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Full-Text Articles in Political Science

The Morality Of National Defense: An Aristotelian-Thomist Account, Craig M. White May 2018

The Morality Of National Defense: An Aristotelian-Thomist Account, Craig M. White

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

In current just war theory debates, some scholars claim that a moral right to defend a nation cannot be demonstrated. Others claim that any case for the morality of even defensive war must reflect standards of interpersonal morality. This dissertation goes back to the natural law tradition behind just war theory to offer a moral argument in favor of national defense that is not based on an individualist account, but also rejects absolute accounts of national sovereignty, with its attendant problems. National defense is usually but not always just.

I defend arguing from “a tradition” in MacIntyre’s sense, and ...


Beyond Secularism: Radical Orthodoxy In Conversation With Radical Democracy, Matthew Raymond Bradney Jan 2017

Beyond Secularism: Radical Orthodoxy In Conversation With Radical Democracy, Matthew Raymond Bradney

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

In my dissertation, I set for myself three basic tasks. First, I try to show that much radical democratic theory results in nihilism. Second, I draw out the consequences of nihilism. Put briefly, the major consequence of nihilism is the unreasonable character of almost all of our deeply held moral and political beliefs, such as the dignity of human beings, the value of democracy, the importance of rights, and so forth. The nihilistic conclusion, then, is that the West cannot justify its own values. Third, and most importantly, I examine how the conclusion of nihilism might be avoided. Is there ...


Beyond The Democratic State: Anti-Authoritarian Interventions In Democratic Theory, Brian Carl Bernhardt Jun 2014

Beyond The Democratic State: Anti-Authoritarian Interventions In Democratic Theory, Brian Carl Bernhardt

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Though democracy has achieved widespread global popularity, its meaning has become increasingly vacuous and citizen confidence in democratic governments continues to erode. I respond to this tension by articulating a vision of democracy inspired by anti-authoritarian theory and social movement practice. By anti-authoritarian, I mean a commitment to individual liberty, a skepticism toward centralized power, and a belief in the capacity of self-organization. This dissertation fosters a conversation between an anti-authoritarian perspective and democratic theory: What would an account of democracy that begins from these three commitments look like? In the first two chapters, I develop an anti-authoritarian account of ...


An Honest Heart And A Knowing Head: A Study Of The Moral, Political, And Educational Thought Of Jean-Jacques Rousseau And Thomas Jefferson, Jason Robles Jan 2012

An Honest Heart And A Knowing Head: A Study Of The Moral, Political, And Educational Thought Of Jean-Jacques Rousseau And Thomas Jefferson, Jason Robles

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The picture of democracy we get from both Thomas Jefferson and Jean-Jacques Rousseau is one that is characterized by potentiality or possibility: the development of democracy and the cultivation of virtuous, republican citizens are processes of perpetual becoming, or perpetual improvement and progress towards an ideal form of freedom. My primary objective is to demonstrate an affinity in principle between the moral, political, and educational thought of Thomas Jefferson and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. While similarity is demonstrable, I do not claim that Jeffersonian republicanism and Rousseauian republicanism are merely ideological or theoretical carbon copies; each is, in fact, distinct in its ...


Bicameral Bargaining And Resolution In The United States, Joshua M. Ryan Jan 2011

Bicameral Bargaining And Resolution In The United States, Joshua M. Ryan

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

In most bicameral systems, both legislative chambers must agree on a bill before it may become law. In the United States Congress, agreement often comes during negotiations which occur after each chamber has passed an initial version of the bill. Our understanding of the post-passage resolution process is very limited and has traditionally been limited to question of "who wins" in conference committees. The post-passage bargaining process is more complex and more important than this work suggests. For example, it is not well understood why the House and Senate must sometimes bargain and why they can sometimes agree on legislation ...


Between The Veil And The Vote: Exploring Incentives To Politically Incorporate Women In The Arab World, Bozena Christina Welborne Jan 2011

Between The Veil And The Vote: Exploring Incentives To Politically Incorporate Women In The Arab World, Bozena Christina Welborne

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The 30th anniversary of the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) renewed debate on proposed mechanisms to enhance women's political influence across the developing and developed world. Despite common perceptions that women's political opportunities are uniformly limited in the Arab world, considerable variation exists. This dissertation explores the incentives behind this unexpected variation through both cross- national statistical and case study analysis, relying on data gathered over two years of fieldwork and from 100 interviews across Bahrain, Morocco, and Jordan. I demonstrate that international capital plays a key role in creating incentives to incorporate women ...


Provisional To Perfect: A Kantian Theory Of Humanitarian Intervention, Heather Roff Perkins Jan 2010

Provisional To Perfect: A Kantian Theory Of Humanitarian Intervention, Heather Roff Perkins

Political Science Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Several scholars claim that Kant’s ethical and political theories are inconsistent. These “inconsistencies” become apparent when scholars attempt to apply Kant’s ethical and political framework to problems in international relations, such as humanitarian intervention (HI). Kok-Chor Tan argues that HI is an imperfect duty of benevolence (ethics), for example, while Carla Bagnoli argues that HI a perfect duty of right (justice). I argue the parties in this debate are misguided, though much of the disagreement is owing to a failure on Kant’s part to provide a robust conception of justice in the state of nature. First, I ...