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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Caged Bird Still Sings: The Poetics Of Peace, Sofia Diane Skavdahl May 2019

The Caged Bird Still Sings: The Poetics Of Peace, Sofia Diane Skavdahl

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Although poetry has been used as a method of peacemaking since Homer’s Iliad, little research, theory, or analysis has been done evaluating precisely what role poetry holds in the realms of peacemaking and conflict resolution. Poetry, along with other arts-based practices of peacemaking, is beneficial because of its ability to encourage personal autonomy and emotional communication, while offering an open and creative space to heal from violent conflict. In terms of the arts, poetry is especially unique because it holds the ability to transform relationships between adversaries and the relationship with the self. This paper seeks to analyze both ...


The Art Of Repression: Digital Dissent And Power Consolidation In El-Sisi’S Egypt, Wesley Garner May 2019

The Art Of Repression: Digital Dissent And Power Consolidation In El-Sisi’S Egypt, Wesley Garner

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Imprecise measurement tools impede the study of protest mobilization. Mobilization proxies, such as counting protesters and protest events, result in significant outliers and variance while ignoring sociocultural, cybernetic, economic, legal, and other features that relevant academic literature considers essential to understanding mobilization dynamics. Without accurate empirical models, researchers’ and policymakers’ investigations of autocratic repression have little explanatory power. This thesis proposes a methodological addition to the mobilization literature: Two three-level scales distinguish an event’s potential to attract an audience from the protest’s actual output relative to similar episodes. I employ the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data (ACLED ...


Who Does The Dying?: 'Martial Races' And War Time Unit Deployment In The Indian Army, Ammon Frederick Harteis May 2019

Who Does The Dying?: 'Martial Races' And War Time Unit Deployment In The Indian Army, Ammon Frederick Harteis

Undergraduate Honors Theses

During the Second World War, the Indian Army held back units and soldiers that were not from the so-called “martial races” from frontline combat service. The British “martial races” theory held that only a small number of communities in India were fit for military service and people from all “non-martial” communities should be excluded from the Army. Has the Indian Army, after gaining independence from British leadership, contended the Second World War practice of deploying “martial” units in combat while assigning “non-martial” units to non-combat roles? It has been conclusively demonstrated that “martial race” groups have contended to be overrepresented ...


A Comparative Analysis Of Media And Legislative Rhetoric On Gun Control, Samyuktha Mahadevan Apr 2019

A Comparative Analysis Of Media And Legislative Rhetoric On Gun Control, Samyuktha Mahadevan

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this paper, I analyze the use of language in the debates on gun laws in three different countries: the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Through systematic analysis of both legislative debates and media coverage of gun violence and gun control, I identify the major frames utilized by these political elites and news networks when discussing the issue.My findings show that there are indeed measurable differences between the rhetoric used by both legislators and the media. Each country has both shared and unique frames that are used by both types of actors. The rhetoric in the United ...


Party Politics In The Muslim World: The Nexus Between Institutionalization And Agency In The Development Of Islamist Parties, Khalifa Alqaz Jan 2019

Party Politics In The Muslim World: The Nexus Between Institutionalization And Agency In The Development Of Islamist Parties, Khalifa Alqaz

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Islamist parties are comparatively assessed across Muslim majority countries to determine the effects of structural conduciveness and effective agency on party performance. Using correlative studies with historical analyses, institutionalization is observed to establish the limits of party success while effective agency has been demonstrated to facilitate electoral success. These findings suggest that while institutionalization could structurally impede the development of Islamist parties, their ability to spatially compete in party politics were primarily determined by the party’s ability to maximize voter mobilization.


Scandinavian Radicalism: The Politics Of Inequality And Right-Wing Voting, Jeffrey Nonnemacher Jan 2019

Scandinavian Radicalism: The Politics Of Inequality And Right-Wing Voting, Jeffrey Nonnemacher

Undergraduate Honors Theses

What conditions influence a voter’s decision to vote or support the radical right? In this paper, I argue that inequality plays an important role in boosting support for the radical right, but that the relationship is more complicated and depends on where a voter lives and under what conditions. I compile a cross-sectional dataset of Swedish municipalities and conduct an original survey experiment of Swedish citizens in order to determine how inequality impacts support for the radical right, how voters generate perceptions around the issue, and then how they use those perceptions in political decision making. I find that ...


Timing Turnout: The Competing Electoral Schedules Of European Elections, Jeffrey Nonnemacher Jan 2019

Timing Turnout: The Competing Electoral Schedules Of European Elections, Jeffrey Nonnemacher

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Since direct elections to the European Parliament began in 1979, variations in voting behavior in European Parliament (EP) elections from national elections raise interesting questions about political behavior. Previous studies into European elections conclude that turnout is lower because EP elections are second order contests, meaning that they are seen as extensions of national politics and of low importance. However, as the EU has grown, some studies have found that European considerations do influence electoral outcomes in EP elections. In this study, I add to this growing literature on how Europe matter and I argue that EP elections are more ...


Left Or Right?: The Competing Politics Of Europe’S Radical Party Families, Grady Mcginnis Jan 2019

Left Or Right?: The Competing Politics Of Europe’S Radical Party Families, Grady Mcginnis

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Both radical right and left parties are on the rise across Europe. Previous research has shown similarities between voters of radical parties. However, prior analyses have focused on voters of one radical party, while ignoring the other. In turn, differences between radical party voters are inferred rather than proven through qualitative evidence. In this study, I examine support for radical right and left parties across the same years and nine European countries, in order to understand why voters prone to radicalism support either the left or right. I find that while voters of both parties share commonalities, they differ in ...


What Unites The States? Examining Modernity And American Nationhood Through The Eyes Of The European New Right, Sara Canetto Jan 2019

What Unites The States? Examining Modernity And American Nationhood Through The Eyes Of The European New Right, Sara Canetto

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis uses the lens of the European New Right to analyze the development of American nationhood in the era of reinvigorated nationalism and identity politics. To do so, this project uses the 5 processes of modernity (individualization; rationalization; massification; desacralization; universalization) which the New Right describes as the systems that together threaten authentic community and meaning. By using the grounding texts of Against Democracy and Equality and Homo Americanus, this thesis analyzes the points of view of the New Right as well as their contribution to the appeal of nationalism and anti-liberalism.


Welfare And Democratic Legitimacy: The Impact Of Need-Based Welfare On Women’S Political Engagement In Latin America And The United States, Suzannah Ranzo Jan 2019

Welfare And Democratic Legitimacy: The Impact Of Need-Based Welfare On Women’S Political Engagement In Latin America And The United States, Suzannah Ranzo

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Political engagement from a diverse populace is vital for the functioning of a legitimate democracy that proportionately represents the interests of the governed people. Impoverished women experience at least two forms of oppression due to their socioeconomic status and gender—and often other forms of oppression—which intersect to enhance their marginalization and exclusion from the political sphere. This research compares data from the United States and Latin America to discover if receiving welfare benefits from the government can mobilize or hinder low income women from engaging in politics. This research analyzes welfare’s impact on three forms of political ...


Mafia And Globalization: The Consequences Of Economic Integration Without Legal Symmetry, Benjamin White May 2018

Mafia And Globalization: The Consequences Of Economic Integration Without Legal Symmetry, Benjamin White

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This project will examine the relationship between mafia and globalization through the lenses of two case studies, focusing on the Calabrian criminal organization known as ‘Ndrangheta. The first case study revolves around the Port of Gioia Tauro, which serves as the drug trafficking hub of ‘Ndrangheta and is emblematic of the overall trends in global commercial traffic and security deficits. The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate how ‘Ndrangheta exploits the advanced economic integration that began in the 1990s and continues to exist in the gap between frantic commercial activity and limited government oversight. This case study begins ...


Popular Motherist Activism In Argentina: Why Do Mothers Radicalize?, Emily B. Jackson May 2018

Popular Motherist Activism In Argentina: Why Do Mothers Radicalize?, Emily B. Jackson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 1977, the second year of Argentina’s last dictatorship, the Madres de Plaza de Mayo donned white headscarves (pañuelos) and began weekly marches around the Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires to bring attention to the disappearance of their children. By taking up a public defense of motherhood, they transferred a private role into a public, political act, established themselves as motherist activists, and effectively criticized the dictatorship. Today the women continue to organize, but their agenda has shifted from "apolitical" motherism to a radical anti-neoliberal, anti-imperialist critique. What caused this shift in the Madres' message? Although the literature ...


Civic Stratification In Independent Candidacies: A Typology Of Independent Candidates To Executive Office In Mexico, Antonio Huizar Jan 2018

Civic Stratification In Independent Candidacies: A Typology Of Independent Candidates To Executive Office In Mexico, Antonio Huizar

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Reading Mexico’s recently established figure of independent candidates (ICs) in 2014 as an expansion of democratic political rights, I develop a typology of ICs to executive office that illustrates the differentiated access to political rights within a wider context of civic stratification. I argue this electoral mechanism has benefited particular social groups with more economic resources and political capital, and not the average citizen it was purported to benefit. My findings present six main categories of ICs: citizens/activists, entrepreneurs, politicians, bureaucrats, media figures, and oficialistas.


Trust In The Police In Latin America: Understanding The Urban And Rural Divide, Abigail J. Sewall Jan 2018

Trust In The Police In Latin America: Understanding The Urban And Rural Divide, Abigail J. Sewall

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Trust in the police is low throughout Latin America, particularly among residents of urban areas. The principle aim of this investigation is to determine why people in rural areas exhibit higher levels of trust in the police than their urban counterparts. This study focuses on the instrumental perspective of explaining trust, which emphasizes the importance of the performance of the police. Measures of negative experiences with the performance of the police are used to explain the difference in trust between urban and rural areas. The analyses find that people in urban areas are more frequently victimized by crime and solicited ...


An Investigation Into The Socio-Political Dissonance Between The French Government And The Islamic French Minority, Alexandria Exley May 2017

An Investigation Into The Socio-Political Dissonance Between The French Government And The Islamic French Minority, Alexandria Exley

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Islamic minority in France today is experiencing adversity as the government of France passed legislation stating that all facial coverings will be henceforth illegal, restricting or prohibiting religious symbols in various public spaces. Some Islamic women feel as though this is a pointed attack on women of the Muslim faith for their choice to wear traditional clothing which covers the face and body. There have been outcries that this is a human rights violation and restriction of religious rights. This project is an examination of the effects of France’s “burqa ban” and restrictions on religious symbols on both ...


Hooligans Or Saboteurs? Democratic Backtracking In Eastern Europe, Courtney A. Blackington Apr 2017

Hooligans Or Saboteurs? Democratic Backtracking In Eastern Europe, Courtney A. Blackington

Undergraduate Honors Theses

During the European Union accession negotiations, all post-communist Eastern European countries that became EU members established democratic institutions. Even though some new member states formed more strongly consolidated democratic institutions than others, all established institutions were sufficiently democratic to gain EU membership. Since acceding to the EU, some countries have continued to deepen their democracies, while others’ democracies have stagnated or backtracked. In countries that backslid, some politicians only harmed the quality of democracy in the short-term, while others spurred democratic backsliding lasting beyond just one electoral cycle. This thesis examines the interaction between institutional engineering, political culture, and elite ...


Anti-Muslim Sentiment In Developed Nations: A Comparative Study, Eman Bensreiti Jan 2017

Anti-Muslim Sentiment In Developed Nations: A Comparative Study, Eman Bensreiti

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper is a comparative study that aims to explore why anti-Muslims sentiment varies among 32 developed, democratic nations. I delve into the theory that the presence of more Muslims in developed nations leads to a higher anti-Muslim Sentiment. I also delve into the theory that a country with a poor state of economic well-being leads to a higher presence of anti-Muslim sentiment. Anti-Muslim sentiment can be measured numerous ways. A lot of previous research examines anti-Muslim sentiment in developed nations solely on the basis of public opinion polling. This paper will look at three different indicators of anti-Muslim sentiment ...


Ideas Versus Interests: U.S. Foreign Policy And The Honduras Coup Of 2009, Benjamin Richard Purper Jan 2017

Ideas Versus Interests: U.S. Foreign Policy And The Honduras Coup Of 2009, Benjamin Richard Purper

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The 2009 coup in Honduras sparked a crisis in inter-American affairs; after President Manuel Zelaya’s forced removal from office, practically every country in the Western Hemisphere rushed to condemn Honduras’ backslide into authoritarianism. Beyond being merely an unfortunate political event in Central America’s most impoverished nation, the coup represented a challenge to the inter-American human rights and democracy promotion regime that came about as a response to brutal Latin American dictatorships in the Cold War era. Even more abstractly, the coup – and other American states’ reaction to it – signaled the triumph of “realism over principles” for some observers ...


The Relationship Between Power-Sharing And Separatism: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis, Aaron A. Barth Jan 2016

The Relationship Between Power-Sharing And Separatism: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis, Aaron A. Barth

Undergraduate Honors Theses

State borders on maps do not always correspond with how they exist in actuality. Regionalism and ethnonationalism complicate political and territorial dynamics within a state. In some cases, it appears that the federal arrangements of certain subnational territories within a larger state can threaten national stability. Some states have attempted to ease ethnic tension by adopting power-sharing policies. Consociationalism, in which political arrangements are designed to encourage inclusiveness and cooperation, has been touted as one approach to safeguarding stable democracy in multiethnic states. Its effectiveness is not entirely clear, and the scholarship present varying reports of how it affects support ...


Voter Turnout: Ideologically Swayed? Exploring Effects Of Ideologically Extreme Parties On Oecd Countries, Nathaniel L. Pressnall Jan 2016

Voter Turnout: Ideologically Swayed? Exploring Effects Of Ideologically Extreme Parties On Oecd Countries, Nathaniel L. Pressnall

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Abstract:

This paper sets out to explore how voter turnout varies across countries. People turning out to vote are a vital part of any democracy. The people who turn out to vote tend to set the trend for how the country will be run. A lot of the research out there examines how voter turnout varies across nations in an institutional context. I examine how the idea that the amount of political parties has an impact on voter turnout may be better understood in a rational choice framework. This paper looks into how certain types of political parties may have ...


Governmental Agricultural Policy And Its Affect On Population Health, Alexander Steinbach Jan 2016

Governmental Agricultural Policy And Its Affect On Population Health, Alexander Steinbach

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this paper I attempt to establish a link between government agricultural policies of subsidies and the increasing obesity epidemic that is seen across the globe. I attempt to design a research project that explores these dynamics and uses three distinct regional areas for comparison. In this paper I compare the United States, the European Union, and Japan and South Korea to see if government agricultural policy as well as trade implications play a role in rising body mass index (BMI) and obesity. The reason for comparison is due to the level of development coupled with a unique comparison of ...


The Inefficacious Electorate: Political Powerlessness And Vote Choice, Ryan W. Bell Jan 2016

The Inefficacious Electorate: Political Powerlessness And Vote Choice, Ryan W. Bell

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Non--traditional parties have had newfound success across European democracies contributing to increasing electoral volatility. Drawing from the literature on social movements, voting for an unconventional party can be a form of contentious politics. Support for non--mainstream parties is the institutional manifestation of the factors that contribute to social movements. Perceptions of political power and grievances extend beyond non--institutional actions, shaping how individuals cast their ballot, with the inefficacious and dissatisfied voters engaging in electoral disorder. An attitude--ideology approach to non--traditional party support is tested with Bayesian inference using Dutch Parliamentary Election Studies from 1977 to 2006. Voters' perceived influence in ...


Understanding Secession: An Analysis Of The 2012-2014 Debates On Independence In Scotland And Catalonia, Lucas A. Leblanc May 2015

Understanding Secession: An Analysis Of The 2012-2014 Debates On Independence In Scotland And Catalonia, Lucas A. Leblanc

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 2014, the regions of Scotland and Catalonia voted on independence from their larger states, the United Kingdom and Spain. The period preceding these votes was filled with tense political discussion on a variety of topics ranging from the role of the EU to considerations over social welfare. This thesis presents a cross-regional study of the discussions on the issue of independence that occurred in the years leading up to these historically unique votes. To do this, the paper was inspired by discourse analysis methodology to perform a quantitative test on independence-leaning newspapers from each region. This method traced the ...


Frederick's Chessboard: Domestic Institutions And The Origins Of The Seven Years' War, Caitlin Hartnett Apr 2015

Frederick's Chessboard: Domestic Institutions And The Origins Of The Seven Years' War, Caitlin Hartnett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores why the states involved in the Seven Years’ War chose to go to war in 1756 by analyzing the relationship between the individual leader, domestic institutions and state action. Through a structured-focus comparison of Frederick the Great’s Prussia and Newcastle’s Britain, this thesis argues that the domestic institutional structure determines the level of influence held over state action by the individual leader and their preferences.


Institutional And Personal Homophobia In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Post-Materialist Explanation, Andrew Ormsby Jan 2015

Institutional And Personal Homophobia In Sub-Saharan Africa: A Post-Materialist Explanation, Andrew Ormsby

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Sub-Saharan Africa is currently the most homophobic place in the world in terms of both state institutions and public opinions. Many scholars have blamed this on the former colonial powers of Africa who imposed homophobic policies on their landholdings. In order to explain variations in African homophobia, this study conceptualizes homophobia in two forms: institutional, using a measure of the homophobic actions of African states, and personal, using a composite score of multiple opinion surveys regarding homosexuality. Using linear regression models, this paper contends that Inglehhart’s post-materialist framework does a much better job of explaining variation in homophobia within ...


Achieving Universal Access To Water And Sanitation Services: The Role Of Political Will In Implementation Practices, A Study Of Pakistan And India, Sarah Landreth Jan 2015

Achieving Universal Access To Water And Sanitation Services: The Role Of Political Will In Implementation Practices, A Study Of Pakistan And India, Sarah Landreth

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Adequate access to water and sanitation services (WSS) is a fundamental component of human development and has hugely positive effects on health, education, economic productivity, gender equity, and regional stability. Achieving universal access to WSS in a sustainable manner is not only a focus of the UN Millennium Development Goals framework, but it is also a key priority for the entire globe. This paper utilizes qualitative case studies of Pakistan and India to reveal how properly channeling political will is a crucial element to improving the implementation of public service delivery for WSS. Currently, both countries exhibit huge theory-practice gaps ...


Regime Type And Female Health In The World: A Study Of The Effects Of Democracy On Women's Access To Health Care, Maxwell Nathanson Jan 2015

Regime Type And Female Health In The World: A Study Of The Effects Of Democracy On Women's Access To Health Care, Maxwell Nathanson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper studies the relationship between maternal access to health care and democracy. Access to female health services is a critical metric in measuring the overall quality of health care globally, and is an indicator of a state’s cultural, social, and political development. Likewise, the degree of political freedom in a country is correlated with the amount of funding social welfare programs receive (Brown and Hunter, 1999; Navarro et al., 2006).

In this paper, I examine how states ranging from democratic to authoritarian provide health care for their female populations. Using data provided by the World Bank and Freedom ...