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International and Area Studies

Diplomacy

The Journal of International Relations, Peace Studies, and Development

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Engaging Global Civil Society: Shifting Normative Frameworks, Moral Diplomacy, & The Future Of International Relations, Jozef A. Kosc Oct 2015

Engaging Global Civil Society: Shifting Normative Frameworks, Moral Diplomacy, & The Future Of International Relations, Jozef A. Kosc

The Journal of International Relations, Peace Studies, and Development

The following exposition outlines a synthesized account of diplomatic relations in the 21st century, highlighting the crucial importance of engaging the Global Civil Society (NGOs and civil society) in an age of global communication, and stressing the importance of the development of a new system of diplomacy, drawing upon the best elements of existent theories. A comparative qualitative framework of analysis—cross-referencing historical cases, political psychology, as well as the writings of diplomatic practitioners—synthesizes the most accurate elements of two contemporary theories of international relations: Lyn Boyd-Judson’s Strategic Moral Diplomacy, and Mervyn Frost’s Constitutive Theory of International ...


Overview Of The Diplomatic Landscape, Patrick Bratton Oct 2015

Overview Of The Diplomatic Landscape, Patrick Bratton

The Journal of International Relations, Peace Studies, and Development

This essay outlines a so-called paradigm shift that is occurring in regard to diplomacy and global politics in general. This is a paradigm shift away from the nation-state towards both non-state actors and individuals, and towards regional and global movements and organizations. In terms of diplomacy, this is seen as moving away from the images of old men in striped pants at formal summits to social movements uniting through social media, sometimes called “citizen diplomacy” or “digital diplomacy”. This inaugural issue, with contributions from AGS students and faculty, will explore and problematize many of these issues. To put the issues ...