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Comparative Politics

2008

Leonard Seabrooke

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

‘Housing As Social Right Or Means To Wealth? Comparing The Politics Of Property Booms In Australia And Denmark’, Jens L. Mortensen, Leonard Seabrooke Jan 2008

‘Housing As Social Right Or Means To Wealth? Comparing The Politics Of Property Booms In Australia And Denmark’, Jens L. Mortensen, Leonard Seabrooke

Leonard Seabrooke

Should housing be considered a social right or a means to wealth? This article compares changes to taxation and housing finance regimes in a liberal market for residential property, Australia, and a corporatist market, Denmark. During the last decade, regulatory changes to taxation and housing finance systems in Australia and Denmark facilitated residential property booms. These reforms, particularly those following financial deregulation, introduced new mortgage instruments and changed economic incentives for selecting residential property as an investment vehicle. The reforms may also be associated with a more general process of transforming taxation and housing finance regimes to favour conception of ...


‘Varieties Of Residential Capitalism In The International Political Economy: New Politics In Old Welfare States’, Herman M. Schwartz, Leonard Seabrooke Jan 2008

‘Varieties Of Residential Capitalism In The International Political Economy: New Politics In Old Welfare States’, Herman M. Schwartz, Leonard Seabrooke

Leonard Seabrooke

Comparative and international political economy are justifiably obsessed with finance as a source of power and as a key causal force for domestic and international economic outcomes. Yet both CPE and IPE ignore the single largest asset in people’s everyday lives and one of the biggest financial assets in most economies: residential property and its associated mortgage debt. This special issue argues that residential housing and housing finance systems have important causal consequences for political behavior, social stability, the structure of welfare states, and macro-economic outcomes. The articles examine specific instances across a range of countries. This introduction has ...