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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Digital Political Information Consumption And Ambivalent Political Attitudes., Dane Ryan Warner Aug 2019

Digital Political Information Consumption And Ambivalent Political Attitudes., Dane Ryan Warner

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Understating how individuals form, reinforce, or change attitudes has a long history in political science research. This study seeks to contribute to the existing literature by bridging the gap between the ambivalence and digital political communications literature by examining the relationship between digital political information consumption and ambivalent political attitudes. Using the American National Election Studies 2016 Time Series Study, I examine the role of digital political information consumption as a moderator of value conflict and ambivalent political attitudes. The findings suggest that increased levels of information gather significantly reduce group ambivalence, candidate ambivalence, and value ambivalence.


World Leaders A-Twitter: Communication Platforms And Agenda-Building During The 2018 Nato Summit, Katja Walton Jan 2019

World Leaders A-Twitter: Communication Platforms And Agenda-Building During The 2018 Nato Summit, Katja Walton

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Twitter is a thriving microblogging service with growing prominence in the political sphere. In this study, I examine the differences between Twitter communications and verbal communications by three heads of state and government in relation to the most recent NATO Summit in July 2018. Through a three-step analysis, including descriptive statistics, content and tone analysis, and comparative analysis, the study investigates Twitter’s influence on content and tone and its agenda-building capacity for face-to-face summits. After hand-coding over 2,000 tweets and 15 verbal communications, I find that Twitter does not support more negative content and tone among world leaders ...


Deliberative Mini-Publics As A Partial Antidote To Authoritarian Information Strategies, Robert C. Richards Jr. Dec 2018

Deliberative Mini-Publics As A Partial Antidote To Authoritarian Information Strategies, Robert C. Richards Jr.

Journal of Public Deliberation

Authoritarian or illiberal regimes control a growing number of states throughout the world. Among the information strategies that these regimes use to gain and maintain support are the dissemination of false or misleading policy information and the use of manipulative policy frames. Deliberative mini-publics can partially counter those strategies by distributing accurate policy information and employing non-exploitative policy frames that affirm the dignity of members of the polity as free and equal citizens.


Globalizing Media And International News, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 2018

Globalizing Media And International News, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

A project summary, listing all articles.


Beyond Big Bird, Binders, And Bayonets: Humor And Visibility Among Connected Viewers Of The 2012 Us Presidential Debates, Kevin Driscoll, Alex Leavitt, Kristen L. Guth, François Bar, Aalok Mehta Jan 2018

Beyond Big Bird, Binders, And Bayonets: Humor And Visibility Among Connected Viewers Of The 2012 Us Presidential Debates, Kevin Driscoll, Alex Leavitt, Kristen L. Guth, François Bar, Aalok Mehta

Communication Faculty Publications

During the 2012 US presidential debates, more than five million connected viewers turned to social media to respond to the broadcast and talk politics with one another. Using a mixed-methods approach, this study examines the prevalence of humor and its relationship to visibility among connected viewers live-tweeting the debates. Based on a content analysis of tweets and accounts, we estimate that approximately one-fifth of the messages sent during the debates consisted of strictly humorous content. Using retweet frequency as a proxy for visibility, we found a positive relationship between the use of humor and the visibility of individual tweets. Not ...


Metaphors That Communicate Weight-Based Stigma In Political News: A Case Study Of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, J. Anderson, Y. Zhu, J. Zhuang, J.C. Nelson, M.J. Bresnahan, X. Yan Feb 2017

Metaphors That Communicate Weight-Based Stigma In Political News: A Case Study Of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, J. Anderson, Y. Zhu, J. Zhuang, J.C. Nelson, M.J. Bresnahan, X. Yan

Jenn Anderson

News media use metaphors to describe politics (Landau & Keefer, 2014) and obesity (Barry,Brescoll, Brownell, & Schlesinger, 2009). Weight-based stigma is prevalent in U.S. news media (Heuer,McClure, & Puhl, 2011). Media coverage of politicians’ body size may contain metaphors that stigmatizeweight. Metaphors reflect and shape how people think about important issues like politics or obesity(Landau, Sullivan, & Greenberg, 2009; Landau, Meier, & Keefer, 2010; Landau & Keefer, 2014).Objective – This study uses stigma communication theory (Smith, 2007) to examine stigmatizing metaphors used in media coverage of a United States politician, and candidate for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Republican.Method. – We coded n = 240 articles, from January 2011 to December 2014, that referenced Christie’s weight. Considering both the articles and the comments in response to them, we identified n = 246weight references that utilized metaphors and coded these using categories derived from the stigma communication theory framework.Results. – Our coding ...


Metaphors That Communicate Weight-Based Stigma In Political News: A Case Study Of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, J. Anderson, Y. Zhu, J. Zhuang, J.C. Nelson, M.J. Bresnahan, X. Yan Feb 2017

Metaphors That Communicate Weight-Based Stigma In Political News: A Case Study Of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, J. Anderson, Y. Zhu, J. Zhuang, J.C. Nelson, M.J. Bresnahan, X. Yan

Communication Studies Publications

News media use metaphors to describe politics (Landau & Keefer, 2014) and obesity (Barry,Brescoll, Brownell, & Schlesinger, 2009). Weight-based stigma is prevalent in U.S. news media (Heuer,McClure, & Puhl, 2011). Media coverage of politicians’ body size may contain metaphors that stigmatizeweight. Metaphors reflect and shape how people think about important issues like politics or obesity(Landau, Sullivan, & Greenberg, 2009; Landau, Meier, & Keefer, 2010; Landau & Keefer, 2014).
Objective – This study uses stigma communication theory (Smith, 2007) to examine stigmatizing metaphors used in media coverage of a United States politician, and candidate for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Republican.
Method. – We coded n = 240 articles, from January 2011 to December 2014, that referenced Christie’s weight. Considering both the articles and the comments in response to them, we identified n = 246weight references that utilized metaphors and coded these using categories derived from the stigma communication theory framework.
Results. – Our coding ...


How Presidents Can Become "Hip" By Using High Definition Metaphors Strategic Communication Of Leadership In A Digital Age, Mirela Camelia Stimus Jun 2016

How Presidents Can Become "Hip" By Using High Definition Metaphors Strategic Communication Of Leadership In A Digital Age, Mirela Camelia Stimus

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The aim of this interdisciplinary research was to see whether American presidents can reach Millennials more effectively in the digital age while publicly advancing the legislative agenda of their administration. The rationale is that presidents need to gain public support to pressure Congress into passing their legislation; while doing that, they can capture the public’s interest in politics and educate civically the most inattentive audience. To accomplish the task, strategic messaging adequate to digital media is necessary. Millennials appear as having modest interest and knowledge of politics despite their intense presence on digital media. On the other hand, they ...


China In The Media: Effects On American Opinion, Laura Ruth Silver Jan 2016

China In The Media: Effects On American Opinion, Laura Ruth Silver

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

I explore how the tone of media coverage affects opinions of foreign countries by

studying a particular case: the People’s Republic of China. I exploit the fact that recent

presidential campaigns have focused a great deal of attention on China. Indeed, before

the 2012 presidential election, media coverage of China was particularly high and largely negative due to campaign rhetoric about how China was stealing American jobs and ruining the U.S. economy.

Using a nationally representative, pre- and post- election panel, I explore how

these changes in media valence affect opinions of China. I use an original content ...


The Technologization Of Politics: The Internet And The Electronic Citizen, Charlotte Yun Jan 2015

The Technologization Of Politics: The Internet And The Electronic Citizen, Charlotte Yun

2015 Undergraduate Awards

Dramatic shifts in technology have transformed the structures of civic participation and communication in the latter half of the 20th century, and optimistic presumptions purporting the global establishment of “e-democracy” has become a commonly understood concept. But reality has failed to demonstrate this ideal and has instead proven otherwise: whether online or offline, it is politics as usual. This paper explores the ramifications of online platforms for political engagement from a critical perspective. The author argues that sustaining political activity online in “user-powered,” democratized digital spaces is ultimately fruitless without offline mobilization. While contemporary Web 2.0 platforms for political ...


The Relationship Between The American Government And Society: Congressman John O’Connor And New York’S 16th District During The Great Depression, Kristine Avena Dec 2014

The Relationship Between The American Government And Society: Congressman John O’Connor And New York’S 16th District During The Great Depression, Kristine Avena

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

This research focuses on the interaction between a Congressman and his constituents and how this interaction reflects the larger conversation between the American government and its people. By examining the interrelationship between a political representative and New York’s 16th District between 1931 and 1951, I clarify the role and efforts policy makers made in response to urban societies’ concerns. The two decades studied in this dissertation consists of the post-Prohibition phase, Great Depression, and New Deal programming. The collection I analyze is the “John J. O’Connor Collection” from the Frank Mt. Pleasant Library of Special Collections at Chapman ...


Polarized And Liking It: How Political Polarization Affects Active Avoidance Behavior On Facebook, Bobbi L. Newman Jan 2014

Polarized And Liking It: How Political Polarization Affects Active Avoidance Behavior On Facebook, Bobbi L. Newman

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

This research sought to determine how and if political polarization is affecting behavior on Facebook. An online survey was constructed to measure levels of polarization, offline political activity, online political activity, and active avoidance behaviors on Facebook. The survey was conducted over 4 weeks. I found that those who encounter a higher amount of political content and discussions on Facebook also reported a higher number of active avoidance behaviors over all. This group was also more likely to report unFriending someone because of something that Friend posted related to political or social issues.

Those with a higher number of reported ...


Elections And The Third-Person Effect: Voters' Perception Of The 2012 First Presidential Debate's Effects, Ge Wang Jan 2013

Elections And The Third-Person Effect: Voters' Perception Of The 2012 First Presidential Debate's Effects, Ge Wang

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The first presidential debate in 2012 was unique, in that it significantly changed the original balance and the commonly predicted election outcome. This survey study is theoretically based on the third-person effect approach, aiming to investigate the perceived self-other discrepancy with regards to how the presidential debate influenced voters' knowledge, attitudes and choices. Results showed that there was a stronger third-person effect on the recipients of negative content than those of positive content, but people with stronger party identification would not change their candidate preference by only watching the first presidential debate. This study brings a unique contribution to the ...


Sarah Palin And The Media During The Elections, Angelica Olmos Urbina Jan 2013

Sarah Palin And The Media During The Elections, Angelica Olmos Urbina

Open Access Theses & Dissertations

The purpose of this study is to analyze former candidate Sarah Palin's portrayal by the media during the 2008 political campaign for vice-president of the United States. Through media framing, political communication, politics and the media, the study will present a qualitative study on her portrayal through two different media sources. The presidential elections of 2008 involved two women, a first in American history, and made waves for varying reasons. The purpose of the study is to build a greater understanding between the unique relationship between the media and political candidates.


Political Communication In A Digital Age: 2011 Tea Party Senators And Social Media, Kaitlyn M. Barrett May 2011

Political Communication In A Digital Age: 2011 Tea Party Senators And Social Media, Kaitlyn M. Barrett

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


The Role Of Feminine Rhetoric In Male Presidential Discourse: Achieving Speech Purpose, Lindsay R. Larner May 2009

The Role Of Feminine Rhetoric In Male Presidential Discourse: Achieving Speech Purpose, Lindsay R. Larner

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

Scholars have defined two gender-associated language styles as rhetorical tools that are used by men and women to achieve certain objectives. Masculine language is commanding and instrumental; it is considered conducive to politics. Feminine language is intimate and unifying; it is considered too passive for politics. However, women introduced feminine rhetoric into politics in the United States in 1920 when they were granted the right to participate. But since then, has feminine-style rhetoric played any role in men politicians’ discourse? Specifically, do they use more feminine speech to establish unity and maintain relationships? By comparison, do they use less of ...


Attacking Ethos: The Rhetorical Use Of Uncertainty In The 2004 Election, Theron Allen Verdon May 2008

Attacking Ethos: The Rhetorical Use Of Uncertainty In The 2004 Election, Theron Allen Verdon

Dissertations

The rhetorical use of uncertainty in political communication (and other areas) has many implications. Uncertainty plays a major role in everyday life. Therefore, it likely plays a major role in political decision-making. Research has shown that uncertainty about a candidate affects a voter's voting preference. Uncertainty usually affects voter decisions. Uncertainty was a factor in the 2004 presidential election. The Bush-Cheney Campaign used uncertainty to corrupt the ethos of the Democratic nominee, Senator John Kerry. The Bush-Cheney campaign rhetorically manipulated information about Senator Kerry to create a perception of a leader whose actions revealed an unpredictable flip-flopper. A lack ...


Globalizing Terrorism And The Internet, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jun 2007

Globalizing Terrorism And The Internet, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

The war of the decade is the war on terror. It is a war fought as surely in the public domain of communication and culture as on other battlefields. News organizations that aspire to a global audience constitute this public domain and bring it to the internet. They write and broadcast on the internet because it is their infrastructure for reaching a global audience. This paper assesses how this war is playing itself out in the globalizing media.


Globalizing Walls, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jul 2006

Globalizing Walls, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Globalization seems to homogenize the world as technology dissolves barriers of time and space. The proliferation of international actors and links appears to eat away at the very foundations of the Westphalian state system. Where the global meets the local is at the walls that define the external objective boundaries of political units and the internal subjective identities of their citizens.As globalizing media tell wall stories, they give the walls legitimacy and power. Wall stories in globalizing media imply that the walls are important news. Wall stories reflect and construct an important part of the myths--the dominant narratives-- of ...


United Yet Autonomous: Indymedia And The Struggle To Sustain A Radical Democratic Network, Victor Pickard May 2006

United Yet Autonomous: Indymedia And The Struggle To Sustain A Radical Democratic Network, Victor Pickard

Departmental Papers (ASC)

The past decade has witnessed an emergent form of activism increasingly defined by its reliance on internet strategies, network social structures and participatory practices. Internet strategies employed by many contemporary activists include websites, listservs and hyperlinked networks used for exchanging information, mobilizing both old and new constituencies, and coordinating collective action. Networks of organizations and individuals are formed both on and offline and decision-making within these groups is often made by consensus. Perhaps best characterizing this activism is its lack of hierarchy, epitomized by democratic communications, both within and between networked organizations. This article focuses on Indymedia, a prime institutional ...


North-South Globalization And Action Initiatives: Multiple News Media In The Emerging Global Communication Space, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Mar 2006

North-South Globalization And Action Initiatives: Multiple News Media In The Emerging Global Communication Space, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

The news media are major purveyors of globalization. Globalization becomes present to the citizens of the world as news media reach out to a global audience. As improving communication technologies have made real time global communication possible, northern networks like CNN and BBC have used the technology to develop globally oriented television news programs. Their offerings, CNN WorldView and BBC World, attempt to connect with a global audience. The further development of the web has allowed organizations with considerably less funding than BBC and CNN to try for a global audience as well. The southern network Aljazeera, for example, recently ...


Global Media Diplomacy And Iranian Nuclear Weapons, Francis A. Beer Jan 2005

Global Media Diplomacy And Iranian Nuclear Weapons, Francis A. Beer

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Diplomacy at the start of the 21st century occurs as part of a highly complex global system, both openly and behind closed doors, publicly and and privately. Political actors use the media, and media actors use the politicians to advance their interests in different ways. The question today is not whether or not there shall be diplomatic publicity, but rather who does it where, when, why, and how. The case of Iranian nuclear weapons shows globalizing media and political elites using new technologies as part of a dynamic and sophisticated diplomatic process. Diplomacy behind closed doors is not replaced by ...


Globalizing Sympathy, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Apr 2004

Globalizing Sympathy, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

The paper addresses two features of global disaster broadcasting: 1) the scope of disaster coverage and 2) the method of disaster performance, the way that disasters are turned into tragedies. This process is at the heart of "globalizing sympathy" --emotional connection with a global audience. Global media slowly, subtly, and inexorably expand our sympathy beyond the small screen and our local lives into the larger world.


Leading With Blood In The Streets: Global Broadcasters, Protesters, And Democratic Leaders, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 2004

Leading With Blood In The Streets: Global Broadcasters, Protesters, And Democratic Leaders, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Protesters attempt to broaden conflict by taking advantage of the news media's principle"if it bleeds it leads". Democratic leaders turn that rule back on the protesters. If there is no blood there is no story. All the democratic politicians have to do is disappear. There is no blood. And the protest is silenced. Globalizing media broadcasters and protesters lead with blood in the streets. Globalizing political leaders, on the other hand, can not lead with blood in the streets. Globalizing communication and political actors thus perform the interactive logic of globalization, playing out the mutually reinforcing incentives of ...


The Rhetoric Of Global Leadership: Cooperating, Crusading, And Preparing For War, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 2004

The Rhetoric Of Global Leadership: Cooperating, Crusading, And Preparing For War, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Global telecommunications technology and practice offer the permissive conditions for global political leadership and political rhetoric. Global media provide a new platform, an expanded public domain for talk and action. The medium, as Marshall McLuhan famously said, is the message; but media do not fully determine their own use. The players on the global stage follow their own scripts. Media elites have their own concerns, choosing stories that they feel appropriate for their tasks. Issues like Iraq ebb and flow as a focus of news attention. Political actors seize the stage to a greater or lesser degree. Though their speaking ...


Geography Of Global Communication, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 2003

Geography Of Global Communication, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

The only distance that matters in communication is the distance involved in sending a signal up and then down. The close connection between communication and transportation has been broken. Near and far -- familiar and unfamiliar -- can be constituted by communication. The rhythm of day and night, as it moves around the globe, remains. We can watch a war in Iraq in real time -- except that we are asleep and can wait until we awake to watch the battles. But the images and sounds are just as real as if they were just over the horizon. And that is what they ...


From Behind The Lines, G. Robert Boynton, Francis A. Beer Jan 2002

From Behind The Lines, G. Robert Boynton, Francis A. Beer

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Technology has made global communication nearly instantaneous. It is from anywhere in the world to anywhere in the world in seconds, if you have the equipment that can be carried around in your suitcase. One of the results has been the development of global news broadcasting. Their audience is the world. And they aggressively work to be on all sides of whatever line there is at the moment. The parties are often less enthusiastic about this relationship than are the reporters and broadcasters. But all sides get equal billing. All sides get to have their say,


Globalizing Terror, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 2002

Globalizing Terror, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

The globalization of terror is something new. It goes hand in hand with the globalization of the media. The creation of new media technology has created a public space in which political actors may perform: Terrorists are some of the actors who can now play on a global stage. Kosovo, Israel/Palestine, the twin towers terror is not a sometime thing. Man's inhumanity toward his fellow men makes terror a constant in human affairs. Not very long ago most of the terror was hidden beyond our willingness to wait for the news. That is no longer true. We experience ...


Resisting The Globalizing Economy In Seattle, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton Jan 1999

Resisting The Globalizing Economy In Seattle, Francis A. Beer, G. Robert Boynton

Political Science Faculty Contributions

Seattle, November-December 1999: the third meeting of the Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization. President Clinton was the host. Political leaders came from around the world. The news media-global, national, and local-were there in full force. As were the protesters. For the political leaders who believed that freer trade would improve their economies this was the place to be. For those who believed that freer trade would have a detrimental impact on people and the environment this was also the place to be. It was the point of resistance. For reporters and camera crews the conflict between leaders and ...


An Unfit Standard-Bearer:An Unfit Standard-Bearer: Bill Clinton And The Social Order Expectations Of The Religious Right, Douglas J. Swanson Ed.D Apr Apr 1998

An Unfit Standard-Bearer:An Unfit Standard-Bearer: Bill Clinton And The Social Order Expectations Of The Religious Right, Douglas J. Swanson Ed.D Apr

Douglas J. Swanson, Ed.D APR

This paper deals with the rift between the social order of the so-called Religious Right and the perceived social order established and held by President Bill Clinton as he entered his first term in office. The author, applying Duncan's "social order model," suggests Clinton's age, family history, educational background, work experience, domestic life, social circle, and leadership role--in sum, his symbolization of the presidency, presented to the public through the media--represented an unacceptable and irreconcilable affront to "traditional" Christian expectations for the office.