose of this paper is not to normatively prescribe the best practices for composing and empowering an IERC, but rather to descriptively show how different countries conduct this process. While Part II makes some determinations about which commissions may conceptually ...


Where’S The Consultation? The War Powers Resolution And Libya, Eileen Burgin Jan 2014

Where’S The Consultation? The War Powers Resolution And Libya, Eileen Burgin

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “President Barack Obama triggered a War Powers Resolution (WPR) controversy with his military response to the anti-government rebellion and civil war in Libya in 2011. Members of Congress seized upon the WPR, questioning whether the Obama administration had complied with the WPR’s requirements when the United States launched the initial Libyan Operation Odyssey Dawn (OOD) and subsequently participated in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Operation Unified Protector (OUP). Many legislators charged that President Obama had violated the WPR. Concerns centered on such issues as presidential reliance on the United Nations (U.N.) Security Council—rather than Congress ...


Shaping Water Policy: Political Influences In The European Union And United States, Christopher Young Apr 2011

Shaping Water Policy: Political Influences In The European Union And United States, Christopher Young

Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union

No abstract provided.


Identity After Identity Politics, Linda Nicholson Jan 2010

Identity After Identity Politics, Linda Nicholson

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Linda Nicholson’s Article tackles the complexity of how identity politics manifest in the 2008 election. In Identity after Identity Politics, she notes that during the election political and popular commentators continued to speculate about how race and gender were affecting the election, even as people proclaimed that "the era of identity politics was dead" and ushered in a post-identity world. Attempting to explain this contradiction, Nicholson urges an historical explanation rooted in two different visions of identity "difference" that emerged in twentieth century. Identity after Identity Politics investigates how environmental explanations for race and gender differences were put to ...


Globalization And The Secularization Of Immigration Policy: Competing Influences On Immigrant Integration Policy In Germany, France, Britain And The United States, Pamela Irving Jackson, Roderick Parke Jun 2006

Globalization And The Secularization Of Immigration Policy: Competing Influences On Immigrant Integration Policy In Germany, France, Britain And The United States, Pamela Irving Jackson, Roderick Parke

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

This article examines the extent to which anti-racist policy development is on the front line of the struggle between the denationalizing forces of global economic integration and the renationalization efforts inherent to the securitization of immigration policies. Sassen (1999) contends that global economic integration has stimulated labor demands and migration patterns that have fostered the transnationalization of immigration policy and provided some protections to immigrants. Jacobson (1996) and Hollifield (1992) have demonstrated global convergence in human rights standards. But national governments have responded to the supra-national influences in anti-racist and minority integration policy development by substituting internal security goals for ...


We Were Allies Once: Lessons Of D Day, 1944, Nigel Hamilton Dec 2005

We Were Allies Once: Lessons Of D Day, 1944, Nigel Hamilton

New England Journal of Public Policy

Nigel Hamilton swivels the century around the pivot of the massive cooperation and collaboration between the United States and its allies during World War II. In the early years, European and British troops suffered a series of discouraging defeats by the Nazis, and then when the United States entered the war the great collaboration among the allies was instrumental in achieving victory in Europe. This joint effort of nations continued for a time with such institutions as the UN and NATO and other international bodies. The war in Iraq ruptured the alliance. American unilateralism has distinguished most of the debacle ...


Falsities On The Senate Floor, John Cornyn Mar 2005

Falsities On The Senate Floor, John Cornyn

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Costs Of Covert Warfare: Airpower, Drugs, And Warlords In The Conduct Of U.S Foreign Policy, Alfred W. Mccoy Sep 2003

The Costs Of Covert Warfare: Airpower, Drugs, And Warlords In The Conduct Of U.S Foreign Policy, Alfred W. Mccoy

New England Journal of Public Policy

Over the last fifty years the United States has fought four covert wars by using a unique combination of special operations and airpower as a substitute for regular ground troops. Such covert wars are removed from Congressional oversight and conventional diplomacy. Their battlegrounds become the loci of political instability. In highland Asia, while these covert wars are being fought, CIA protection transforms tribal warlords into powerful drug lords linked to international markets. Arguably, every nation needs an intelligence service to warn of future dangers. But should this nation have the right, under U.S. or international law, to conduct its ...


Trends. Spillover: Is United States Government Military Aid To Colombia All Wet?, Editor Oct 2000

Trends. Spillover: Is United States Government Military Aid To Colombia All Wet?, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article discusses spillover of conflicts in Colombia into surrounding countries as related to United States government military aid.


Trends. United States Foreign Policy, Iran, And Mirror Imaging, Editor Apr 2000

Trends. United States Foreign Policy, Iran, And Mirror Imaging, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article discusses the tension between the rule of law and democracy vs. religious authority in the context of international relations between the United States and Iran.


Trends. Immigration And Naturalization Service V. Aguirre, No. 97-1754: Can Crime Be Nonpolitical?, Editor Mar 1999

Trends. Immigration And Naturalization Service V. Aguirre, No. 97-1754: Can Crime Be Nonpolitical?, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This articles discusses a recent Supreme Court case revolving around whether foreigners who have committed serious nonpolitical crimes outside the US are ineligible for refugee status regardless of the severity of persecution that would await them at their countries of origin.


Trends. A Strategic Defense Initiative Against Biological Warfare: Sense? Nonsense? Mal Vu, Mal Dit?, Editor Mar 1998

Trends. A Strategic Defense Initiative Against Biological Warfare: Sense? Nonsense? Mal Vu, Mal Dit?, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

The author discusses the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) that was initiated by United States (US) President Ronald Reagan during his first term.


President Carter's Sermon On Human Rights In Foreign Policy, Charles Veenstra Jun 1979

President Carter's Sermon On Human Rights In Foreign Policy, Charles Veenstra

Pro Rege

No abstract provided.