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Arts and Humanities

SelectedWorks

Brian W Dotts

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Political Science

Schooling In The ‘Iron Cage’ And The Crucial Role Of Interpretive, Normative, And Critical Perspectives In Social Foundations Studies, Brian W. Dotts Jan 2013

Schooling In The ‘Iron Cage’ And The Crucial Role Of Interpretive, Normative, And Critical Perspectives In Social Foundations Studies, Brian W. Dotts

Brian W Dotts

This article addresses the unique role performed by social foundations programs in colleges of education and in addressing broader issues facing education today, which fundamentally include the development of interpretive, normative, and critical perspectives in academia. All three perspectives serve to create a scholarly framework within which students and academicians interpret and normatively reflect upon existing educational, political, historical, religious, economic, and social institutions critically. In other words, although many departments in colleges of education tend to fulfill the functional, professional, and institutional requirements essential in preparing future teachers to enter public and private schools, social foundations programs utilize interdisciplinary ...


The Democratic-Republican Societies: An Educational Dream Deferred, Brian W. Dotts Jan 2010

The Democratic-Republican Societies: An Educational Dream Deferred, Brian W. Dotts

Brian W Dotts

No abstract provided.


Cato’S Resolve And The Revolutionary Spirit: Political Education, Civic Action, And The Democratic-Republican Societies Of The 1790s, Brian W. Dotts Jan 2006

Cato’S Resolve And The Revolutionary Spirit: Political Education, Civic Action, And The Democratic-Republican Societies Of The 1790s, Brian W. Dotts

Brian W Dotts

In an address to friends and fellow citizens, published in the National Gazette in 1793, the German Republican Society of Philadelphia openly proclaimed one of its main principles: “The spirit of liberty, like every virtue of the mind, is to be kept alive only by constant action.” One year later, at a civic festival in Philadelphia while commemorating the success of the French Revolution, the Democratic Society of Pennsylvania and its sister society, the German Republicans, raised their glasses and toasted: “Knowledge:—May every Citizen be so learned as to know his rights, and so brave as to assert them ...