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Comparative Politics

Undergraduate Honors Theses

William & Mary

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Art Of Repression: Digital Dissent And Power Consolidation In El-Sisi’S Egypt, Wesley Garner May 2019

The Art Of Repression: Digital Dissent And Power Consolidation In El-Sisi’S Egypt, Wesley Garner

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Imprecise measurement tools impede the study of protest mobilization. Mobilization proxies, such as counting protesters and protest events, result in significant outliers and variance while ignoring sociocultural, cybernetic, economic, legal, and other features that relevant academic literature considers essential to understanding mobilization dynamics. Without accurate empirical models, researchers’ and policymakers’ investigations of autocratic repression have little explanatory power. This thesis proposes a methodological addition to the mobilization literature: Two three-level scales distinguish an event’s potential to attract an audience from the protest’s actual output relative to similar episodes. I employ the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data (ACLED ...


Who Does The Dying?: 'Martial Races' And War Time Unit Deployment In The Indian Army, Ammon Frederick Harteis May 2019

Who Does The Dying?: 'Martial Races' And War Time Unit Deployment In The Indian Army, Ammon Frederick Harteis

Undergraduate Honors Theses

During the Second World War, the Indian Army held back units and soldiers that were not from the so-called “martial races” from frontline combat service. The British “martial races” theory held that only a small number of communities in India were fit for military service and people from all “non-martial” communities should be excluded from the Army. Has the Indian Army, after gaining independence from British leadership, contended the Second World War practice of deploying “martial” units in combat while assigning “non-martial” units to non-combat roles? It has been conclusively demonstrated that “martial race” groups have contended to be overrepresented ...


A Comparative Analysis Of Media And Legislative Rhetoric On Gun Control, Samyuktha Mahadevan Apr 2019

A Comparative Analysis Of Media And Legislative Rhetoric On Gun Control, Samyuktha Mahadevan

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this paper, I analyze the use of language in the debates on gun laws in three different countries: the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Through systematic analysis of both legislative debates and media coverage of gun violence and gun control, I identify the major frames utilized by these political elites and news networks when discussing the issue.My findings show that there are indeed measurable differences between the rhetoric used by both legislators and the media. Each country has both shared and unique frames that are used by both types of actors. The rhetoric in the United ...


Popular Motherist Activism In Argentina: Why Do Mothers Radicalize?, Emily B. Jackson May 2018

Popular Motherist Activism In Argentina: Why Do Mothers Radicalize?, Emily B. Jackson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 1977, the second year of Argentina’s last dictatorship, the Madres de Plaza de Mayo donned white headscarves (pañuelos) and began weekly marches around the Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires to bring attention to the disappearance of their children. By taking up a public defense of motherhood, they transferred a private role into a public, political act, established themselves as motherist activists, and effectively criticized the dictatorship. Today the women continue to organize, but their agenda has shifted from "apolitical" motherism to a radical anti-neoliberal, anti-imperialist critique. What caused this shift in the Madres' message? Although the literature ...


Hooligans Or Saboteurs? Democratic Backtracking In Eastern Europe, Courtney A. Blackington Apr 2017

Hooligans Or Saboteurs? Democratic Backtracking In Eastern Europe, Courtney A. Blackington

Undergraduate Honors Theses

During the European Union accession negotiations, all post-communist Eastern European countries that became EU members established democratic institutions. Even though some new member states formed more strongly consolidated democratic institutions than others, all established institutions were sufficiently democratic to gain EU membership. Since acceding to the EU, some countries have continued to deepen their democracies, while others’ democracies have stagnated or backtracked. In countries that backslid, some politicians only harmed the quality of democracy in the short-term, while others spurred democratic backsliding lasting beyond just one electoral cycle. This thesis examines the interaction between institutional engineering, political culture, and elite ...


Understanding Secession: An Analysis Of The 2012-2014 Debates On Independence In Scotland And Catalonia, Lucas A. Leblanc May 2015

Understanding Secession: An Analysis Of The 2012-2014 Debates On Independence In Scotland And Catalonia, Lucas A. Leblanc

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 2014, the regions of Scotland and Catalonia voted on independence from their larger states, the United Kingdom and Spain. The period preceding these votes was filled with tense political discussion on a variety of topics ranging from the role of the EU to considerations over social welfare. This thesis presents a cross-regional study of the discussions on the issue of independence that occurred in the years leading up to these historically unique votes. To do this, the paper was inspired by discourse analysis methodology to perform a quantitative test on independence-leaning newspapers from each region. This method traced the ...


Frederick's Chessboard: Domestic Institutions And The Origins Of The Seven Years' War, Caitlin Hartnett Apr 2015

Frederick's Chessboard: Domestic Institutions And The Origins Of The Seven Years' War, Caitlin Hartnett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores why the states involved in the Seven Years’ War chose to go to war in 1756 by analyzing the relationship between the individual leader, domestic institutions and state action. Through a structured-focus comparison of Frederick the Great’s Prussia and Newcastle’s Britain, this thesis argues that the domestic institutional structure determines the level of influence held over state action by the individual leader and their preferences.